Hāngi

hangiHāngīumuumu/hāngi
Hāngi is a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven, also called an umu.wikipedia
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New Zealand

🇳🇿NZLNZ
Hāngi is a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven, also called an umu. It is still used for large groups on special occasions.
A hāngi is a traditional Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven.

Wairau Bar

Evidence from early Polynesian settler sites in New Zealand such as Wairau Bar and in coastal Otago Peninsula from about 1280 shows a significant number of large cooking pits or umu which were designed to cook ti-pore or various other species of Cordyline.
An investigation by a team from Otago University found a huge stone-lined umu or hangi pit (earth oven) 1.5 m deep by 4 m across—estimated to be big enough to feed 1000 people by a local Maori familiar with modern hangi.

Earth oven

umupit ovencooking pit
Hāngi is a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven, also called an umu. It is still used for large groups on special occasions.
Today, many communities still use cooking pits for ceremonial or celebratory occasions, including the indigenous Fijian lovo, the Hawaiian imu, the Māori hāngi, the Mexican barbacoa, and the New England clam bake.

Cordyline

Cabbage treesnanggaria
Evidence from early Polynesian settler sites in New Zealand such as Wairau Bar and in coastal Otago Peninsula from about 1280 shows a significant number of large cooking pits or umu which were designed to cook ti-pore or various other species of Cordyline.
The rhizome was roasted in an hāngi (earth oven) by Māori to extract sugar.

Clambake

clam bakeClam bakesNative American clambake
Clam bake
Hangi

Pachamanca

Andean pachamanca
Pachamanca
Hangi (New Zealand)

Māori people

MāoriMaoriNew Zealand Māori
Hāngi is a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven, also called an umu. It is still used for large groups on special occasions.

Cooking

cookerycookcooked
Hāngi is a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven, also called an umu. It is still used for large groups on special occasions.

Polynesian culture

Polynesianculturally PolynesianPolynesians
Evidence from early Polynesian settler sites in New Zealand such as Wairau Bar and in coastal Otago Peninsula from about 1280 shows a significant number of large cooking pits or umu which were designed to cook ti-pore or various other species of Cordyline.

Otago Peninsula

Mount CharlesLovers Leap and The ChasmOtago Head
Evidence from early Polynesian settler sites in New Zealand such as Wairau Bar and in coastal Otago Peninsula from about 1280 shows a significant number of large cooking pits or umu which were designed to cook ti-pore or various other species of Cordyline.

Cordyline fruticosa

titi leavesti plant
Evidence from early Polynesian settler sites in New Zealand such as Wairau Bar and in coastal Otago Peninsula from about 1280 shows a significant number of large cooking pits or umu which were designed to cook ti-pore or various other species of Cordyline.

Cook Islands

🇨🇰Cook IslandCook
This was a common east Polynesian practice in the Cook Islands and Society Islands, and the remains of large umu have also been found in the Kermadec Islands.

Society Islands

SocietySocietiesSociety group
This was a common east Polynesian practice in the Cook Islands and Society Islands, and the remains of large umu have also been found in the Kermadec Islands.

Kermadec Islands

KermadecKermadecsKermadec volcanic arc
This was a common east Polynesian practice in the Cook Islands and Society Islands, and the remains of large umu have also been found in the Kermadec Islands.

Otago

Otago LakesOtago RegionCentral Otago
Investigation in Otago shows that most pits were used only once or twice.

New Zealand cuisine

New Zealandkaiboil-up
Like other Polynesian people, Māori cooked food in earth ovens, known in New Zealand as hāngi, although the word umu is also used as in other Pacific languages.

Māori culture

MāoriMaoriculture
Large quantities of tī tubers were eaten that were slow-cooked in large umu or hāngi (earth ovens) to get rid of poison and to produce a slightly sweet pulp.

Ngaruawahia

Centennial ParkNgāruawāhiaHopuhopu
Officers from the United States visited Ngaruawahia during World War II and would share food at hāngis.

Moutohora Island

Whale IslandMoutohoraMoutohora (Whale)
After permanent Maori occupation ceased in the early nineteenth century, Ngāti Awa and Tūhoe continued to visit the island for sea food and muttonbirds and to collect stones for hāngi (underground ovens).

Barnet Burns

Resigned to being eaten, she assisted in preparing potatoes and threw herself onto the fire for a hāngi feast.

Umu

Māori hāngi, also called umu in Samoa, especially in older texts

List of cooking techniques

techniquescooking techniquecooking techniques
Hāngi – a traditional New Zealand Māori method of cooking food using heated rocks buried in a pit oven still used for special occasions.