Handley Page

Handley Page LimitedHandley Page Aircraft CompanyHandley Page LtdHandley Page (Reading) LimitedHandley Page (UK)Handley Page CompanyHandley Page slatsHandley Page went into liquidationHandley-Page
Handley Page Limited was founded by Frederick Handley Page (later Sir Frederick) in 1909 as the United Kingdom's first publicly traded aircraft manufacturing company.wikipedia
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Frederick Handley Page

Sir Frederick Handley PageF. H. PageFrederick H. Page
Handley Page Limited was founded by Frederick Handley Page (later Sir Frederick) in 1909 as the United Kingdom's first publicly traded aircraft manufacturing company.
His company Handley Page Limited was best known for its large aircraft such as the Handley Page 0/400 and Halifax bombers and the H.P.42 airliner.

Airliner

airlinerspassenger aircraftcommercial aircraft
The company, based at Radlett Aerodrome in Hertfordshire, was noted for its pioneering role in aviation history and for producing heavy bombers and large airliners.
The Handley Page company in Britain produced the Handley Page Type W as the company's first civil transport aircraft.

Radlett

Radlett AerodromeRadlett, Hertfordshire
The company, based at Radlett Aerodrome in Hertfordshire, was noted for its pioneering role in aviation history and for producing heavy bombers and large airliners.
Handley Page Ltd opened a grass airfield just north of the town in 1929 for the production of aircraft.

Handley Page V/1500

V/1500Handley Page V/1500 ''Atlantic
These aircraft included the O/100 of 1915, the O/400 of 1918 and the four-engined V/1500 with the range to reach Berlin.
The Handley Page V/1500 was a British night-flying heavy bomber built by Handley Page towards the end of the First World War.

Cricklewood

Brent
In 1912, Handley Page established an aircraft factory at Cricklewood after moving from Barking.
The Handley Page Aircraft Company soon followed, from 1912 until 1917, at 110 Cricklewood Lane and subsequently occupying a large part of Claremont Road.

Transatlantic flight

transatlantictrans-Atlantictrans-Atlantic flight
In early 1919, a Handley Page V/1500 aircraft, dubbed Atlantic, was shipped to Newfoundland to attempt the world's first non-stop Transatlantic flight; only to lose in the attempt to a Vickers Vimy piloted by Alcock and Brown in June of that year.
They were Australian pilot Harry Hawker with observer Kenneth Mackenzie-Grieve in a single engine Sopwith Atlantic; Frederick Raynham and C. W. F. Morgan in a Martinsyde; the Handley Page Group, led by Mark Kerr; and the Vickers entry John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown.

Transatlantic flight of Alcock and Brown

Alcock and BrownJohn Alcock and Arthur Brownfirst non-stop aerial crossing of the Atlantic
In early 1919, a Handley Page V/1500 aircraft, dubbed Atlantic, was shipped to Newfoundland to attempt the world's first non-stop Transatlantic flight; only to lose in the attempt to a Vickers Vimy piloted by Alcock and Brown in June of that year.
He became a military pilot during the First World War and was taken prisoner in Turkey after the engines on his Handley Page bomber failed over the Gulf of Xeros.

Vickers Vimy

VimyVickers Vimy CommercialVickers Vimy prototype
In early 1919, a Handley Page V/1500 aircraft, dubbed Atlantic, was shipped to Newfoundland to attempt the world's first non-stop Transatlantic flight; only to lose in the attempt to a Vickers Vimy piloted by Alcock and Brown in June of that year.
A week later, following the protests of the Controller of the Technical Department, the Air Board placed an order for 100 Handley Page O/100 bombers, which was accompanied by orders for prototype heavy bombers being placed with both Handley Page and Vickers Limited.

Gustav Lachmann

G.V. Lachmann
The leading edge slat was simultaneously designed by the German aerodynamicist Gustav Lachmann, who was later employed by Handley Page.
Gustav Victor Lachmann (3 February 1896 – 30 May 1966) was a German aeronautical engineer who spent most of his professional life working for the British aircraft company Handley Page.

Handley Page Victor

VictorHandley Page Victor K.2Victor K.2
The three types produced were known as the V-Bombers, and Handley Page's contribution was the HP.80 Victor, a four-engined, crescent-winged design.
The Handley Page Victor is a British jet-powered strategic bomber, developed and produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company, which served during the Cold War.

Handley Page Transport

CricklewoodCricklewood AerodromeHandley Page Transport Co Ltd.
Aircraft were built there, and flown from the company's adjacent airfield known as Cricklewood Aerodrome, which was later used by Handley Page Transport.
Cricklewood Aerodrome was adjacent to the Handley Page factory in Cricklewood, which had been established in 1912.

Avro Manchester

ManchesterManchestersMancheste
In response to a 1936 government request for heavier, longer ranged aircraft, Handley Page tendered the HP.56 design powered by twin Rolls-Royce Vulture s and this was ordered, along with what became the Avro Manchester.
This was the same specification to which Handley Page had also produced their initial design for what would become the Halifax bomber.

Avro Lancaster

LancasterLancastersLancaster bomber
The Halifax became the second most prolific British heavy bomber of the war after the Avro Lancaster (itself essentially a four-engine development of the Manchester).
Further requirements of the specification included the use of a mid-mounted cantilever monoplane wing, all-metal construction; the adoption of the in-development Rolls-Royce Vulture engine was also encouraged". Various candidates were submitted for the specification by such manufacturers as Fairey, Boulton Paul, Handley Page and Shorts; all submissions were designed around two-engine configurations, using the Rolls-Royce Vulture, Napier Sabre, Fairey P.24 or Bristol Hercules engines. The majority of these engines were under development at this point; while four-engined bomber designs were considered for specification B.12/36 for a heavy bomber, wings which mounted two pairs of engines were still in the experimental stage and required testing at the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), the resulting increase in overall weight of adopting a stronger wing also necessitated further strengthening of the overall aircraft structure.

Handley Page Halifax

HalifaxHalifaxesHalifax bomber
Therefore, before reaching prototype stage, the HP.56 design was reworked into the four-engined HP.57 Halifax.
It was developed by Handley Page to the same specification as the contemporary Avro Lancaster and Short Stirling, all three aircraft being four-engined heavy bombers.

Miles Aircraft

Miles Aircraft LimitedMilesPhillips & Powis
In 1947 Handley Page bought some of the assets of the bankrupt Miles Aircraft company.
The aviation assets were purchased by Handley Page as Handley Page Reading Ltd. Handley Page produced the Miles-designed M.60 Marathon as the H.P.R.1 Marathon.

V bomber

V-bomberV-ForceV Force
The three types produced were known as the V-Bombers, and Handley Page's contribution was the HP.80 Victor, a four-engined, crescent-winged design.
A request for designs went to most of the United Kingdom's major aircraft manufacturers: Handley Page, Armstrong Whitworth, Avro, Bristol, Short Brothers and English Electric.

Handley Page Jetstream

BAe Jetstream 31BAe Jetstream 32Jetstream
Unable to compete for government orders or with large commercial aircraft, Handley Page produced its final notable Handley Page design, the Jetstream.
Handley Page was in an awkward position in the 1960s, wishing to remain independent of the "big two" British companies (Hawker Siddeley and the British Aircraft Corporation), but without the money needed to develop a large new airliner that would keep it in the market.

Handley Page Type W

Handley Page W.10W.8Handley Page Hampstead
The V/1500 was considered too large to be practical at the time, but a number of design features of the V/1500 were later incorporated into an O/400 airframe to produce their first dedicated passenger design, the W.8.
The Handley Page W.8, W.9 and W.10 were British two- and three-engine medium-range biplane airliners designed and built by Handley Page.

Leading-edge slat

slatsleading edge slatsleading edge slat
Handley Page developed the Handley Page Slat (or slot, see slats), an auxiliary airfoil mounted ahead and over the main wing, which formed a narrow opening running along the leading edge of the wing to improve airflow at high angles of attack.
Independently of Lachmann, Handley Page Ltd in Great Britain also developed the slotted wing as a way to postpone the stall by delaying separation of the flow from the upper surface of the wing at high angles of attack, and applied for a patent in 1919; to avoid a patent challenge, they reached an ownership agreement with Lachmann.

Radlett Aerodrome

RadlettRAF Radlett
Radlett Aerodrome was opened in 1929 as a grass aerodrome for Handley Page Civil Aircraft.
Radlett Aerodrome was an airfield and aircraft manufacturing plant in Hertfordshire owned by Handley Page, where the company was headquartered.

Handley Page Type L

Handley Page L/200Type L / HP.8
Type L / HP.8 – biplane – never flew
The Handley Page L/200 was the internal designation for a biplane aircraft by Handley Page, conceived to compete for the Daily Mail £10,000 prize for the first nonstop air crossing of the Atlantic.

Hangar

aircraft hangarhangar deckhangars
Most of the towers, hangars and runways were demolished in the 1970s after the Company was terminated.
During World War I, other standard designs included the RFC General Service Flight Shed and the Admiralty F-Type of 1916, the General Service Shed (featuring the characteristic Belfast-truss roof and built in various sizes) and the Handley Page aeroplane shed (1918).

Handley Page Hyderabad

HP.24 HyderabadHyderabads
HP.24 Hyderabad
The Handley Page H.P.24 Hyderabad was a British twin-engine biplane heavy bomber built by Handley Page which served with the Royal Air Force between 1925 and 1933.

Handley Page Hinaidi

Handley Page CliveHandley Page Hinaidi prototypeHinaidi
HP.33 / HP.35 / HP.36 Hinaidi – heavy bomber
The Handley Page Hinaidi was one of two twin-engine bombers built by Handley Page that served with the Royal Air Force between 1925 and 1935.

Handley Page H.P.42

G-AAUC ''HorsaH.P. 42EH.P.42
Handley Page developed several large biplane airliners, including the luxurious Handley Page H.P.42, for use on Imperial routes to Africa and India.
The Handley Page H.P.42 and H.P.45 were British four-engine biplane airliners designed to a 1928 Imperial Airways specification by Handley Page of Radlett in Hertfordshire.