Hannah Greg

Hannah LightbodyHannah (née Lightbody)
Hannah Greg (née Lightbody) (1766 – 1834) was an English woman significant in the early Industrial Revolution.wikipedia
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Samuel Greg

While her husband Samuel Greg pioneered new ways of running a cloth mill, she supervised the housing and conditions of the employees, including the education of the child workers.
He and his wife Hannah Greg took their responsibilities to their employees seriously, building a model village alongside the factory.

Quarry Bank Mill

'''Quarry Bank Mill''' GregQuarry Bank Mill and Styal Estate
The Gregs were considered enlightened employers for the time, and though in the 1830s the apprentice system was questioned, Quarry Bank Mill maintained it until her death.
The mill was notable for the innovative approach to labour relations, largely as a result of the work of Greg's wife, Hannah Lightbody.

Robert Hyde Greg

Robert GregRobert Hyde
Four of their sons, Robert Hyde (1795–1875), John (1801-1882), Samuel Jr. (1804–1876) and William Rathbone (1809–1881), entered the business.
Born in Manchester, he was the son of Samuel Greg and Hannah Lightbody, the creators of Quarry Bank Mill, a pioneering factory of the early Industrial Revolution.

William Rathbone Greg

W. R. GregWilliam GregWilliam Rathbone
Four of their sons, Robert Hyde (1795–1875), John (1801-1882), Samuel Jr. (1804–1876) and William Rathbone (1809–1881), entered the business.
Born in Manchester, the son of Samuel Greg, the creator of Quarry Bank Mill, and Hannah Greg, he was brother to Robert Hyde Greg and the junior Samuel Greg.

Adam Hodgson

Hannah's sister Elizabeth married Thomas Hodgson, who took part in the Atlantic slave trade; their son Adam Hodgson was a founding member of the Liverpool Anti-slavery Society in 1822.
His aunt Hannah Lightbody married Samuel Greg; the couple established Quarry Bank Mill, a centre of innovation in the cloth business.

William Rathbone V

William Rathbone
Elizabeth Greg (1790–1882) married William Rathbone V, of the Liverpool mercantile family.
Rathbone married Elizabeth (1790–1882), daughter of Samuel Greg of Quarry Bank Mill, Cheshire and Hannah (née Lightbody) in 1812.

Industrial Revolution

industrialindustrialismindustrial era
Hannah Greg (née Lightbody) (1766 – 1834) was an English woman significant in the early Industrial Revolution.

Liverpool

Liverpool, EnglandLiverpudlianCity of Liverpool
Hannah Lightbody was the daughter of a wealthy Unitarian Liverpool merchant, Adam Lightbody (1729–1778), and Elizabeth Tylston (1735–1801), who came from a prominent dissenting family.

Philip Henry

Philip Henry (clergyman)
Elizabeth's grandfather was John Tylston, the "good doctor of Chester", who married a daughter of Philip Henry, the ejected preacher, and thus Elizabeth had moved easily within the London and Warrington dissenting circles.

Great Ejection

ejected ministerejectedejected ministers
Elizabeth's grandfather was John Tylston, the "good doctor of Chester", who married a daughter of Philip Henry, the ejected preacher, and thus Elizabeth had moved easily within the London and Warrington dissenting circles.

Warrington Academy

Academyacademy at Warringtonone in Warrington
Elizabeth's grandfather was John Tylston, the "good doctor of Chester", who married a daughter of Philip Henry, the ejected preacher, and thus Elizabeth had moved easily within the London and Warrington dissenting circles.

The Lyceum, Liverpool

LyceumThe Lyceumlending library
She was a member of the Liverpool Library, England's first subscription library, and the Octonian Society.

Subscription library

subscription librariesproprietary librarysocial library
She was a member of the Liverpool Library, England's first subscription library, and the Octonian Society.

Henry Solly

Henry
(The name was explained by Henry Solly as being a discussion group limited to eight members.

Ormskirk

Ormskirk, LancashireOrmskirk RoadOrmskirk with an Honours Degree.
She was eleven, studying in Henry Holland's School in nearby Ormskirk, when her father died, leaving her one-third of his wealth, held in trust until she was 21.

Newington Green

MildmayMildmay Hospitalof that name
When she was sixteen, her cousin Thomas Rogers invited her to his home in Newington Green, then a village a couple of miles north of the City of London.

City of London

CityLondonthe City
When she was sixteen, her cousin Thomas Rogers invited her to his home in Newington Green, then a village a couple of miles north of the City of London.

Samuel Rogers

Rogers
He had children of a similar age (including Samuel Rogers, later an eminent man of letters), so she could attend Fleetwood House school in Stoke Newington a mile further north, and worship with the family at the Unitarian Church on the Green.

Intellectual

man of letterspublic intellectualintellectuals
He had children of a similar age (including Samuel Rogers, later an eminent man of letters), so she could attend Fleetwood House school in Stoke Newington a mile further north, and worship with the family at the Unitarian Church on the Green.

Abney Park

Abney HouseFleetwood HouseFleetwood's house
He had children of a similar age (including Samuel Rogers, later an eminent man of letters), so she could attend Fleetwood House school in Stoke Newington a mile further north, and worship with the family at the Unitarian Church on the Green.

Stoke Newington

Simon Marks Jewish Primary SchoolStoke Newington, LondonNewington, Stoke
He had children of a similar age (including Samuel Rogers, later an eminent man of letters), so she could attend Fleetwood House school in Stoke Newington a mile further north, and worship with the family at the Unitarian Church on the Green.

Newington Green Unitarian Church

Newington Green Chapelcurrent Unitarian churchhis own church in Newington Green
He had children of a similar age (including Samuel Rogers, later an eminent man of letters), so she could attend Fleetwood House school in Stoke Newington a mile further north, and worship with the family at the Unitarian Church on the Green.

English Dissenters

DissentersDissentingDissenter
Thomas Rogers was prominent among the London rational dissenters, and the two neighbouring villages were filled with Quakers and non-conformists, including those who started the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade.

Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade

Committee for the Abolition of the Slave TradeSociety for the Abolition of the Slave Tradeanti-slavery campaigner
Thomas Rogers was prominent among the London rational dissenters, and the two neighbouring villages were filled with Quakers and non-conformists, including those who started the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade.

Richard Price

Dr PriceDr. PricePrice
The Rogers family lived next door to Richard Price, the well-connected minister, where Mary Wollstonecraft was a visitor.