Halych

HaliczGalichGalicianHalichGalychHaliceHalych PowiatHalytskaLand of Halicz
Halych (Га́лич ; Halici; Halicz; Га́лич; Halytsch) is a historic city on the Dniester River in western Ukraine.wikipedia
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Western Ukraine

West UkrainewesternWestern Ukrainian
Halych (Га́лич ; Halici; Halicz; Га́лич; Halytsch) is a historic city on the Dniester River in western Ukraine.
Important cities are Buchach, Chernivtsi, Drohobych, Halych (hence - Halychyna), Ivano-Frankivsk, Khotyn, Lutsk, Lviv, Mukacheve, Rivne, Ternopil, Uzhhorod and others.

Lviv

LwówLembergLvov
The city gave its name to the Principality of Halych, the historic province of Galicia (Halychyna), and the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, of which it was the capital until the early 14th century, when the seat of the local rulers moved to Lviv.
In 1412, the local archdiocese has developed into the Roman Catholic Metropolis, which since 1375 as diocese had been in Halych.

Halych Raion

HalychDenys SichynskyHalych District
It functions as the administrative center of Halych Raion (district) of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast (region).
The town of Halych serves as the administrative center of the district.

Principality of Halych

HalychPrince of HalychHalychian Rus
The city gave its name to the Principality of Halych, the historic province of Galicia (Halychyna), and the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, of which it was the capital until the early 14th century, when the seat of the local rulers moved to Lviv. In 1141 Prince (knyaz) Volodymyrko Volodarovych (1104–1152) who united the competing principalities of Przemyśl, Zvenyhorod and Terebovlya into the state of Halychyna transferred his capital from Zvenyhorod to Halych making it the seat of his Rurikid dynasty and considerably expanding the settlement.
The four sons of the Rostystlavych Brothers divided the area into four parts with centers in Przemysl (Rostislav), Zvenyhorod (Volodymyrko), Halych and Terebovlia (Ivan and Yuriy).

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
The city's name, though spelled identically in modern East Slavic languages, is pronounced Halych in Ukrainian and Galich in Russian.
As evidenced by the contemporary chronicles, the ruling princes of Galich (modern Halych) and Kiev called themselves "People of Rus'" (with the exact Cyrillic spelling of the adjective from of Rus' varying among sources), which contrasts sharply with the lack of ethnic self-appellation for the area until the mid-19th century.

Ivano-Frankivsk

StanisławówStanislauStanislaviv
It lies 26 km north of the oblast capital, Ivano-Frankivsk.
Other cities that lie in the radius of 25 to 30 km are Tlumach (east), Nadvirna (south), Kalush (west), and Halych (north).

Galich, Russia

GalichGalich-Mersky
The Russian transliteration should not be confused with the Russian town of Galich.
It gradually developed into one of the greatest salt-mining centers of Eastern Europe, eclipsing the southern town of Halych, from which it takes its name.

Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast

Ivano-FrankivskIvano-Frankivsk regionStanislav Oblast
It functions as the administrative center of Halych Raion (district) of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast (region).
The oblast has 15 cities which are (alphabetical order): Bolekhiv, Burshtyn, Dolyna, Halych, Horodenka, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kalush, Kolomyia, Kosiv, Nadvirna, Rohatyn, Sniatyn, Tlumach, Tysmenytsia, and Yaremche.

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychyna
The city gave its name to the Principality of Halych, the historic province of Galicia (Halychyna), and the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, of which it was the capital until the early 14th century, when the seat of the local rulers moved to Lviv.
The area, named after the medieval city of Halych, was first mentioned in Hungarian historical chronicles in the year 1206 as Galiciæ.

Primary Chronicle

Russian Primary ChronicleTale of Bygone YearsNestor Chronicle
The most comprehensive records about Halych are found in the Hypatian Codex of the Primary Chronicle.
It was written in what are today Ukrainian lands and incorporates much information from the lost 12th-century Kievan and 13th-century Halychian chronicles.

Krylos

The central part of the human settlement with the Dormition Cathedral and princely chambers was fortified with powerful vallums and moats and was located over Lukva River (Dniester's tributary) at the place of contemporary village of Krylos.
It is located 5 km south of modern Halych and is part of the National preserve Ancient Halych.

Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia

Galicia-VolhyniaGalicia–VolhyniaHalych-Volhynia
The city gave its name to the Principality of Halych, the historic province of Galicia (Halychyna), and the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, of which it was the capital until the early 14th century, when the seat of the local rulers moved to Lviv.
In Roman's time Galicia–Volhynia's principal cities were Halych and Volodymyr-in-Volhynia.

Batu Khan

BatuKhan BatuMongol invasion
The Mongols under Batu Khan took the capital in 1241, when the famous King Danylo was its ruler.
Thereupon Batu Khan divided his army into smaller units, which ransacked fourteen Rus' cities: Rostov, Uglich, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Kashin, Ksnyatin, Gorodets, Halych, Pereslavl-Zalessky, Yuriev-Polsky, Dmitrov, Volokolamsk, Tver, and Torzhok.

Volodymyrko Volodarovych

VladimirkoVolodymyrko of HalychVladimir Volodarevich
In 1141 Prince (knyaz) Volodymyrko Volodarovych (1104–1152) who united the competing principalities of Przemyśl, Zvenyhorod and Terebovlya into the state of Halychyna transferred his capital from Zvenyhorod to Halych making it the seat of his Rurikid dynasty and considerably expanding the settlement.
Gradually united Peremyshl, Zvenyhorod, Halych and Terebovlia land at one Principality of Halych.

Chełm

ChelmKholmCholm
Five years later, Pope Gregory XI created in Avignon the Archdiocese of Halicz, which controlled the Dioceses of Kholm (Chełm), Peremyshl (Przemyśl) and Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Włodzimierz Wołyński).
In 1235, Danylo Romanovych of Halych granted the town a city charter and moved the capital of his domain in 1241–1272 after destruction of Halych by Mongols in 1240–1241.

Casimir III the Great

Casimir III of PolandKazimierz WielkiCasimir the Great
In 1349, following the death of Duke Bolesław Jerzy II of Mazovia and the Galicia–Volhynia Wars, Halych was annexed by Polish King Casimir III the Great.
He waged many victorious wars and doubled the size of the kingdom, mostly through addition of lands in modern-day Ukraine (then called the Duchy of Halych).

Yaroslav Osmomysl

Yaroslav Volodimerovich Osmomysl of HalychYaroslav Vladimirovich "OsmomyslDuke Jaroslav Osmomysl
The first dynasty of Halych, descending from Vladimir of Novgorod, a Rurik family branch known as Rostislavichi, culminated in Yaroslav Osmomysl (1153–1187) – after whose rule Béla III of Hungary briefly conquered the Principality in 1188—before going extinct in 1199.
Originally, he was buried in the Assumption Cathedral in ancient Halych (now the village of Krylos, in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, Ukraine).

Western jackdaw

jackdawEurasian jackdawjackdaws
Max Vasmer and modern Slavists generally agree that "Halych" is an adjective derived from the East Slavic word for "jackdaw," "halka."
The jackdaw is featured on the Ukrainian town of Halych's ancient coat of arms, the town's name allegedly being derived from the East Slavic word for the bird.

Ruthenian Voivodeship

Ruthenian VoivodshipRutheniavoivode of Ruthenia
In the Kingdom of Poland, Halich remained one of main administrative centers of the Ruthenian Voivodeship.
Later on, Halych emerged as the capital of the province, while the city of Lwów was founded only in 1250.

Vladislaus II of Opole

Władysław OpolczykWładysław of OpoleWładysław II
After King Casimir's death (1370), Louis I, King of Poland and Hungary subjected Red Ruthenia to the authority of Hungarian-appointed starostas, overlooked by Duke Vladislaus II of Opole.
Vladislaus mainly resided in Lviv, but at the end of his rule he spent more time in Halych.

Daniel of Galicia

Danylo of HalychDaniel of HalychDaniil Romanovich
The Mongols under Batu Khan took the capital in 1241, when the famous King Danylo was its ruler.

Sejmik

sejmik generalnylocal assembliesassemblies of landed nobility
In 1564, the Sejm in Warsaw created a sejmik in Halicz, which ruled over the Ziemia of Halicz, including the powiats of Halicz, Trembowla and Kolomyja.

Ziemia

LandLandsLand of Busk
In 1564, the Sejm in Warsaw created a sejmik in Halicz, which ruled over the Ziemia of Halicz, including the powiats of Halicz, Trembowla and Kolomyja.

Bohdan Khmelnytsky

Bohdan KhmelnytskyiBogdan KhmelnitskyBohdan Khmelnitsky
In 1649, Halicz was once again destroyed by Cossacks of Bohdan Khmelnytsky, further destruction took place in 1676, during the Polish–Ottoman War (1672–76).
In February 1649, during negotiations in Pereiaslav with a Polish delegation headed by Senator Adam Kysil, Khmelnytsky declared that he was "the sole autocrat of Rus" and that he had "enough power in Ukraine, Podilia, and Volhynia... in his land and principality stretching as far as Lviv, Chełm, and Halych."