Ham House

Ham
Ham House is a historic house with formal gardens set back 200 metres from the River Thames in Ham, south of Richmond in London.wikipedia
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Petersham, London

PetershamPetersham, Surrey
When George Cole had to sell his property in Petersham as part of the enclosure of Richmond Park in 1637, he made over the remaining leases of the Manors of Ham and Petersham to Murray.
It provides the foreground of the scenic view from Richmond Hill across Petersham Meadows, with Ham House further along the river.

William Murray, 1st Earl of Dysart

William MurrayWilliam Murray, later 1st Earl of Dysart
In 1626, Ham House was leased to William Murray, whipping boy and close childhood friend of Charles I.
Charles granted Murray the lease of Ham House, close to the palace at Richmond, London and conveniently situated for access to the palaces in London, Hampton Court and Windsor and it was here that Murray established his family.

Ham, London

HamHam, SurreyHam Common
Ham House is a historic house with formal gardens set back 200 metres from the River Thames in Ham, south of Richmond in London.
Between the Royal Courts at Richmond and Hampton Court, Ham's predominantly agricultural area developed from the beginning of the 17th century, with the construction of Ham House in 1610, the best-preserved survivor of the period.

Canbury

Canbury Manor
The neighbouring Manor of Canbury (Kingston) was also granted to William in 1640, but, in 1641, he passed it to Thomas Bruce, Lord Elgin, a relative of his wife.
Ramsay also held land in Petersham and Ham to the north, living at Ham House.

Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll

Lord IlayDuke of ArgyllLord Archibald Campbell
and their second son, Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll was born in the same room a few years later.
Born at Ham House, Petersham, Surrey, he was the second son of Archibald Campbell, 10th Earl and 1st Duke of Argyll (1658–1703) and his wife Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir Lionel Talmash of Helmingham, Suffolk.

Richmond, London

RichmondRichmond, SurreyRichmond upon Thames
Ham House is a historic house with formal gardens set back 200 metres from the River Thames in Ham, south of Richmond in London.
Skiffs (fixed seat boats) can be hired by the hour from local boat builders close to the bridge, with opportunities to row upstream towards the historic properties Ham House and Marble Hill House.

Lionel Tollemache, 4th Earl of Dysart

4th Earl of DysartLionelLionel Tollemache, 4th Earl of Dysart, 5th Baronet
His only son, Lionel, pre-deceased him in 1712 and, on the 3rd Earl's death in 1727, his grandson, also named Lionel, became the 4th Earl of Dysart.
Lionel's father, a namesake in 1712 predeceased his father Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Earl of Dysart — on the latter's death in 1727, Lionel inherited the earldom and five main estates: Ham House in Surrey, Helmingham Hall in Suffolk, Harrington and Bentley in Northamptonshire, and 20000 acre in Cheshire.

John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll

Duke of ArgyllThe Duke of Argyll2nd Duke of Argyll
Their first child, John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, was born at Ham House in 1680.
Born at Ham House, he was the son of Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll and Elizabeth Campbell (née Tollemache, daughter of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Baronet).

Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Baronet

Sir Lionel TollemacheLionel TollemacheLionel
These, inclusive of Ham House, were bought for £1,131.18s on 13 May 1650 by William Adams, the steward acting on behalf of Murray's eldest daughter, Elizabeth and her husband Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Baronet of Helmingham Hall, Suffolk.
He and his wife, who were both fervent royalists, moved to her house at Ham in Surrey, which in due course became a centre for the activities of the Sealed Knot.

Elizabeth Maitland, Duchess of Lauderdale

Elizabeth Tollemache, 2nd Countess of DysartElizabethElizabeth, 2nd Countess of Dysart
These, inclusive of Ham House, were bought for £1,131.18s on 13 May 1650 by William Adams, the steward acting on behalf of Murray's eldest daughter, Elizabeth and her husband Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Baronet of Helmingham Hall, Suffolk.
Elizabeth did not want a quiet domestic life and based herself at her family home, Ham House near Richmond by the Thames, today in London, then in Surrey, which she spent much time and money redeveloping.

Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Elgin

Thomas Bruce, 3rd Lord KinlossEarl of ElginThomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Elgin, 3rd Lord Kinloss
The neighbouring Manor of Canbury (Kingston) was also granted to William in 1640, but, in 1641, he passed it to Thomas Bruce, Lord Elgin, a relative of his wife.
Shortly before the 1648 outbreak of the Second English Civil War, fellow scot, William Murray, 1st Earl of Dysart, whipping boy of Charles I and husband of his relative, Catherine Bruce, appointed Bruce as principal trustee of Ham House to act on behalf of his wife, Catherine, and their daughters.

Sash window

sashessash windowssash
He undertook extensive repairs of the house, replacing the roof tiles with slates, rebuilding the bays with venetian windows above, replaced mullions with sash windows, and generally repaired decayed timbers, sills and floors where required.
The oldest surviving examples of sash windows were installed in England in the 1670s, for example at Ham House.

Frederick Tollemache

FrederickFrederick James TollemacheHon. Frederick Tollemache
Lionel preferred to live in London and invited his brothers, Frederick and Algernon Gray Tollemache, to manage the estates and Ham and Buckminster.
Frederick James Tollemache (16 April 1804 – 2 July 1888, Ham House) was a British gentleman and politician.

Thomas Vavasour (knight marshal)

Thomas VavasourSir Thomas VavasourThomas
The house was built in 1610 by Sir Thomas Vavasour, Knight Marshal to James I.
Vavasour's wealth and connection to the court allowed the construction of Ham House in 1610.

William Bruce (architect)

Sir William BruceWilliam BruceSir William Bruce of Balcaskie
Elizabeth consulted her cousin, William Bruce, and Maitland commissioned William Samwell, extending the house into the south part of the "H", making it "double pile", two rooms deep, across its breadth.
Lauderdale continued to employ Bruce, often working closely with Lord Haltoun, Lauderdale's brother, during the 1670s, on his homes at Brunstane near Edinburgh, and Lethington (later renamed Lennoxlove), as well as commissioning a design for new gates at his English property, Ham House, near London, in 1671.

Ham Common, London

Ham CommonNo. 1 Ham Common
The formal listed avenues leading to the house from the A307 are formed by more than 250 trees stretching east from the house to the arched gate house at Petersham, and south across the open expanse of Ham Common where it is flanked by a pair of more modest gate houses.
To the west of the Upper Ham Road lies a triangular green of approximately 20 acres, bounded by mature trees and crossed by an avenue that forms part of the southern approach to Ham House.

William Samwell (architect)

William Samwell
Elizabeth consulted her cousin, William Bruce, and Maitland commissioned William Samwell, extending the house into the south part of the "H", making it "double pile", two rooms deep, across its breadth.
In 1672, Samwell and William Bruce enlarged and remodeled Ham House, the residence of John Maitland, 1st Duke of Lauderdale and Elizabeth, 2nd Countess of Dysart.

Wenefryde Scott, 10th Countess of Dysart

Wenefryde ScottWenefryde Agatha GreavesWynefrede
His niece, Wynefrede, daughter of his sister Agnes, inherited the Earldom.
Wenefryde's coming-out ball was hosted by her uncle, the 9th Earl of Dysart, at his seat at Ham House.

Coade stone

Artificial Stone ManufactoryBall clay use in ceramic Coade stone sculptureCoade
Coade stone pineapples were added to decorate the balustrades and John Bacon's iconic statue of the river god, pictured here, also in Coade stone, dates from this period.
Two examples of the River God, one outside Ham House, the other in Terrace Gardens.(Ham House-51.44465°N, -0.3143°W) (Terrace Gardens-51.45399°N, -0.30041°W)

Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll

Archibald Campbell, 10th Earl of ArgyllArchibald Campbell1st Duke of Argyll
The eldest daughter of Elizabeth and Lionel, also named Elizabeth (1659–1735), married Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll in Edinburgh in 1678.
They had three children, born at Ham House outside London:

Wilbraham Tollemache, 6th Earl of Dysart

Wilbraham TollemacheWilbraham6th Earl of Dysart
On his death in 1799 his brother, Wilbraham became the 6th Earl of Dysart.
Wilbraham carried out a program of improvements at Ham House, including the creation of the Yellow Satin Bedroom, demolishing part of the northern wall and opening the view of the house to the river, relocating the busts of Roman Emperors to niches in the house wall, creating the ha-has and the addition of the Coade stone statues.

Lionel Tollemache, 5th Earl of Dysart

LionelLionel TollemacheLionel Tollemache, Lord Huntingtower
Lionel Tollemache, 5th Earl of Dysart succeeded to the title on his father's death.
Charlotte died at Ham House on 5 September 1789.

William Tollemache, 9th Earl of Dysart

Lord Dysart9th Earl of DysartDysart Trustees
Lionel's only son, William, a controversial figure, amassed great debts guaranteed by the expectation of inheriting the family fortune, however, he, too, predeceased his father who subsequently bequeathed the estates to his grandson, William John Manners Tollemache, with his brothers, Frederick and Algernon with Charles Hanbury-Tracy acting as trustees for 21 years to 1899.
Lord Dysart's seats were Ham House, Petersham, Richmond, Surrey, and Buckminster Park, Leicestershire.

Lyonel Tollemache

LyonelLyonellSir Lyonel Tollemache
Wynefrede's cousin, Lyonell, at the age of 81, inherited the baronetcy and the estates at Ham and Buckminster.
On the death of his second cousin, William Tollemache, 9th Earl of Dysart, 3rd Baronet Lyonel succeeded to the Baronetage in 1935 at the age of 81. He inherited Dysart's holding in Buckminster estate and the entirety of Ham House with the surrounding land and property in Petersham, Ham and Canbury and the gravel works at Ham.

Algernon Tollemache

Algernon Gray TollemacheAlgernon Grey TollemacheHon. Algernon Gray Tollemache
Lionel preferred to live in London and invited his brothers, Frederick and Algernon Gray Tollemache, to manage the estates and Ham and Buckminster.
In 1881, Algernon and Frances were living at Ham House but in the years prior to Algernon's death they lived at Wick House, on Richmond Hill.