Haldane Reforms

HaldaneHaldane's Reformsreformsreform of defence policyTerritorial ForceRichard Haldanemilitary reformsTerritorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907the Haldane Reforms
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.wikipedia
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Officers' Training Corps

OTCOfficer Training CorpsUOTC
To encourage the development of military skills, an Officer Training Corps was established in public schools and universities.
In October 1908, therefore, authorised by Army Order 160 of July 1908, as part the Haldane Reforms of the Reserve forces, the contingents were formally established as the Officers' Training Corps and incorporated into the new Territorial Force, which was created by the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.

Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907

military reformsTerritorial and Reserve Forces ActSpecial Reserve of Officers
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.
This reorganisation formed a major part of the Haldane Reforms, named after the creator of the Act, Richard Haldane.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.
The 1907 Haldane Reforms created the Territorial Force as the army's volunteer reserve component, merging and reorganising the Volunteer Force, Militia and Yeomanry.

Richard Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane

Richard HaldaneLord HaldaneViscount Haldane
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane.
He was Secretary of State for War between 1905 and 1912 during which time the "Haldane Reforms" of the British Army were implemented.

Special Reserve

Reserve and Special Reserve(Extra Reserve)Extra Reserve
To ensure that home defence would not suffer from sending the regular forces overseas, the Militia formed the Special Reserve and the Volunteer Force and the Yeomanry were reorganised into a new Territorial Force; these latter two reforms were grouped together in the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907.
Its formation was part of the military reforms implemented by Richard Haldane, the Secretary of State for War, which also created the Territorial Force.

British Expeditionary Force (World War I)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFExpeditionary Force
The outbreak of the First World War in August 1914 saw the bulk of the changes put to the test; the Expeditionary Force of six divisions was quickly sent to the Continent, whilst a Territorial Force of 14 divisions and Reserves were mobilised as planned to provide a second line.
Planning for a British Expeditionary Force began with the Haldane reforms of the British Army carried out by the Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War (1899–1902).

Childers Reforms

reforms1881Childers
They were the first major reforms since the "Childers Reforms" of the early 1880s, and were made in the light of lessons newly learned in the Second Boer War.
Haldane Reforms

Cardwell Reforms

Cardwell1881Cardwell schemes of army reform
The second wave was from 1868 to 1872, comprising a collection of administrative changes popularly known as the "Cardwell Reforms" after the then Secretary of State for War, Edward Cardwell.
The Haldane Reforms were made in 1906–1912.

Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Oxfordshire Light InfantryOxford and Bucks Light InfantryOx & Bucks Light Infantry
In 1908, as part of the Haldane Reforms, the regiment's title was altered to become the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, commonly shortened to the Ox and Bucks and the 4th battalion and the 1st Buckinghamshire battalion were formed, both originally county volunteer units, and they became part of a new Territorial Force, later the Territorial Army (TA).

British Expeditionary Force order of battle (1914)

British Expeditionary ForceBritain''': 247,400 men
The Haldane Reforms of 1907, formally created an Expeditionary force and the Territorial Force.

List of pals battalions

The Bradford Pals3rd Salford PalsHull Commercials
He eschewed the Territorial Forcepartly due to the limitations imposed by its terms of service but also due to the poor impression he formed when observing the French Territorials in the Franco-Prussian Warand did not make use of the framework envisioned by Haldane's Reforms.

3rd North Midland Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

III North Midland Brigade, RFA2/III North Midland BrigadeCCXCVII Brigade, RFA (T.F.)
When the Territorial Force (TF) was created from the former Volunteer Force by the Haldane Reforms in 1908, it was organised into regional infantry divisions, each with a full establishment of Royal Field Artillery (RFA) brigades.

4th North Midland Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

1st Derbyshire Howitzer BatteryCCXCVIII Brigade, RFA (T.F.)CCXXXIII (4th NM) Bde
When the Territorial Force (TF) was created from the former Volunteer Force by the Haldane Reforms in 1908, it was organised into regional infantry divisions, each with a full establishment of Royal Field Artillery (RFA) brigades.

London Heavy Brigade, Royal Garrison Artillery

53rd (London) Medium Regiment, RA353 (London) Medium Regiment2/2nd London Heavy Battery
When the Territorial Force was created in 1908 by the Haldane Reforms, each infantry division was allocated a heavy battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA).

20th Battalion, London Regiment (Blackheath and Woolwich)

2/20th Battalion, London Regiment20th Battalion34th (The Queen's Own Royal West Kent) Anti-Aircraft Battalion
The London Regiment was created in 1908 as part of the Haldane Reforms, and consisted entirely of Territorial Force (TF) infantry battalions, with no Regular component.

5th Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

53rd (King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery1/5th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry)57th (King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) Light A.A. Regiment, RA
The battalion was formed in 1908 when the Volunteer Force was subsumed into the new Territorial Force (TF) under the Haldane Reforms.

2nd Welsh Brigade, Royal Field Artillery

77th (Welsh) HAA Rgt77th (Welsh) Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RAII Welsh Brigade
The creation of the Territorial Force under the Haldane Reforms of 1908 saw a widespread reorganisation of existing Volunteer Force units.

50th (Northumbrian) Division

Northumbrian Division50th Division50th (Northumbrian) Divisional Area
Under the Haldane Reforms of the Army of 1908, the Territorial Force was formed and organised into 14 regional divisions, each with area brigades and local battalions.

7th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers

39th (Lancashire Fusiliers) S/L Rgt39th (The Lancashire Fusiliers) Anti-Aircraft Battalion, RE (TA)1/7th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers
On the formation of the Territorial Force (TF) under the Haldane Reforms in 1908, the 3rd VB formed two battalions of the Lancashire Fusiliers, the 7th and 8th.

6th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

2/6th Battalion1/6th Battalion69th (The Royal Warwickshire Regiment) Anti-Aircraft Brigade RA (TA)
When the Volunteers were subsumed into the Territorial Force (TF) in 1908 as part of the Haldane Reforms, the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Birmingham Rifles became the 5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment and 6th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment respectively and adopted the red uniform with blue facings of the Royal Warwickshires.

West Riding Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery

54th (West Riding & Staffordshire) Medium Brigade, Royal Artillery3rd Yorkshire (West Riding) Artillery Volunteer Corps54th (West Riding and Staffordshire) Medium Brigade, RGA
When the Territorial Force (TF) was created in 1908 by the Haldane Reforms, each infantry division was allocated a heavy battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA).

2nd Cinque Ports Artillery Volunteers

58th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery114th (Sussex) Field Regiment114th (Sussex) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
When the Volunteers were subsumed into the new Territorial Force (TF) under the Haldane Reforms of 1908, the 2nd Cinque Ports RGA merged with the 2nd Sussex RGA and transferred to the Royal Field Artillery (RFA) to form the II (or 2nd) Home Counties Brigade with the following organisation:

South Midland (Warwickshire) Royal Garrison Artillery

2/1st South Midland (Warwicks) Heavy BatterySouth Midland (Warwickshire) Heavy Battery95th (Birmingham) Heavy Anti–Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery
When the Territorial Force (TF) was created in 1908 as part of the Haldane Reforms, each of its infantry divisions included a heavy artillery battery in its establishment.

Northamptonshire Battery, Royal Field Artillery

1/1st Northamptonshire Battery336 (Northampton) Battery336th (Northamptonshire) Field Bty (Howitzer)
When the Volunteer Force was subsumed into the new Territorial Force (TF) as part of the Haldane reforms of 1908, the bulk of the 1st Volunteer Bn became the 4th Bn Northamptonshire Regiment, but the two Peterborough companies were converted to form the Northamptonshire Battery of the Royal Field Artillery and the East Midland Brigade Company of the Army Service Corps.

2nd Kent Artillery Volunteers

91st (4th London) Field Regiment, Royal Artillery139th (4th London) Jungle Field Regiment4th London Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
When the Volunteers were subsumed into the new Territorial Force (TF) under the Haldane Reforms of 1908, the 2nd Kent RGA was split to form two howitzer brigades in the Royal Field Artillery (RFA), the IV London at Lewisham, and the VIII London at Plumstead.