A report on Halakha and Ovadia Yosef

A full set of the Babylonian Talmud
Rabbi Yosef in 2007
Sefer Torah at Glockengasse Synagogue (museum exhibits), Cologne
Ovadia Yosef as a child with his family.
Hasidim walk to the synagogue, Rehovot, Israel.
Ovadia Yosef in his youth.
A mixed-gender, egalitarian Conservative service at Robinson's Arch, Western Wall
Ovadia Yosef in 2007
Set of Mishneh Torah
Shulchan Aruch HaRav
Peninei Halakha Set
An illuminated manuscript of Arba'ah Turim from 1435

In 1937, Rabbi Yaakov Dweck sent Yosef to give the daily Ben Ish Hai halakha shiur in his stead at the Ohel Rachel Synagogue for the Persian Jewish community in the Beit Yisrael neighborhood.

- Ovadia Yosef

Yalkut Yosef, by rabbi Yitzhak Yosef, is a voluminous, widely cited and contemporary work of halakha, based on the rulings of rabbi Ovadia Yosef (1920 - 2013).

- Halakha
A full set of the Babylonian Talmud

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Toledot HaPoskim, History of the Jewish Codes, by Chaim Tchernowitz.

Posek

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Toledot HaPoskim, History of the Jewish Codes, by Chaim Tchernowitz.

Posek (פוסק, pl. poskim, ) is the term in Jewish law for a "decisor", a legal scholar who determines the position of halakha, the Jewish religious laws derived from the written and Oral Torah in cases of Jewish law where previous authorities are inconclusive, or in those situations where no clear halakhic precedent exists.

Ovadia Yosef (1920–2013), Yabbia Omer

Yitzhak Yosef

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Yitzhak Yosef (יצחק יוסף, born January 16, 1952) is the Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel (known as the Rishon LeZion), the rosh yeshiva of Yeshivat Hazon Ovadia, and the author of a set of books on halakha (Jewish law) called Yalkut Yosef.

Yosef is the son of Ovadia Yosef, former Chief Rabbi of Israel, and bases his halakhic rulings on his father's methodology.

Yalkut Yosef

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Yalkut Yosef (ילקוט יוסף, "Collation of Yosef") is an authoritative, contemporary work of Halakha, providing a detailed explanation of the Shulchan Aruch as based on the halachic rulings of the former Rishon LeTzion Rav Ovadia Yosef.

Haredi Jewish men during a Torah reading.

Haredi Judaism

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Haredi Jewish men during a Torah reading.
Young Haredi Jews in Jerusalem, 2005
Hasidic boys in Łódź, 1910
Haredi Jews from Galicia at the in Vienna's second district, Leopoldstadt, 1915
Haredi Jewish women and girls in Mea Shearim, Jerusalem, 2013
Styles of Haredi dress
Typical Haredi dress for men and women
Gender-separate beach in Israel. To accommodate Haredi and other Orthodox Jews, many coastal resorts in Israel have a designated area for sex-separate bathing.
The Bais Yaakov graduating class of 1934 in Łódź, Poland
Tziporah Heller, a weekly columnist for Hamodia
photograph of the Warsaw Ghetto
Members of Neturei Karta protest against Israel (Washington, 2005)
Haredi demonstration against the conscription of yeshiva pupils
Hasidim walk to the synagogue, Rehovot, Israel.
Haredi Rabbis and students writing a Torah scroll (Haredi settlement of Beitar Illit, Gush Etzion)
Hasidic family on the street in Borough Park, Brooklyn
Students of Telshe yeshiva, 1936

Haredi Judaism (יהדות חֲרֵדִית , ; also spelled Charedi in English; plural Haredim or Charedim) consists of groups within Orthodox Judaism that are characterized by their strict adherence to halakha (Jewish law) and traditions, in opposition to modern values and practices.

3) The second wave began in the 1970s associated with the religious revival of the so-called baal teshuva movement, although most of the newly religious become Orthodox, and not necessarily fully Haredi. The formation and spread of the Sephardic Haredi lifestyle movement also began in the 1980s by Ovadia Yosef, alongside the establishment of the Shas party in 1984. This led many Sephardi Jews to adopt the clothing and culture of the Lithuanian Haredi Judaism, though it had no historical basis in their own tradition. Many yeshivas were also established specifically for new adopters of the Haredi way of life.

Statue of the Sephardic philosopher Maimonides, in Córdoba, Spain

Sephardi Jews

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Sepharadi Jews (יהדות ספרד, ; Djudíos Sefardíes), also known as Sephardic Jews or Sepharadim, and sometimes referred to by modern scholars as Hispanic Jews,

Sepharadi Jews (יהדות ספרד, ; Djudíos Sefardíes), also known as Sephardic Jews or Sepharadim, and sometimes referred to by modern scholars as Hispanic Jews,

Statue of the Sephardic philosopher Maimonides, in Córdoba, Spain
Jewish Festival in Tetuan, Alfred Dehodencq, 1865, Paris Museum of Jewish Art and History
Sephardi Jewish couple from Sarajevo in traditional clothing (1900)
A 1902 Issue of La Epoca, a Ladino newspaper from Salonica (Thessaloniki)
19th-century Moroccan Sephardic wedding dress.
First Cemetery of the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, Shearith Israel (1656–1833) in Manhattan, New York City
Emma Lazarus, American poet. Born into a large New York Sephardi family.
Sephardi family from Misiones Province, Argentina, circa 1900.
The Expulsion of the Jews from Spain (in the year 1492) by Emilio Sala Francés
Dedication at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem written in Hebrew, English, Yiddish, and Judeo-Spanish
13th-century depiction of a Jew and Muslim playing chess in Al-Andalus
Observing the Havdalah ritual, 14th-century Spain
A representation of the 1506 Jewish Massacre in Lisbon.
Interior of the Portuguese synagogue in Amsterdam, c. 1680
Execution of Mariana de Carabajal in Mexico City, daughter of Francisca Nuñez de Carabajal, in 1601 by the Santo Oficio.
A young woman weeps during the deportation of Jews of Ioannina (Greece) on 25 March 1944.

In 2011 Rabbi Nissim Karelitz, a leading rabbi and Halachic authority and chairman of the Beit Din Tzedek rabbinical court in Bnei Brak, Israel, recognized the entire Xuete community of Bnei Anusim in Palma de Mallorca, as Jews.

Ovadiah Yosef

Beta Israel

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Currently divided between the modern-day Amhara and Tigray regions of Ethiopia.

Currently divided between the modern-day Amhara and Tigray regions of Ethiopia.

Raphael Hadane, the Liqa Kahenat (High priest) of Beta Israel in Israel
Beta Israel women in Israel
A Kes celebrating the holiday of Sigd in Jerusalem, 2008
Public appeal of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel to save the Jews of Ethiopia, 1921, signed by Abraham Isaac Kook and Jacob Meir.
Migration Map of Beta Israel
Israeli PM Yitzhak Shamir greets new immigrants from Ethiopia, 1991.
Israeli Border Policeman
A bride and groom in Jerusalem
Missionary Henry Aaron Stern preaches Christianity to Beta Israel.
The Beta Israel Memorial Aliya in Kiryat Gat
Falash Mura woman making Injera in Gondar in 1996.
Falash Mura child, 2005

After halakhic (Jewish law) and constitutional discussions, Israeli officials decided, in 1977, that the Israeli Law of Return was to be applied to the Beta Israel.

In 1973, Ovadia Yosef, the Sephardi chief rabbi of Israel ruled, based on the writings of David ben Solomon ibn Abi Zimra and other accounts, that the Beta Israel were Jews and should be brought to Israel.

Gentile

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Word that usually means "someone who is not a Jew".

Word that usually means "someone who is not a Jew".

Under rabbinic law, a modern-day gentile is only required to observe the Seven Laws of Noah, but Jews are required to observe Mosaic law.

Similar anti-gentile remarks have been expressed by the late chief Sephardi Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, in which he stated in a sermon in 2010 that "The sole purpose of Gentiles is to serve Jews".