Haldane Reforms

HaldaneHaldane's Reformsreformsmilitary reformsreform of defence policyRichard HaldaneTerritorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907Territorial Forcethe Haldane Reforms
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.wikipedia
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British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.
The 1907 Haldane Reforms created the Territorial Force as the army's volunteer reserve component, merging and reorganising the Volunteer Force, Militia and Yeomanry.

Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907

military reformsSpecial Reserve of OfficersTerritorial and Reserve Forces Act
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.
This reorganisation formed a major part of the Haldane Reforms, named after the creator of the Act, Richard Haldane.

Officers' Training Corps

OTCOfficer Training CorpsUOTC
To encourage the development of military skills, an Officer Training Corps was established in public schools and universities.
In October 1908, therefore, authorised by Army Order 160 of July 1908, as part the Haldane Reforms of the Reserve forces, the contingents were formally established as the Officers' Training Corps and incorporated into the new Territorial Force, which was created by the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.

Richard Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane

Richard HaldaneLord HaldaneViscount Haldane
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.
He was Secretary of State for War between 1905 and 1912 during which time the "Haldane Reforms" of the British Army were implemented.

Childers Reforms

reforms1881Childers
They were the first major reforms since the "Childers Reforms" of the early 1880s, and were made in the light of lessons newly learned in the Second Boer War.
Haldane Reforms

Special Reserve

(Extra Reserve)Extra Reservereserve
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.
Its formation was part of the military reforms implemented by Richard Haldane, the Secretary of State for War, which also created the Territorial Force.

British Expeditionary Force (World War I)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFExpeditionary Force
The outbreak of the First World War in August 1914 saw the bulk of the changes put to the test; the Expeditionary Force of six divisions was quickly sent to the Continent, whilst a Territorial Force of 14 divisions and Reserves were mobilised as planned to provide a second line.
Planning for a British Expeditionary Force began with the Haldane reforms of the British Army carried out by the Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War (1899–1902).

Cardwell Reforms

Cardwell1881a large-scale reform of army institutions
The second wave was from 1868 to 1872, comprising a collection of administrative changes popularly known as the "Cardwell Reforms" after the then Secretary of State for War, Edward Cardwell.
The Haldane Reforms were made in 1906–1912.

Secretary of State for War

War SecretarySecretaries of State for WarWar Minister
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.

Expeditionary warfare

expeditionary forceexpeditionaryexpeditionary forces
The major element of the reforms was the creation of an expeditionary force, specifically prepared and trained for intervening in a major war.

Yeomanry

Yeomanry CavalryYeomanYeoman Cavalry
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.

Territorial Force

territorialTFT.F.
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.

Chief of the General Staff (United Kingdom)

Chief of the General StaffChief of the Imperial General StaffCIGS
Military strategy was revitalised by a new Imperial General Staff, which would ensure a common doctrine and common strategic aims among the various military forces of the British Empire, including the Dominions as well as British India.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
Military strategy was revitalised by a new Imperial General Staff, which would ensure a common doctrine and common strategic aims among the various military forces of the British Empire, including the Dominions as well as British India.

Dominion

Dominionsdominion statusBritish Dominion
Military strategy was revitalised by a new Imperial General Staff, which would ensure a common doctrine and common strategic aims among the various military forces of the British Empire, including the Dominions as well as British India.

Presidencies and provinces of British India

IndiaBritish IndiaBritish
Military strategy was revitalised by a new Imperial General Staff, which would ensure a common doctrine and common strategic aims among the various military forces of the British Empire, including the Dominions as well as British India.

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig

Douglas HaigSir Douglas HaigHaig
Finally, the Regular Army itself would be reformed by the development of a new operational and training doctrine, laid down in Douglas Haig's new Field Service Pocket Book.

Crimean War

CrimeaCrimeanCrimean campaign
In the middle of the 19th century, the British Army had seen two major operations in close succession - the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny - and it had become apparent that the existing organisation of the forces was not sufficient for large-scale modern warfare.

Indian Rebellion of 1857

Indian MutinyIndian Rebellion1857 uprising
In the middle of the 19th century, the British Army had seen two major operations in close succession - the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny - and it had become apparent that the existing organisation of the forces was not sufficient for large-scale modern warfare.

Staff college

Staff CourseArmy Staff CollegeImperial War College
This period saw the creation of the Staff College, which helped to turn officers in the upper reaches of the Army into professional soldiers; the transformation of the old East India Company army into the Indian Army to better control the forces in India; and the creation of the Volunteer Force to help with home defence whilst the Regular Army was overseas.

East India Company

British East India CompanyBritishHonourable East India Company
This period saw the creation of the Staff College, which helped to turn officers in the upper reaches of the Army into professional soldiers; the transformation of the old East India Company army into the Indian Army to better control the forces in India; and the creation of the Volunteer Force to help with home defence whilst the Regular Army was overseas.

British Indian Army

Indian ArmyIndianreforms
This period saw the creation of the Staff College, which helped to turn officers in the upper reaches of the Army into professional soldiers; the transformation of the old East India Company army into the Indian Army to better control the forces in India; and the creation of the Volunteer Force to help with home defence whilst the Regular Army was overseas.

Volunteer Force

VolunteerVolunteersVolunteer Movement
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907. This period saw the creation of the Staff College, which helped to turn officers in the upper reaches of the Army into professional soldiers; the transformation of the old East India Company army into the Indian Army to better control the forces in India; and the creation of the Volunteer Force to help with home defence whilst the Regular Army was overseas.

Regular army

regularregularsregular troops
This period saw the creation of the Staff College, which helped to turn officers in the upper reaches of the Army into professional soldiers; the transformation of the old East India Company army into the Indian Army to better control the forces in India; and the creation of the Volunteer Force to help with home defence whilst the Regular Army was overseas.

Edward Cardwell, 1st Viscount Cardwell

Edward Cardwell The Right Honourable '''Edward CardwellCardwell
The second wave was from 1868 to 1872, comprising a collection of administrative changes popularly known as the "Cardwell Reforms" after the then Secretary of State for War, Edward Cardwell.