H-index

h''-indexHirsch indexi10-indexH indexHirsch numberHirsch-indexh5-indexHirsch (h) indexGoogle Scholar H-indexH
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.wikipedia
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Jorge E. Hirsch

Jorge Hirsch
The index was suggested in 2005 by Jorge E. Hirsch, a physicist at UC San Diego, as a tool for determining theoretical physicists' relative quality and is sometimes called the Hirsch index or Hirsch number.
He is known for inventing the h-index in 2005, an index for quantifying a scientist's publication productivity and the basis of several scholar indices.

Author-level metrics

author-level metricauthor-levelcitation impact
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.
A prime example is the h-index.

Citation impact

citation metricscitation countimpact
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.
The best-known measures include the h-index and the g-index.

Arthur Eddington

Arthur Stanley EddingtonSir Arthur EddingtonEddington
Eddington number, an earlier metric used for evaluating cyclists.
The Eddington number for cycling is analogous to the h-index that quantifies both the actual scientific productivity and the apparent scientific impact of a scientist.

Scopus

Scopus (Elsevier)scopus.com
Subscription-based databases such as Scopus and the Web of Science provide automated calculators.
Scopus gives four types of quality measure for each title; those are h-Index, CiteScore, SJR (SCImago Journal Rank) and SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper).

Impact factor

impactjournal impact factorimpact factors
The h-index serves as an alternative to more traditional journal impact factor metrics in the evaluation of the impact of the work of a particular researcher.
In February 2010, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation) published new guidelines to evaluate only articles and no bibliometric information on candidates to be evaluated in all decisions concerning "performance-based funding allocations, postdoctoral qualifications, appointments, or reviewing funding proposals, [where] increasing importance has been given to numerical indicators such as the h-index and the impact factor".

Google Scholar

Google Scholar Citationsaimed at the academic communityGoogle Scholar and academic libraries
From July 2011 Google have provided an automatically-calculated h-index and i10-index within their own Google Scholar profile.
Google Scholar automatically calculates and displays the individual's total citation count, h-index, and i10-index.

Solomon H. Snyder

Solomon SnyderSolomon Halbert SnyderSol Snyder
For the most highly cited scientists in the period 1983–2002, Hirsch identified the top 10 in the life sciences (in order of decreasing h): Solomon H. Snyder, h = 191; David Baltimore, h = 160; Robert C. Gallo, h = 154; Pierre Chambon, h = 153; Bert Vogelstein, h = 151; Salvador Moncada, h = 143; Charles A. Dinarello, h = 138; Tadamitsu Kishimoto, h = 134; Ronald M. Evans, h = 127; Axel Ullrich, h = 120; and Ralph L. Brinster, h = 120.
He is one of the most highly cited researchers in the biological and biomedical sciences, with the highest h-index in those fields for the years 1983–2002, and then from 2007–2019.

Tadamitsu Kishimoto

For the most highly cited scientists in the period 1983–2002, Hirsch identified the top 10 in the life sciences (in order of decreasing h): Solomon H. Snyder, h = 191; David Baltimore, h = 160; Robert C. Gallo, h = 154; Pierre Chambon, h = 153; Bert Vogelstein, h = 151; Salvador Moncada, h = 143; Charles A. Dinarello, h = 138; Tadamitsu Kishimoto, h = 134; Ronald M. Evans, h = 127; Axel Ullrich, h = 120; and Ralph L. Brinster, h = 120.
He is listed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) as a highly cited biologist and he is also in the top ten of h-index of living biologists.

Web of Science

ISI Web of KnowledgeWeb of KnowledgeISI
Subscription-based databases such as Scopus and the Web of Science provide automated calculators.

Ralph L. Brinster

Palmiter and Brinster
For the most highly cited scientists in the period 1983–2002, Hirsch identified the top 10 in the life sciences (in order of decreasing h): Solomon H. Snyder, h = 191; David Baltimore, h = 160; Robert C. Gallo, h = 154; Pierre Chambon, h = 153; Bert Vogelstein, h = 151; Salvador Moncada, h = 143; Charles A. Dinarello, h = 138; Tadamitsu Kishimoto, h = 134; Ronald M. Evans, h = 127; Axel Ullrich, h = 120; and Ralph L. Brinster, h = 120.
His h-index, a commonly used calculation estimating research impact, is 120, which ranks among the highest in the life sciences.

Axel Ullrich

Professor Dr. Axel Ullrich
For the most highly cited scientists in the period 1983–2002, Hirsch identified the top 10 in the life sciences (in order of decreasing h): Solomon H. Snyder, h = 191; David Baltimore, h = 160; Robert C. Gallo, h = 154; Pierre Chambon, h = 153; Bert Vogelstein, h = 151; Salvador Moncada, h = 143; Charles A. Dinarello, h = 138; Tadamitsu Kishimoto, h = 134; Ronald M. Evans, h = 127; Axel Ullrich, h = 120; and Ralph L. Brinster, h = 120.
He is listed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) as a highly cited biologist and he is also in the top ten of H-index of living biologists.

Partition (number theory)

partitionpartitionsinteger partition
It also has some practical significance in the form of the h-index.

G-index

g''-index
:The g-index is an alternative for the older h-index, which does not average the numbers of citations.

Eigenfactor

eigenfactor.org
It can also be used in combination with the h-index to evaluate the work of individual scientists.

SCIgen

Rooter: A Methodology for the Typical Unification of Access Points and RedundancySCIgen § In conferences
Cyril Labbé from Grenoble University demonstrated the vulnerability of h-index calculations based on Google Scholar output by feeding it a large set of SCIgen-generated documents that were citing each other, effectively an academic link farm, in a 2010 paper.

Erdős number

Shusaku numberErdös number2
It has been argued that "for an individual researcher, a measure such as Erdős number captures the structural properties of [the] network whereas the h-index captures the citation impact of the publications," and that "One can be easily convinced that ranking in coauthorship networks should take into account both measures to generate a realistic and acceptable ranking."

Productivity

productiveproductivity growtheconomic productivity
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.

Scientific literature

reportedscientific publicationsscientific article
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.

Scientist

scientistsresearch scientistscience
The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar.

Academic journal

journaljournalsacademic journals
The index can also be applied to the productivity and impact of a scholarly journal as well as a group of scientists, such as a department or university or country.

University of California, San Diego

UC San DiegoUniversity of California San DiegoUCSD
The index was suggested in 2005 by Jorge E. Hirsch, a physicist at UC San Diego, as a tool for determining theoretical physicists' relative quality and is sometimes called the Hirsch index or Hirsch number.

Theoretical physics

theoretical physicisttheoreticaltheoretical physicists
The index was suggested in 2005 by Jorge E. Hirsch, a physicist at UC San Diego, as a tool for determining theoretical physicists' relative quality and is sometimes called the Hirsch index or Hirsch number.