Habitat

habitatsmicrohabitatnatural habitatwildlife habitatbreeding groundmicrohabitatshabitat typeinhabitsmicroenvironmentbreeding grounds
See also Microhabitat (film) or Habitat (disambiguation).wikipedia
16,964 Related Articles

Natural environment

environmentenvironmentalpaleoenvironment
In ecology, a habitat is the type of natural environment in which a particular species of organism lives.
Natural environment is often used as a synonym for habitat, for instance, when we say that the natural environment of giraffes is the savanna.

Stream

creekstreamscreeks
Fresh water habitats include marshes, streams, rivers, lakes, and ponds, and marine habitats include salt marshes, the coast, the intertidal zone, estuaries, reefs, bays, the open sea, the sea bed, deep water and submarine vents.
The biological habitat in the immediate vicinity of a stream is called a riparian zone.

Biotope

biotopeshabitatbiotope aquarium
It is similar in meaning to a biotope; an area of uniform environmental conditions associated with a particular community of plants and animals.
Biotope is almost synonymous with the term habitat, which is more commonly used in English-speaking countries.

Invasive species

invasiveinvasive plant speciesinvasive plant
Similarly coastal habitats can become dominated by kelp until the seabed is disturbed by a storm and the algae swept away, or shifting sediment exposes new areas for colonisation. Another cause of disturbance is when an area may be overwhelmed by an invasive introduced species which is not kept under control by natural enemies in its new habitat. In restoration ecology of native plant communities or habitats, some invasive species create monotypic stands that replace and/or prevent other species, especially indigenous ones, from growing there.
The term as most often used applies to introduced species that adversely affect the habitats and bioregions they invade economically, environmentally, or ecologically.

Marsh

marshlandmarshesmarshlands
Fresh water habitats include marshes, streams, rivers, lakes, and ponds, and marine habitats include salt marshes, the coast, the intertidal zone, estuaries, reefs, bays, the open sea, the sea bed, deep water and submarine vents.
Marshes provide habitats for many kinds of invertebrates, fish, amphibians, waterfowl and aquatic mammals.

Biome

biotabiomesmajor habitat type
Within these broad biomes are more specific habitats with varying climate types, temperature regimes, soils, altitudes and vegetation types.
Biome is a broader term than habitat; any biome can comprise a variety of habitats.

Tide pool

tide poolstidal pooltidepool
Further variations include rock pools, sand banks, mudflats, brackish lagoons, sandy and pebbly beaches, and seagrass beds, all supporting their own flora and fauna.
Many tide pools are habitats of especially adaptable animals that have engaged the attention of naturalists and marine biologists, as well as philosophical essayists: John Steinbeck wrote in The Log from the Sea of Cortez, "It is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool."

Vernal pool

vernal poolstemporary poolephemeral pool
Vernal pools are ephemeral ponds that form in the rainy season and dry up afterwards.
Certain tropical fish lineages (such as killifishes) have however adapted to this habitat specifically.

Intertidal zone

intertidalforeshoretidal zone
Fresh water habitats include marshes, streams, rivers, lakes, and ponds, and marine habitats include salt marshes, the coast, the intertidal zone, estuaries, reefs, bays, the open sea, the sea bed, deep water and submarine vents.
The intertidal zone is one of a number of marine biomes or habitats, including estuary, neritic, surface, and deep zones.

Raccoon

raccoonsProcyon lotorCommon raccoon
Rats and mice have followed man around the globe, pigeons, peregrines, sparrows, swallows and house martins use the buildings for nesting, bats use roof space for roosting, foxes visit the garbage bins and squirrels, coyotes, raccoons and skunks roam the streets.
The original habitats of the raccoon are deciduous and mixed forests, but due to their adaptability they have extended their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes, and urban areas, where some homeowners consider them to be pests.

Bacteria

bacteriumbacterialEubacteria
There are bacteria, for example, living in Lake Whillans, half a mile below the ice of Antarctica; in the absence of sunlight, they must rely on organic material from elsewhere, perhaps decaying matter from glacier melt water or minerals from the underlying rock.
Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of its habitats.

Gastropoda

gastropodgastropodsgastropod molluscs
Its first intermediate host is a snail and the second, a glass shrimp.
The class Gastropoda has an extraordinary diversification of habitats.

Microorganism

microorganismsmicrobemicrobes
Although the vast majority of life on Earth lives in mesophyllic (moderate) environments, a few organisms, most of them microbes, have managed to colonise extreme environments that are unsuitable for most higher life forms.
They live in almost every habitat from the poles to the equator, deserts, geysers, rocks and the deep sea.

Deforestation

deforestedland clearingforest clearing
Other changes come as a direct result of human activities; deforestation, the plowing of ancient grasslands, the diversion and damming of rivers, the draining of marshland and the dredging of the seabed.
In 2011 Conservation International listed the top 10 most endangered forests, characterized by having all lost 90% or more of their original habitat, and each harboring at least 1500 endemic plant species (species found nowhere else in the world).

Mollusca

molluskmolluscmolluscs
About 350 species of organism, dominated by molluscs, polychaete worms and crustaceans, had been discovered around hydrothermal vents by the end of the twentieth century, most of them being new to science and endemic to these habitats.
Numerous molluscs also live in freshwater and terrestrial habitats.

Archaea

archaeonarcheaarchaebacteria
These bacteria and Archaea are the primary producers in these ecosystems and support a diverse array of life.
The first observed archaea were extremophiles, living in harsh environments, such as hot springs and salt lakes with no other organisms, but improved detection tools led to the discovery of archaea in almost every habitat, including soil, oceans, and marshlands.

Endemism

endemicendemic speciesendemics
About 350 species of organism, dominated by molluscs, polychaete worms and crustaceans, had been discovered around hydrothermal vents by the end of the twentieth century, most of them being new to science and endemic to these habitats.
Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere.

Benthic zone

benthicbottom-dwellingbottom dweller
The benthic zone or seabed provides a home for both static organisms, anchored to the substrate, and for a large range of organisms crawling on or burrowing into the surface.
In oceanic environments, benthic habitats can also be zoned by depth.

Temperate climate

temperatetemperate zonetemperate zones
Habitat types include polar, temperate, subtropical and tropical.

Shoal

sandbarsandbanksand bar
Further variations include rock pools, sand banks, mudflats, brackish lagoons, sandy and pebbly beaches, and seagrass beds, all supporting their own flora and fauna.

Habitat fragmentation

fragmentationfragmentedforest fragmentation
Then there are the changes in habitats brought on by alterations in farming practices, tourism, pollution, fragmentation and climate change.
Habitat fragmentation describes the emergence of discontinuities (fragmentation) in an organism's preferred environment (habitat), causing population fragmentation and ecosystem decay.

Wildlife corridor

corridorbiological corridorcoastal strip
Habitat fragmentation can be ameliorated to some extent by the provision of wildlife corridors connecting the fragments.
A wildlife corridor, habitat corridor, or green corridor is an area of habitat connecting wildlife populations separated by human activities or structures (such as roads, development, or logging).

Habitat destruction

habitat losshabitat degradationloss of habitat
The protection of habitats is a necessary step in the maintenance of biodiversity because if habitat destruction occurs, the animals and plants reliant on that habitat suffer.
Habitat destruction is the process by which a natural habitat becomes incapable of supporting its native species.

Conservation biology

conservationAnimal conservationconservationist
The monotypic habitat occurs in botanical and zoological contexts, and is a component of conservation biology.
Conservation biology is the management of nature and of Earth's biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction and the erosion of biotic interactions.

Restoration ecology

restorationecological restorationhabitat restoration
In restoration ecology of native plant communities or habitats, some invasive species create monotypic stands that replace and/or prevent other species, especially indigenous ones, from growing there.
Restoration ecology is the scientific study supporting the practice of ecological restoration, which is the practice of renewing and restoring degraded, damaged, or destroyed ecosystems and habitats in the environment by active human intervention and action.