Halfpenny (British pre-decimal coin)

halfpennyhalfpenniesha'pennyhalf pennyhalfpenceBritish halfpennyha'pennieshalf-penny½dhalfpenny coin
The British pre-decimal halfpenny (1⁄2d) coin, usually simply known as a halfpenny (pronounced ), historically occasionally also as the obol, was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1⁄480 of a pound sterling.wikipedia
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£shillings and pence per poundd
The British pre-decimal halfpenny (1⁄2d) coin, usually simply known as a halfpenny (pronounced ), historically occasionally also as the obol, was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1⁄480 of a pound sterling.
The penny was subdivided into 4 farthings until 31 December 1960, when they ceased to be legal tender in the UK, and until 31 July 1969 there were also halfpennies ("ha'pennies") in circulation.

Britannia

BritainBritannia BarbaraWest Britannia
From 1672 until 1936 the image of Britannia appeared on the reverse, and from 1937 onwards the image of the Golden Hind appeared. The original reverse of the bronze version of the coin, designed by Leonard Charles Wyon, is a seated Britannia, holding a trident, with the words HALF PENNY to either side.
Although the archetypical image of Britannia seated with a shield first appeared on Roman bronze coins of the 1st century AD struck under Hadrian, Britannia's first appearance on British coinage was on the farthing in 1672, though earlier pattern versions had appeared in 1665, followed by the halfpenny later the same year.

Pound sterling

£poundspounds sterling
The British pre-decimal halfpenny (1⁄2d) coin, usually simply known as a halfpenny (pronounced ), historically occasionally also as the obol, was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1⁄480 of a pound sterling.
Although some fractions of the penny were struck (see farthing and halfpenny), it was more common to find pennies cut into halves and quarters to provide smaller change.

Decimal Day

decimalisationdecimalizationdecimalised
"Halfpenny" was colloquially written ha’penny, and "1 1⁄2d" was spoken as "a penny ha’penny" or three ha'pence . Before Decimal Day in 1971 there were 240 pence in one pound sterling.
The old halfpenny was withdrawn from circulation on 31 July 1969, and the half-crown (2s 6d) followed on 31 December to ease the transition.

Golden Hind

PelicanGolden HindeThe Golden Hind
From 1672 until 1936 the image of Britannia appeared on the reverse, and from 1937 onwards the image of the Golden Hind appeared. The pattern coin of Edward VIII and regular issue halfpennies of George VI and Elizabeth II feature a redesigned reverse displaying Sir Francis Drake's ship the Golden Hind.
Halfpenny (British pre-decimal coin), which featured a depiction of the Golden Hind from 1937–67

Humphrey Paget

Thomas H. Paget
Originally intended for the halfcrown, it was adopted for the halfpenny in 1937 where it remained until decimalisation took place in 1971.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
The British pre-decimal halfpenny (1⁄2d) coin, usually simply known as a halfpenny (pronounced ), historically occasionally also as the obol, was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1⁄480 of a pound sterling.

Denarius

denariidinaraDinari
denarius, a common coin in Roman Britain).

Obverse and reverse

obversereverseobverses
The original reverse of the bronze version of the coin, designed by Leonard Charles Wyon, is a seated Britannia, holding a trident, with the words HALF PENNY to either side.

Leonard Charles Wyon

L.C. WyonL. C. WyonLeonard C. Wyon
The original reverse of the bronze version of the coin, designed by Leonard Charles Wyon, is a seated Britannia, holding a trident, with the words HALF PENNY to either side.

Francis Drake

Sir Francis DrakeDrakeDrake, Francis
The pattern coin of Edward VIII and regular issue halfpennies of George VI and Elizabeth II feature a redesigned reverse displaying Sir Francis Drake's ship the Golden Hind.

Northern England

North of EnglandNorthernNorth
*wikt:ha'porth: Northern British English, from British English "half-penny’s worth", often used in the phrase "daft ha’porth".

British English

BritishEnglishUK
*wikt:ha'porth: Northern British English, from British English "half-penny’s worth", often used in the phrase "daft ha’porth".

Mary Gillick

Mary Gaskell GillickMary Gaskell Gillick OBEMary Tutin

Charles Dickens

DickensDickensianDickens, Charles
Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.

St Patrick halfpenny

The St Patrick halfpenny was a milled coin minted in the 17th century in England, Ireland and Wales.

History of the English penny (c. 600 – 1066)

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In the early 870s the first round halfpennies were produced under Alfred the Great and Ceolwulf II of Mercia; these were produced sporadically and in small quantity until Edgar’s reform of the 970s, after which it became common to cut whole pennies into halves and quarters, often at the time of production.

Bouquet sou

Roughly equivalent in value to a half penny, the "bouquet sou" were so called because they displayed a group of heraldic flowers tied together with a ribbon on their obverse.

List of newspapers in the United Kingdom by circulation

daily circulationmost widely read newspapernewspaper circulation size
The press was changed by the introduction of halfpenny papers.

Coins of the Canadian dollar

Canadian coinsCanadian coincoin
For example, the large Canadian penny was identical in size and value to the contemporary British half-penny, which was 25.4 mm in the Edward VII version, and slightly larger during Victoria's reign.

Psychological pricing

99¢Customary pricejust-below pricing
In the UK, before the withdrawal of the halfpenny coin in 1969, prices often ended in 111⁄2d (elevenpence halfpenny: just under a shilling, which was 12d); another example was £1/19/11¾d.

Daily Mirror

The MirrorThe Daily MirrorMirror
Two days later, the price was dropped to one halfpenny and to the masthead was added: "A paper for men and women".