Hair

glabrousglabrescenthuman hairhair shaftcurly hairGlabrousnessglabrous skincurlyhead hairhairs
Hair is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis.wikipedia
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Vellus hair

vellusVelli
The human body, apart from areas of glabrous skin, is covered in follicles which produce thick terminal and fine vellus hair. The body has different types of hair, including vellus hair and androgenic hair, each with its own type of cellular construction.
Vellus hair is short, thin, slight-colored, and barely noticeable hair that develops on most of a person's body during childhood.

Hairstyle

haircuthairstylinghair styling
Attitudes towards different forms of hair, such as hairstyles and hair removal, vary widely across different cultures and historical periods, but it is often used to indicate a person's personal beliefs or social position, such as their age, sex, or religion.
A hairstyle, hairdo, or haircut refers to the styling of hair, usually on the human scalp.

Hair care

haircarehair-carehair oil
Most common interest in hair is focused on hair growth, hair types, and hair care, but hair is also an important biomaterial primarily composed of protein, notably alpha-keratin.
Hair care is an overall term for hygiene and cosmetology involving the hair which grows from the human scalp, and to a lesser extent facial, pubic and other body hair.

Keratin

keratinizationkeratinouskeratinized
All mammalian hair is composed of keratin, so the make-up of hair follicles is not the source of varying hair patterns.
It is the key structural material making up hair, nails, feathers, horns, claws, hooves, calluses, and the outer layer of skin among vertebrates.

Alpha-keratin

α-keratinalphaalpha-keratins
Most common interest in hair is focused on hair growth, hair types, and hair care, but hair is also an important biomaterial primarily composed of protein, notably alpha-keratin.
This protein is the primary component in hairs, horns, mammalian claws, nails and the epidermis layer of the skin.

Medulla (hair)

medullaMedullary
Each strand of hair is made up of the medulla, cortex, and cuticle.
The medulla is the innermost layer of the hair shaft.

Melanin

eumelaninpheomelaninphaeomelanin
The cortex contains melanin, which colors the fiber based on the number, distribution and types of melanin granules.
It is also found in hair, the pigmented tissue underlying the iris of the eye, and the stria vascularis of the inner ear.

Sebaceous gland

sebumsebaceous glandssebaceous
Other structures of the hair follicle include the oil producing sebaceous gland which lubricates the hair and the arrector pili muscles, which are responsible for causing hairs to stand up.
Sebaceous glands are microscopic exocrine glands in the skin that secrete an oily or waxy matter, called sebum, to lubricate and waterproof the skin and hair of mammals.

Frizz

definition of frizzfrizzy
Frizz is hair that does not align with the surrounding hairs, but stands up or curls independently, creating a fuzzy or irregular texture.

Henle's layer

The bulb of hair consists of fibrous connective tissue, glassy membrane, external root sheath, internal root sheath composed of epithelium stratum (Henle's layer) and granular stratum (Huxley's layer), cuticle, cortex and medulla.
Henle's layer is the third and the outermost layer of the inner root sheath of the hair follicle, consisting of a single layer of cubical cells with clear flattened nuclei.

Cuticle (hair)

cuticlehair cuticlecuticula pili
Each strand of hair is made up of the medulla, cortex, and cuticle.
The hair cuticle is the outermost part of the hair shaft.

Biomaterial

biomaterialsbiological materialbiological materials
Most common interest in hair is focused on hair growth, hair types, and hair care, but hair is also an important biomaterial primarily composed of protein, notably alpha-keratin.
One of the first examples of this, in the history of structural biology, is the early X-ray scattering work on the hierarchical structure of hair and wool by Astbury and Woods.

Hair follicle

hair folliclesfolliclefollicles
All mammalian hair is composed of keratin, so the make-up of hair follicles is not the source of varying hair patterns. Hair is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis.
This complex interaction induces the hair follicle to produce different types of hair as seen on different parts of the body.

Eyelash

eyelashesciliaryeyelashes,
The eyelash grows at the edges of the eyelid and protects the eye from dirt. The eyelash is to humans, camels, horses, ostriches etc., what whiskers are to cats; they are used to sense when dirt, dust, or any other potentially harmful object is too close to the eye.
An eyelash or simply lash is one of the hairs that grows at the edge of the eyelid.

Body hair

androgenic hairpilositybody
The body has different types of hair, including vellus hair and androgenic hair, each with its own type of cellular construction.
It is differentiated from the head hair and less visible vellus hair, which is much finer and lighter in color.

Dust

road dustdust controlhouse dust
The eyelash is to humans, camels, horses, ostriches etc., what whiskers are to cats; they are used to sense when dirt, dust, or any other potentially harmful object is too close to the eye.
Dust in homes, offices, and other human environments contains small amounts of plant pollen, human and animal hairs, textile fibers, paper fibers, minerals from outdoor soil, human skin cells, burnt meteorite particles, and many other materials which may be found in the local environment.

Huxley's layer

The bulb of hair consists of fibrous connective tissue, glassy membrane, external root sheath, internal root sheath composed of epithelium stratum (Henle's layer) and granular stratum (Huxley's layer), cuticle, cortex and medulla.
Huxley's layer is the second layer of the inner root sheath of the hair consists of one or two layers of horny, flattened, nucleated cells.

Skin

cutaneousskin cellanimal skin
Also located within the reticular region are the roots of the hair, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, receptors, nails, and blood vessels.

Fur

pelageguard hairpelt
Many mammals have fur and other hairs that serve different functions.
Fur is a thick growth of hair that covers the skin of many animals.

Whiskers

vibrissaewhiskervibrissa
The eyelash is to humans, camels, horses, ostriches etc., what whiskers are to cats; they are used to sense when dirt, dust, or any other potentially harmful object is too close to the eye.
Whiskers or vibrissae (singular: vibrissa; ) are a type of mammalian hair that are typically characterised, anatomically, by their long length, large and well-innervated hair follicle, and by having an identifiable representation in the somatosensory cortex of the brain.

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
Hair is one of the defining characteristics of mammals.
Mammals (from Latin mamma "breast") are vertebrate animals constituting the class Mammalia, and characterized by the presence of mammary glands which in females (and sometimes males ) produce milk for feeding (nursing) their young, a neocortex (a region of the brain), fur or hair, and three middle ear bones.

Human hair growth

catagenhair growthgrowth
Most common interest in hair is focused on hair growth, hair types, and hair care, but hair is also an important biomaterial primarily composed of protein, notably alpha-keratin.
Hair is a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium made of multi-layered flat cells whose rope-like filaments provide structure and strength to the hair shaft.

Human skin

skinoily skinskin aging
On the human body, glabrous skin is found on the ventral portion of the fingers, palms, soles of feet and lips, which are all parts of the body most closely associated with interacting with the world around us, as are the labia minora and glans penis.
There are two general types of skin, hairy and glabrous skin (hairless).

Sole (foot)

solesolessole of the foot
On the human body, glabrous skin is found on the ventral portion of the fingers, palms, soles of feet and lips, which are all parts of the body most closely associated with interacting with the world around us, as are the labia minora and glans penis.
The glabrous skin on the sole of the foot lacks the hair and pigmentation found elsewhere on the body, and it has a high concentration of sweat pores.

Therapsid

TherapsidatherapsidsEutherapsida
An exceptionally well-preserved skull of Estemmenosuchus, a therapsid from the Upper Permian, shows smooth, hairless skin with what appears to be glandular depressions, though as a semi-aquatic species it might not have been particularly useful to determine the integument of terrestrial species.
Recent studies on Permian coprolites showcase that hair was present in at least some therapsids.