H. A. Willis

Willis, HA
H.A. Willis, born Howard Alan Willis on 15 November 1948, is an Australian essayist, critic and editor.wikipedia
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Colac, Victoria

ColacCity of ColacColac Amateur Festival
The son of a Lands Department inspector in Victoria, Willis was born at Colac and grew up at Apollo Bay, Kyneton and Ballarat.
H. A. Willis – writer, b. 1948.

Bad Blood (1981 film)

Bad BloodBad Blood'' (1982 film)Bad Blood'' (TV series)
The feature film Bad Blood, based on his book, starred Jack Thompson and Carol Burns.
The script was based upon Manhunt: The Story of Stanley Graham, by H. A. Willis (Whitcoulls, 1979) and adapted by New Zealand-born Andrew Brown.

Stanley Graham

1941 Kowhitirangi shootingsGraham, Eric Stanley GeorgeStan Graham
The film concerned the twelve-day manhunt (in October 1941) for mass killer Stanley Graham.
H. A. Willis, Manhunt : the story of Stanley Graham, Christchurch: Whitcoulls, 1979. ISBN: 9780723306290

History wars

black armband view of historyhistory wara major controversy
Willis has been involved in two aspects of the Australian "History wars".
H. A. Willis (2010), in a survey of much of the literature discussed above, reiterated the argument made by Campbell.

Keith Windschuttle

Windschuttle, KeithHoax
When Keith Windschuttle published The Fabrication of Aboriginal History, Volume One (2002), Willis undertook a detailed analysis of the author's cited sources in order to dispute his figure for Tasmanian Aborigines killed during hostilities in Van Diemen's Land.
Manne, who called the book "one of the most implausible, ignorant and pitiless books about Australian history written for many years", himself summed up the case against Windschuttle, noting that Windschuttle's evidence for Aboriginal deaths is derived from a scholar, Plomley, who denied that any estimate for them could be made from the documentary record; that a scrupulous conservative scholar, H. A. Willis, using exactly the same sources as Windschuttle, came up with a figure of 188 violent deaths, and another 145 rumoured deaths; that Windschuttle's method excludes deaths of Aborigines who were wounded, and later died; that all surviving Aborigines transported by Robinson to Flinders' Island bore marks of violence and gunshot wounds "perpetrated on them by depraved whites"; that Windschuttle cannot deny that between 1803 and 1834 almost all Tasmanian Aborigines died, and the only evidence for disease as a factor before 1829 rests on a single conversation recorded by James Bonwick, and that Aboriginal women who lived with sealers did not, however, die off from contact with bearers of foreign disease; that Windschuttle likened Aboriginal attacks on British settlers to "modern-day junkies raiding service stations for money", whereas both colonial records and modern historians speak of them as highly "patriotic", attached to their lands, and engaged in a veritable war to defend it from settlement; that by Windschuttle's own figures, the violent death rate of Aborigines in Tasmania in the 1820s must have been 360 times the murder rate in contemporary New York; that Windschuttle shows scarce familiarity with period books, citing only 3 of the 30 books published on Van Diemen's land for the period 1803–1834, and with one of them confuses the date of the first visit by the French with the publication date of the volume that recounted their expedition; that it is nonsensical to argue that a people who had wandered over an island and survived for 34,000 years had no attachment to their land; that Windschuttle finds no native words in 19th century wordlists for "land" to attest to such an attachment, when modern wordlists show 23 entries under "country".

History of smallpox

smallpoxsmallpox epidemicsmallpox epidemics
In 2010, he joined the debate over the introduction and history of smallpox in Australia, arguing that the 1789 outbreak near Sydney originated from a Macassan introduction through Northern Australia.
H. A. Willis (2010), in a survey of the literature discussed above, endorsed Campbell's argument.

Apollo Bay

Apollo Bay Music FestivalSeal Point
The son of a Lands Department inspector in Victoria, Willis was born at Colac and grew up at Apollo Bay, Kyneton and Ballarat.
H. A. Willis – essayist, spent his early childhood in Apollo Bay

Kyneton

Kyneton Mechanics InstituteKyneton RoadKyneton, Victoria
The son of a Lands Department inspector in Victoria, Willis was born at Colac and grew up at Apollo Bay, Kyneton and Ballarat.

Ballarat

Ballarat, VictoriaBallarat EastBallarat West
The son of a Lands Department inspector in Victoria, Willis was born at Colac and grew up at Apollo Bay, Kyneton and Ballarat.

Darwin, Northern Territory

DarwinDarwin, AustraliaPort Darwin
He subsequently lived in Darwin and Auckland, New Zealand (1970–80) and rural Tasmania before settling with his wife and two young sons in Perth in 1981.

Auckland

Auckland, New ZealandAuckland CityAuckland Central
He subsequently lived in Darwin and Auckland, New Zealand (1970–80) and rural Tasmania before settling with his wife and two young sons in Perth in 1981.

Tasmania

TasVan Diemen's LandTasmanian
He subsequently lived in Darwin and Auckland, New Zealand (1970–80) and rural Tasmania before settling with his wife and two young sons in Perth in 1981.

Perth

Perth, AustraliaPerth, Western AustraliaPerth, WA
He subsequently lived in Darwin and Auckland, New Zealand (1970–80) and rural Tasmania before settling with his wife and two young sons in Perth in 1981.

La Trobe University

La TrobeLatrobeLatrobe University
As a student at La Trobe University in the late 1960s, Willis was part of a group (which also included Philippe Mora, Peter Beilby, Rod Bishop and Demos Krouskos), that wrote and produced the first issue of Cinema Papers (October 1967).

Philippe Mora

As a student at La Trobe University in the late 1960s, Willis was part of a group (which also included Philippe Mora, Peter Beilby, Rod Bishop and Demos Krouskos), that wrote and produced the first issue of Cinema Papers (October 1967).

Cinema Papers

As a student at La Trobe University in the late 1960s, Willis was part of a group (which also included Philippe Mora, Peter Beilby, Rod Bishop and Demos Krouskos), that wrote and produced the first issue of Cinema Papers (October 1967).

University of Auckland

Auckland University CollegeAuckland UniversityThe University of Auckland
While studying at the University of Auckland, Willis was a founding member of Alternative Cinema, an Auckland film-makers’ cooperative established in 1972.

New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation

NZBCBCNZN.Z.B.C.
Willis (under the credit "Alan Willis") produced a half-hour television documentary, Stanley, filmed in October–November 1974 for the NZBC.

Jack Thompson (actor)

Jack ThompsonJack Thompson and the Original SinnerJack Thompson.
The feature film Bad Blood, based on his book, starred Jack Thompson and Carol Burns.

Carol Burns

Carol “Franky Doyle” Burns
The feature film Bad Blood, based on his book, starred Jack Thompson and Carol Burns.

Hokitika

St Mary's SchoolHokitika Cemetery
In 2012, Willis returned to Hokitika, where Graham is buried.

The West Australian

West AustralianWest Australian NewspapersThe Perth Gazette
His account of his trip to Westland and the Graham story was published in the "Travel" section of The West Australian.

Christchurch

Christchurch, New ZealandChristchurch CityChristchurch City Council
Willis's 2012 visit to New Zealand also generated articles paying homage to the earthquake damaged city of Christchurch and the philosopher Karl Popper (a resident of Christchurch in 1937–45).

Karl Popper

PopperSir Karl PopperPopperian
Willis's 2012 visit to New Zealand also generated articles paying homage to the earthquake damaged city of Christchurch and the philosopher Karl Popper (a resident of Christchurch in 1937–45).

The Age

AgeSunday AgeThe Sunday Age
Between 1989 and 2006, he wrote about 250 reviews for The West Australian, The Age and The Canberra Times.