H.J. Whitley

H. J. WhitleyHobart Johnstone Whitley
Hobart Johnstone Whitley (October 7, 1847 – June 3, 1931), also known as H.J.wikipedia
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Hollywood

Hollywood, CaliforniaHollywood, CAHollywood, Los Angeles, California
He was a real estate developer who helped create the Hollywood subdivision in Los Angeles, Southern California.
According to the diary of H. J. Whitley, also known as the "Father of Hollywood", on his honeymoon in 1886 he stood at the top of the hill looking out over the valley.

Hollywood Sign

Hollywoodland signHollywoodlanda large sign
The Hollywood sign was first erected in 1923.
H.J. Whitley had already used a sign to advertise his development Whitley Heights, which was between Highland Avenue and Vine Street.

Guthrie, Oklahoma

GuthrieGuthrie, Oklahoma TerritoryOklahoma (Guthrie)
Whitley traveled to Washington D.C. where he persuaded the U.S. Congress to allow the City of Guthrie, Oklahoma to be the new capital of the state of Oklahoma.
Hobart Johnstone Whitley, also known as HJ and the 'Father of Hollywood,' was the first president of the Guthrie Chamber of Commerce.

Hollywood Hotel

Hotel Hollywood
Whitley built a Hollywood Hotel and a bank as the foundation of almost every town he developed.
It was built by early Hollywood developer H.J. Whitley, to support selling residential lots to potential buyers arriving from Los Angeles by the electric Balloon Route trolly of the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad.

Owensmouth

Besides his land developments, he was also the President of the National Loan & Trust Company, Guthrie, Oklahoma, Vice President of Home Savings Bank, President of First National Bank of Van Nuys, State Bank of Owensmouth and Bank of Lankershim; General Manager of the Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company, principal in the Bank of Hollywood, The Whitley Land Company and owner of the H.J. Whitley Company jewelry store. Henry E. Huntington, extended his Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) through the Valley to Owensmouth (now Canoga Park).
Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company was owned by a syndicate of rich Los Angeles investors, developers, and speculators: including Harrison Gray Otis, Harry Chandler, Moses Sherman, Hobart Johnstone Whitley, and others.

Whitley Heights, Los Angeles

Whitley HeightsWhitley Heights Historic DistrictWhitley Park
In 1982, the U.S. Government named Whitley Heights a National Historic District.
Hobart Johnstone Whitley bought the hillside area in 1901-03 and hired architect Arthur Barnes to build houses in a Mediterranean style which he thought would suit Southern California's climate.

Van Nuys

Van Nuys, CaliforniaVan Nuys, CAVan Nuys, Los Angeles
On the land he planned the new towns of Van Nuys, Marian (present day Reseda), and Owensmouth (present day Canoga Park, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Woodland Hills and West Hills).
In 1909 the Suburban Homes Company, a syndicate led by H. J. Whitley, general manager of the Board of Control, along with Harry Chandler, H. G. Otis, M. H. Sherman and O. F. Brandt purchased 48,000 acres of the Farming and Milling Company for $2,500,000.

Reseda, Los Angeles

ResedaReseda, CaliforniaReseda Country Club
On the land he planned the new towns of Van Nuys, Marian (present day Reseda), and Owensmouth (present day Canoga Park, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Woodland Hills and West Hills).
In 1909 the Suburban Homes Company, a syndicate led by H. J. Whitley, general manager of the Board of Control, along with Harry Chandler, H. G. Otis, M. H. Sherman and O. F. Brandt purchased 48,000 acres of the Farming and Milling Company for $2,500,000.

Canoga Park, Los Angeles

Canoga ParkCanoga Park, CaliforniaCanoga Park area of Los Angeles
On the land he planned the new towns of Van Nuys, Marian (present day Reseda), and Owensmouth (present day Canoga Park, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Woodland Hills and West Hills).
In 1909 the Suburban Homes Company, a syndicate led by H. J. Whitley, general manager of the Board of Control, along with Harry Chandler, H. G. Otis, M. H. Sherman and O. F. Brandt purchased 48,000 acres of the Farming and Milling Company for $2,500,000.

San Fernando Valley

San Fernandothe ValleySan Fernando Valley, California
After Whitley saw the San Fernando Valley and heard of William Mulholland's ideas for a new aqueduct, he began discussing opportunities with business associates in Los Angeles.
In 1909 the Suburban Homes Company, a syndicate led by H. J. Whitley, general manager of the board of control, along with Harry Chandler, H.G. Otis, M.H. Sherman, and O.F. Brandt purchased 48,000 acres of the Farming and Milling Company for $2,500,000.

San Fernando (Pacific Electric)

San Fernando LineSan Fernando
To link the new town developments, Whitley planned for the syndicate to include construction of the San Fernando Line, a new 20 mi long extension of the Pacific Electric railway system.
The syndicate was led by Harry Chandler, with partners General Moses Sherman, Isaac Van Nuys, Hobart Johnstone Whitley, and James Boon Lankershim.

Pacific Electric

Pacific Electric RailwayPacific Electric Red CarsRed Car
To link the new town developments, Whitley planned for the syndicate to include construction of the San Fernando Line, a new 20 mi long extension of the Pacific Electric railway system. Henry E. Huntington, extended his Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) through the Valley to Owensmouth (now Canoga Park).
Moses Sherman, Harry Chandler, Hobart Johnstone Whitley, and others bought the entire southern San Fernando Valley in 1910.

Moses Sherman

Gen. Moses Hazeltine ShermanGeneral Moses ShermanM. H. Sherman
Its partners included Whitley, as General Manager of the Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company, General H G Otis, General Manager and owner Los Angeles Times, General Moses Sherman, Pioneer Builder of Inter-Urban Electric Lines, O. F. Brandt, General Manager of Title Insurance & Trust Company and Harry Chandler, Vice President and assistant manager of the "Los Angeles Times,".
The formation of a land speculation syndicate, the Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company, included Moses Sherman and partners Hobart Johnstone Whitley, Isaac Newton Van Nuys, James Boon Lankershim, and Harry Chandler, manager of the "Los Angeles Times," as directors.

Corcoran, California

CorcoranCorcoran High SchoolCorcoran (CA)
H.J. Whitley took the lead in building the city of Corcoran, California.
Corcoran was founded by Hobart Johnstone Whitley, a prominent land developer from southern California, who took the lead in building Corcoran (the main street of the community is named in his honor).

Southern California

southernSoCalCalifornia
He was a real estate developer who helped create the Hollywood subdivision in Los Angeles, Southern California.

Toronto

Toronto, OntarioToronto, ONToronto, Canada
Hobart Johnstone (H.J.) Whitley was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the seventh and youngest son of Joseph Whitley and Eleanor Johnstone.

United States nationality law

AmericanU.S. citizenUnited States
Whitley became a naturalized citizen of the United States in the 1870s.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
Whitley moved to Chicago and owned a hardware store and candy store.

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad

Rock IslandRock Island RailroadRI
He became interested in land development and was elected to the board of directors of the Chicago Rock Island Railroad.

Oklahoma Territory

OklahomaTerritory of OklahomaOffice of the Territorial Attorney General
During the westward construction of frontier railroads from the late 1870s to the early 1890s, he founded scores of towns in the Oklahoma Territory, the Dakotas, Texas and California.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltRooseveltPresident Theodore Roosevelt
Whitley was a good friend of Theodore Roosevelt while in the Dakota Territory.

Dakota Territory

DakotaTerritorial legislatureDakota Territorial Legislature
Whitley was a good friend of Theodore Roosevelt while in the Dakota Territory.

Land Rush of 1889

89erLand RunLand Run of 1889
Whitley was at the first Oklahoma Land Run of 1889, April 22, where he claimed property.

Governor of Oklahoma

GovernorOklahoma GovernorGovernor of Oklahoma Territory
He built the first brick block building in the territory and was asked by the local people to be the first Governor of Oklahoma.

Washington, D.C.

WashingtonDistrict of ColumbiaWashington, DC
Whitley traveled to Washington D.C. where he persuaded the U.S. Congress to allow the City of Guthrie, Oklahoma to be the new capital of the state of Oklahoma.