Hannah Arendt

ArendtArendt, HannahH ArendtArendt StudiesHannah Arendt Institute for Research into TotalitarianismHannah Arendt’sHannah-ArendtJohanna "Hannah" Arendt
Johanna "Hannah" Cohn Arendt (, also, ; 14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975), also known as Hannah Arendt Bluecher, was a German-American philosopher and political theorist.wikipedia
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The Origins of Totalitarianism

the classic study on totalitarianismOrigins of TotalitarianismThe Origins of Totalitarianism'', 1976
With the publication of The Origins of Totalitarianism in 1951, her reputation as a thinker and writer was established and a series of seminal works followed.
The Origins of Totalitarianism, published in 1951, was Hannah Arendt's first major work, wherein she describes and analyzes Nazism and Stalinism, the major totalitarian political movements of the first half of the 20th century.

Königsberg

Königsberg in PrussiaKönigsberg, PrussiaKöningsberg
Arendt was born in Hanover, Germany but mostly raised in Königsberg in a secular merchant Jewish culture by parents who were politically progressive, being supporters of the Social Democrats.
A university city, home of the Albertina University (founded in 1544), Königsberg developed into an important German intellectual and cultural centre, being the residence of Simon Dach, Immanuel Kant, Käthe Kollwitz, E. T. A. Hoffmann, David Hilbert, Agnes Miegel, Hannah Arendt, Michael Wieck and others.

On Revolution

These included The Human Condition in 1958, as well as Eichmann in Jerusalem and On Revolution in 1963.
On Revolution is a 1963 book by political theorist Hannah Arendt.

The Life of the Mind

She died suddenly of a heart attack in 1975, at the age of 69, leaving her last work, The Life of the Mind, unfinished.
The Life of the Mind was the final work of Hannah Arendt (1906–1975), and was unfinished at the time of her death.

Heinrich Blücher

Divorcing Stern in 1937, she married Heinrich Blücher in 1940, but when Germany invaded France in 1940 she was detained by the French as an alien, despite having been stripped of her German citizenship in 1937.
He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt who he had first met in Paris in 1936.

Martin Heidegger

HeideggerHeideggerianHeidegger, Martin
After completing her secondary education, she studied at the University of Marburg under Martin Heidegger, with whom she had a brief affair, and who had a lasting influence on her thinking.
Heidegger's students at Marburg included Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith, Gerhard Krüger, Leo Strauss, Jacob Klein, Günther Anders, and Hans Jonas.

Rahel Varnhagen

Rahel LevinRahel Varnhagen von EnseRahel
She came to greatly identify with Rahel Varnhagen (1771–1833), the Prussian socialite who desperately wanted to assimilate into German culture, only to be rejected because she was born Jewish.
She is the subject of a celebrated biography, Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess (1957), written by Hannah Arendt.

University of Freiburg

FreiburgFreiburg UniversityAlbert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Heidegger was continuing an intellectual movement started by Edmund Husserl, whose assistant he had been at Freiburg before coming to Marburg.
The University of Freiburg has been associated with figures such as Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, Rudolf Carnap, David Daube, Johann Eck, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Friedrich Hayek, Edmund Husserl, Friedrich Meinecke, Max Weber, Paul Uhlenhuth and Ernst Zermelo.

Authority

authority figureauthoritiesauthoritative
Her works cover a broad range of topics, but she is best known for those dealing with the nature of power and evil, as well as politics, direct democracy, authority, and totalitarianism.
Among others, Hannah Arendt, Carl Joachim Friedrich, Thomas Hobbes, Alexandre Kojève and Carl Schmitt have provided some of the most remarkable texts.

Elisabeth Young-Bruehl

Young-Bruehl, Elisabeth
The relationship was not known until Elisabeth Young-Bruehl's biography of Arendt appeared in 1982, by which time Arendt and Heidegger had both died, though Heidegger's wife, Elfride (1893–1992), was still alive.
She published a wide range of books, most notably biographies of Hannah Arendt and Anna Freud.

Political philosophy

political theorypolitical philosopherpolitical theorist
Johanna "Hannah" Cohn Arendt (, also, ; 14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975), also known as Hannah Arendt Bluecher, was a German-American philosopher and political theorist.
A number of continental European émigrés to Britain and the United States—including Karl Popper, Friedrich Hayek, Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Eric Voegelin and Judith Shklar—encouraged continued study in political philosophy in the Anglo-American world, but in the 1950s and 1960s they and their students remained at odds with the analytic establishment.

Hans Jonas

Has Jonas
Among her friends there was Hans Jonas, her only Jewish classmate.
In Marburg he met Hannah Arendt, who was also pursuing her PhD there, and the two of them were to remain friends for the rest of their lives.

Walter Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamin, WalterW. Benjamin
In Paris, she befriended Stern's cousin, the Marxist literary critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) and also the Jewish philosopher Raymond Aron (1905–1983).
He was also related by law to German political theorist and philosopher Hannah Arendt through her first marriage to Benjamin's cousin, Günther Anders.

Hanover

HannoverHanover, GermanyHannover, Germany
Arendt was born in Hanover, Germany but mostly raised in Königsberg in a secular merchant Jewish culture by parents who were politically progressive, being supporters of the Social Democrats.

Günther Anders

Gunther AndersAndersGunther Siegmund Stern
Hannah Arendt married Günther Stern in 1929, but soon began to encounter increasing antisemitism in 1930s Nazi Germany.
Anders was married three times, to the German philosopher and political scientist Hannah Arendt from 1929 to 1937, to the Austrian writer Elisabeth Freundlich from 1945 to 1955, and to American pianist Charlotte Lois Zelka in 1957.

Naturalization

naturalizednaturalized citizennaturalised
In 1950, Arendt also became a naturalized citizen of the United States.
As Hannah Arendt pointed out, internment camps became the "only nation" of such stateless people, since they were often considered "undesirable" and were stuck in an illegal situation, wherein their country had expelled them or deprived them of their nationality, while they had not been naturalized, thus living in a judicial no man's land.

The Human Condition

political philosophyThe Human Condition (book)vita activa
These included The Human Condition in 1958, as well as Eichmann in Jerusalem and On Revolution in 1963.
The Human Condition, first published in 1958, Hannah Arendt's account of how "human activities" should be and have been understood throughout Western history.

Heidelberg University

University of HeidelbergHeidelbergRuprecht Karl University of Heidelberg
She obtained her doctorate in philosophy in 1929 at the University of Heidelberg with Karl Jaspers.
Amongst Heidelberg alumni in other disciplines are the "Father of Psychology" Wilhelm Wundt, the "Father of Physical Chemistry" J. Willard Gibbs, the "Father of American Anthropology" Franz Boas, Dmitri Mendeleev, who created the periodic table of elements, inventor of the two-wheeler principle Karl Drais, Alfred Wegener, who discovered the continental drift, as well as political theorist Hannah Arendt, gender theorist Judith Butler, political scientist Carl Joachim Friedrich, and sociologists Karl Mannheim, Robert E. Park and Talcott Parsons.

Rudolf Bultmann

BultmannRudolph BultmannBultmann, Rudolf
At Marburg (1924–1926) she studied classical languages, German literature, Protestant theology with Rudolf Bultmann and philosophy with Nicolai Hartmann and Heidegger.
He also taught Hannah Arendt.

Structured Liberal Education (Stanford University)

Structured Liberal Education
In 1974, Arendt was instrumental in the creation of Structured Liberal Education (SLE) at Stanford University.
Structured Liberal Education was the brainchild of Stanford history professor Mark Mancall, with political theorist Hannah Arendt as one of the original proponents of the program's enactment.

Karl Jaspers

JaspersJaspers, KarlJaspersian
She obtained her doctorate in philosophy in 1929 at the University of Heidelberg with Karl Jaspers.

Romano Guardini

Guardini(Romano) Guardini
In Berlin she lived in a student residence and audited courses of her choosing at the University of Berlin (1922–1923), including classics and Christian theology under Romano Guardini.
Hannah Arendt and Iring Fetscher were favourably impressed by Guardini's work.

Kurt Blumenfeld

Like other members of the Centralverein he primarily saw himself as a German and disapproved of the activities of Zionists, such as the young Kurt Blumenfeld (1884–1963), who was a frequent visitor to their home and would later become one of Hannah's mentors.
He was a good friend of Hannah Arendt.

The New York Review of Books

New York Review of BooksNew York ReviewNYRB
She also contributed to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, Commonweal, Dissent and The New Yorker.
Early issues included articles by such writers as Hardwick, Lowell, Jason Epstein, Hannah Arendt, W. H. Auden, Saul Bellow, John Berryman, Truman Capote, Paul Goodman, Lillian Hellman, Irving Howe, Alfred Kazin, Dwight Macdonald, Norman Mailer, Mary McCarthy, Norman Podhoretz, Philip Rahv, Adrienne Rich, Susan Sontag, William Styron, Gore Vidal, Robert Penn Warren and Edmund Wilson.

Commonweal (magazine)

CommonwealCommonweal MagazineCommonweal Foundation
She also contributed to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, Commonweal, Dissent and The New Yorker.
Commonweal has published the writing of François Mauriac, Georges Bernanos, Hannah Arendt, G. K. Chesterton, Hilaire Belloc, Jacques Maritain, Dorothy Day, Robert Bellah, Graham Greene, Emmanuel Mounier, Conor Cruise O'Brien, Thomas Merton, Wilfrid Sheed, Paul Ramsey, Joseph Bernardin, Abigail McCarthy, Christopher Lasch, Walter Kerr, Marilynne Robinson, Luke Timothy Johnson, Terry Eagleton, Elizabeth Johnson, and Andrew Bacevich.