Habsburg Netherlands

NetherlandsFlemishLord of the NetherlandsHabsburgLow CountriesSpanish NetherlandsDutchHabsburg ruleSpanishAustrian Netherlands
Habsburg Netherlands (Habsburgse Nederlanden; Pays-Bas des Habsbourg), also referred to as Belgica or Flanders, is the collective name of Holy Roman Empire fiefs in the Low Countries held by the House of Habsburg.wikipedia
407 Related Articles

House of Habsburg

HabsburgHabsburgsHabsburg dynasty
Habsburg Netherlands (Habsburgse Nederlanden; Pays-Bas des Habsbourg), also referred to as Belgica or Flanders, is the collective name of Holy Roman Empire fiefs in the Low Countries held by the House of Habsburg.
The house also produced kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles VEmperor Charles VCharles I of Spain
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor was born in the Habsburg Netherlands and made Brussels his imperial capital.
Charles V (24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was Holy Roman Emperor and Archduke of Austria from 1519, King of Spain (Castile and Aragon, as Charles I) from 1516, and Lord of the Netherlands as titular Duke of Burgundy from 1506.

Seventeen Provinces

NetherlandsLow CountriesDutch province
Becoming the Seventeen Provinces in 1549, they were held by the Spanish branch of the Habsburgs within the Spanish Empire from 1556, and are therefore also known as the Spanish Netherlands from that time on.
The Seventeen Provinces were the Imperial states of the Habsburg Netherlands in the 16th century.

Spanish Netherlands

NetherlandsSpanishLow Countries
Becoming the Seventeen Provinces in 1549, they were held by the Spanish branch of the Habsburgs within the Spanish Empire from 1556, and are therefore also known as the Spanish Netherlands from that time on.
Spanish Netherlands (Países Bajos Españoles; Spaanse Nederlanden; Pays-Bas espagnols, Spanische Niederlande) was the name for the Habsburg Netherlands ruled by the Spanish branch of the Habsburgs from 1556 to 1714.

House of Valois-Burgundy

Valois-BurgundyDukes of BurgundyValois Dukes of Burgundy
The rule began in 1482, when after the death of the Valois-Burgundy duke Charles the Bold the Burgundian Netherlands fell to the Habsburg dynasty by the marriage of Charles's daughter Mary of Burgundy to Archduke Maximilian I of Austria.
Her lands outside of France passed to her eldest son, Philip, to become the Habsburg Netherlands, while the Duchy of Burgundy itself returned to the kingdom of France.

Brussels

Brussels, BelgiumBrussels-Capital RegionBruxelles
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor was born in the Habsburg Netherlands and made Brussels his imperial capital.
It was in the Palace complex at Coudenberg that Charles V was declared of age in 1515, and it was there that he abdicated all of his possessions and passed the Habsburg Netherlands to Philip II of Spain.

Netherlands

DutchThe NetherlandsHolland
The Habsburg Netherlands was a geo-political entity covering the whole of the Low Countries (i.e. the present-day Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and French Nord-Pas-de-Calais) from 1482 to 1581.
Under Habsburg rule, Les pays de par deçà developed in pays d'embas (lands down-here), a deictic expression in relation to other Habsburg possessions like Hungary and Austria.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish colonies
Becoming the Seventeen Provinces in 1549, they were held by the Spanish branch of the Habsburgs within the Spanish Empire from 1556, and are therefore also known as the Spanish Netherlands from that time on.
Charles was also Holy Roman Emperor via his paternal line and, at his abdication, his son Philip II of Spain inherited also Franche-Comté and the Habsburg Netherlands, turning these territories into a Spanish Road in Western Europe.

Low Countries

The Low CountriesLow CountryNetherlands
Habsburg Netherlands (Habsburgse Nederlanden; Pays-Bas des Habsbourg), also referred to as Belgica or Flanders, is the collective name of Holy Roman Empire fiefs in the Low Countries held by the House of Habsburg.
This area was referred to as the Habsburg Netherlands, which was also called the Seventeen Provinces up to 1581.

County of Holland

HollandCounty of Frisiacounts of Holland
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
The County of Holland was a State of the Holy Roman Empire and from 1432 part of the Burgundian Netherlands, from 1482 part of the Habsburg Netherlands and from 1581 onward the leading province of the Dutch Republic, of which it remained a part until the Batavian Revolution in 1795.

Duchy of Brabant

BrabantBrabantineBrabantian
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
It developed from the Landgraviate of Brabant and formed the heart of the historic Low Countries, part of the Burgundian Netherlands from 1430 and of the Habsburg Netherlands from 1482, until it was partitioned after the Dutch revolt.

States General of the Netherlands

States GeneralStates-GeneralStates-General of the Netherlands
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
Each province in the Habsburg Netherlands had its own staten.

Burgundian Netherlands

BurgundianNetherlandsBurgundian court
The rule began in 1482, when after the death of the Valois-Burgundy duke Charles the Bold the Burgundian Netherlands fell to the Habsburg dynasty by the marriage of Charles's daughter Mary of Burgundy to Archduke Maximilian I of Austria.

Burgundian treaty of 1548

1548 Burgundian TreatyTreaty of Augsburg
His Seventeen Provinces were re-organised in the 1548 Burgundian Treaty, whereby the Imperial estates represented in the Imperial Diet at Augsburg acknowledged a certain autonomy of the Netherlands.
The Burgundian treaty of 1548 (ratified on 26 June) settled the status of the Habsburg Netherlands within the Holy Roman Empire.

Philip II of Spain

Philip IIKing Philip IIPhilip
Philip II of Spain, Charles' son, inherited he Seventeen Provinces and incorporated them into the Spanish Crown (which included also south Italy and the American possessions). King Philip II of Spain became infamous for his despotism, and Catholic persecutions sparked the Dutch Revolt and the Eighty Years' War.
From 1555 he was lord of the Seventeen Provinces of the Netherlands.

Eighty Years' War

Eighty Years WarDutch War of IndependenceWar of Independence
King Philip II of Spain became infamous for his despotism, and Catholic persecutions sparked the Dutch Revolt and the Eighty Years' War.
The Eighty Years' War (Tachtigjarige Oorlog; Guerra de los Ochenta Años) or Dutch War of Independence (1568–1648) was a revolt of the Seventeen Provinces of what are today the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg against Philip II of Spain, the sovereign of the Habsburg Netherlands.

List of governors of the Habsburg Netherlands

Governor of the Habsburg NetherlandsGovernor of the Spanish NetherlandsGovernor of the Netherlands
The Governor (Landvoogd) or Governor-General (Gouverneur-Generaal) of the Habsburg Netherlands was a representative appointed by the Holy Roman Emperor (1504-1556), the King of Spain (1556-1598: 1621-1706), and the Archduke of Austria (1716-1794), to administer the Burgundian inheritance of the House of Habsburg in the Low Countries when the monarch was absent from the territory.

Duchy of Luxemburg

Duchy of LuxembourgLuxembourgDuke of Luxembourg
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
The Burgundian Netherlands then came under the rule of the House of Habsburg, beginning the period of the Habsburg Netherlands (1482–1581).

Duke of Burgundy

Dukes of BurgundyBurgundyBurgundian
Duke of Burgundy (duc de Bourgogne) was a title used by the rulers of the Duchy of Burgundy, from its establishmemt in 843 to its annexation by France in 1477, and later by Habsburg sovereigns of the Low Countries (1482-1556).

County of Hainaut

HainautHainaultCounty of Hainault
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
However, the French were defeated at the Battle of Guinegate and Hainaut became a part of the Habsburg Netherlands by the Treaty of Arras in 1482.

Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)

Imperial DietReichstagDiet
His Seventeen Provinces were re-organised in the 1548 Burgundian Treaty, whereby the Imperial estates represented in the Imperial Diet at Augsburg acknowledged a certain autonomy of the Netherlands.
Remarkably, the ecclesiastical bench was headed by the—secular—Archduke of Austria and the Burgundian duke of the Habsburg Netherlands (held by Habsburg Spain from 1556).

Act of Abjuration

Plakkaat van Verlatinghe1581 declarationabjured
In 1579 the northern provinces established the Protestant Union of Utrecht, in which they declared themselves independent as the Seven United Provinces by the 1581 Act of Abjuration.
The Seventeen Provinces of the Habsburg Netherlands were united in a personal union by Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain Charles V with the incorporation of the duchy of Guelders in his Burgundian territories in 1544; and constituted as a separate entity with his Pragmatic Sanction of 1549.

County of Artois

ArtoisCount of ArtoisArtois Hainaut
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.
Then a state of the Holy Roman Empire, Artois as one of the Seventeen Provinces of the Habsburg Netherlands from 1512 on belonged to the Burgundian Circle and from 1556 was held by Habsburg Spain.

Guelders

Duchy of GueldersGelreCounty of Guelders
Philip's son Duke Charles the Bold (1467–1477) also acquired Guelders and Zutphen and even hoped for the royal title from the hands of the Habsburg emperor Frederick III by marrying their children Mary and Maximilian.
Charles united Guelders with the Seventeen Provinces of the Habsburg Netherlands, and Guelders finally lost its independence.

County of Namur

NamurMarquis of Namurmargrave of Namur
Already under the rule of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good (1419–1467), the provinces of the Netherlands began to grow together: Flanders, Artois and Mechelen, Namur, Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg were ruled in personal union by the Valois-Burgundy monarchs and represented in the States-General assembly.