Habsburg Monarchy

Habsburg EmpireHabsburgAustriaAustrianAustrian monarchyHabsburg AustriaHabsburgsAustriansAustrian EmpireAustrian Habsburgs
Habsburg Monarchy (or Habsburg Empire) is an umbrella term used by historians for the territories, duchies, kingdoms, and other dominions of the House of Habsburg, especially for those of the Austrian branch.wikipedia
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Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor

Ferdinand IFerdinandEmperor Ferdinand I
The abdication of Charles V in 1556 led to a broad division of the Habsburg holdings between his brother Ferdinand I, who was his deputy in the Austrian lands since 1521 and the elected king of Hungary and Bohemia since 1526, and his son Philip II of Spain.
Before his accession, he ruled the Austrian hereditary lands of the Habsburgs in the name of his elder brother, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)

Kingdom of HungaryRoyal HungaryHungary
The abdication of Charles V in 1556 led to a broad division of the Habsburg holdings between his brother Ferdinand I, who was his deputy in the Austrian lands since 1521 and the elected king of Hungary and Bohemia since 1526, and his son Philip II of Spain. Following the death of Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia in the Battle of Mohács against the Turks, Archduke Ferdinand (who was his brother-in-law by virtue of an adoption treaty signed by Maximilian and Louis at the First Congress of Vienna) was also elected the next King of Bohemia and Hungary in 1526.
The Kingdom of Hungary between 1526 and 1867, while outside the Holy Roman Empire, was part of the lands of the Habsburg Monarchy that became the Empire of Austria in 1804.

Duchy of Austria

AustriaAustrianduchy
The formation of the Habsburg Monarchy began with the election of Rudolf I as king of Germany in 1273 and his acquisition of the Duchy of Austria for his house in 1282.
Thereafter, Austria became the patrimony and ancestral homeland of the dynasty and the nucleus of the Habsburg Monarchy.

Rudolf I of Germany

Rudolph I of GermanyRudolph of HabsburgRudolf I
The formation of the Habsburg Monarchy began with the election of Rudolf I as king of Germany in 1273 and his acquisition of the Duchy of Austria for his house in 1282.
The territories remained under Habsburg rule for more than 600 years, forming the core of the Habsburg Monarchy and the present-day country of Austria.

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
From 1804 to 1867 the Habsburg Monarchy was formally unified as the Austrian Empire, and from 1867 to 1918 as the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
The Austrian Empire (, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1867, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.

Prague

Prague, Czech RepublicPrague, CzechoslovakiaPraha
The dynastic capital was Vienna, except from 1583 to 1611, when it was in Prague.
1346–1378). It was an important city to the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Outside the empire it encompassed all the lands of the crown of Hungary, as well as conquests made at the expense of the Turks. Following the death of Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia in the Battle of Mohács against the Turks, Archduke Ferdinand (who was his brother-in-law by virtue of an adoption treaty signed by Maximilian and Louis at the First Congress of Vienna) was also elected the next King of Bohemia and Hungary in 1526.
However, during a long period of peace from 1740 to 1768, the Ottoman military system fell behind that of their European rivals, the Habsburg and Russian empires.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
The Habsburg family originated with the Habsburg Castle in modern Switzerland, and after 1279 came to rule in Austria.
In the 16th century, Austria started serving as the heart of the Habsburg Monarchy and the junior branch of the House of Habsburg – one of the most influential royal dynasties in history.

Battle of Mohács

MohácsBattle of MohacsMohács disaster
Following the death of Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia in the Battle of Mohács against the Turks, Archduke Ferdinand (who was his brother-in-law by virtue of an adoption treaty signed by Maximilian and Louis at the First Congress of Vienna) was also elected the next King of Bohemia and Hungary in 1526.
The Ottoman victory led to the partition of Hungary for several centuries between the Ottoman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, and the Principality of Transylvania.

Switzerland

SwissSwiss ConfederationSWI
The Habsburg family originated with the Habsburg Castle in modern Switzerland, and after 1279 came to rule in Austria.
When war broke out between France and its rivals, Russian and Austrian forces invaded Switzerland.

Diet of Hungary

DietHungarian DietLast Diet
Bohemia and Hungary became hereditary Habsburg domains only in the 17th century: Following victory in the Battle of White Mountain (1620) over the Bohemian rebels, Ferdinand II promulgated a Renewed Constitution (1627) that established hereditary succession over Bohemoa; and following the Battle of Mohács (1687), in which Leopold I reconquered almost all of Hungary from the Ottoman Turks, the emperor held a diet in Pressburg to establish hereditary succession in the Hungarian kingdom.
The articles of the 1790 diet set out that the diet should meet at least once every 3 years, but, since the diet was called by the Habsburg monarchy, this promise was not kept on several occasions thereafter.

Brussels

Brussels, BelgiumBrussels-Capital RegionBruxelles
According to the Habsburg compact of Worms (1521), confirmed a year later in Brussels, Ferdinand was made Archduke as a regent of Charles V in the Austrian hereditary lands.
Charles was now the ruler of a Habsburg Empire "on which the sun never sets" with Brussels serving as his main capital.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
From 1804 to 1867 the Habsburg Monarchy was formally unified as the Austrian Empire, and from 1867 to 1918 as the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
It was ruled by the House of Habsburg, and constituted the last phase in the constitutional evolution of the Habsburg Monarchy.

Emperor

empressemperorsSamraat
Although technically an elective title, by the late 16th century the imperial title had in practice come to be inherited by the Habsburg Archdukes of Austria and following the Thirty Years' War their control over the states (outside the Habsburg Monarchy, i.e. Austria, Bohemia and various territories outside the empire) had become nearly non-existent.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownCrown of BohemiaBohemia
During the reign of King Ferdinand I from 1526, the lands of the Bohemian Crown became a constituent part of the Habsburg Monarchy.

Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian Poland
The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, also known as Galicia or Austrian Poland, was established in 1772 as a crownland of the Habsburg Monarchy as a result of the First Partition of Poland.

Treaty of Teschen

Peace of TeschenCongress of TeschenTeschen
The Treaty of Teschen (Frieden von Teschen, i.e., "Peace of Teschen"; Traité de Teschen) was signed on 13 May 1779 in Teschen, Austrian Silesia, between the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy and the Kingdom of Prussia, which officially ended the War of the Bavarian Succession.

Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienViennese
The dynastic capital was Vienna, except from 1583 to 1611, when it was in Prague.
Companies in Vienna have extensive contacts and competences in business with Eastern Europe due to the city's historical role as centre of the Habsburg Empire.

Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen

TransleithaniaKingdom of HungaryHungary
The Hungarian parts of the Empire were called "Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen" or "Lands of Holy (St.) Stephen's Crown" (Länder der Heiligen Stephans Krone).
Cisleithania, the Habsburg lands of the Dual Monarchy that had been part of the Holy Roman Empire with Galicia and Dalmatia, lay to the west (on "this" side) of the Leitha River.

Slovenia

SloveneSlovenianRepublic of Slovenia
Historically, the territory of Slovenia has formed part of many different states, such as: the Roman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Carolingian Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Republic of Venice, the French-administered Illyrian Provinces of the First French Empire of Napoleon I, the Austrian Empire and Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
Furthermore, centuries of infighting between the Italian city-states, such as the Italian Wars of the 15th and 16th centuries, left the region fragmented, and it was subsequently conquered, exploited, and further divided by European powers such as France, Spain and Austria.

Crown land

crown landsroyal demesneroyal domain
From the late 18th century onwards, the territories acquired by the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy were called crown lands (Kronländer).

Inner Austria

Inner-AustriaAustria InteriorInner Austrian Territories
Inner Austria (Innerösterreich, Notranja Avstrija, Austria Interiore) was a term used from the late 14th to the early 17th century for the Habsburg hereditary lands south of the Semmering Pass, referring to the Imperial duchies of Styria, Carinthia and Carniola and the lands of the Austrian Littoral.

Archduchy of Austria

AustriaAustrianArchduchess of Austria
The Archduchy of Austria (Erzherzogtum Österreich) was a major principality of the Holy Roman Empire and the nucleus of the Habsburg Monarchy.

Erblande

Habsburg hereditary landsAustrian hereditary landsHereditary Lands
Within the empire alone this vast monarchy included the original hereditary lands, the Erblande, from before 1526; the lands of the Bohemian crown; the formerly Spanish Netherlands from 1714 until 1794; and some fiefs in Imperial Italy.
The Erblande (Hereditary Lands) of the House of Habsburg formed the Alpine heartland of the Habsburg Monarchy.