Hannah More

Hannah More (2 February 1745 – 7 September 1833) was an English religious writer and philanthropist, remembered as a poet and playwright in the circle of Johnson, Reynolds and Garrick, as a writer on moral and religious subjects, and as a practical philanthropist.wikipedia
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Cheap Repository Tracts

Cheap Repository Tract
In the 1790s she wrote several Cheap Repository Tracts on moral, religious and political topics, for distribution to the literate poor.
They were devised by Hannah More and intended for sale or distribution to literate poor people, as an alternative to what she regarded as the immoral traditional broadside ballad and chapbook publications.

William Wilberforce

WilberforceWilliam(William) Wilberforce
Meanwhile, she did increasing philanthropic work in the Mendip area, encouraged by William Wilberforce. By this point she was intimate with William Wilberforce and Zachary Macaulay, with whose evangelical views she was in sympathy.
In 1787, he came into contact with Thomas Clarkson and a group of anti-slave-trade activists, including Granville Sharp, Hannah More and Charles Middleton.

Mendip Hills

MendipsMendipMendip Hills AONB
Meanwhile, she did increasing philanthropic work in the Mendip area, encouraged by William Wilberforce. In the late 1780s, Hannah and Martha More did philanthropic work in the Mendip area, following encouragement by Wilberforce, who saw the poor conditions of the local people when he visited Cheddar in 1789.
The difficult conditions in the area were noted by William Wilberforce in 1789, which inspired Hannah More to begin her work improving the conditions of the Mendip miners and agricultural workers.

Bluestocking

Bluestockingsblue-stockingbas-bleu
She became involved with the London literary elite as a leading Bluestocking member. She also became one of the prominent members of the Bluestocking group of women engaged in polite conversation and literary and intellectual pursuits, attending the salon of Elizabeth Montagu, where she also met and became acquainted with Frances Boscawen, Elizabeth Carter, Elizabeth Vesey and Hester Chapone, some of whom were to become lifelong friends.
In the following generation came Hester Lynch Piozzi (1741–1821), Hannah More (1745–1833) and Frances Burney (1752–1840).

Elizabeth Carter

She also became one of the prominent members of the Bluestocking group of women engaged in polite conversation and literary and intellectual pursuits, attending the salon of Elizabeth Montagu, where she also met and became acquainted with Frances Boscawen, Elizabeth Carter, Elizabeth Vesey and Hester Chapone, some of whom were to become lifelong friends.
Carter had many eminent friends and was close to Elizabeth Montagu, Hannah More, Hester Chapone, and other Bluestocking members.

Ann Yearsley

Anne Yearsley
At Bristol she discovered the poet Ann Yearsley and, when Yearsley became destitute, raised a considerable sum of money for her benefit.
A decade later the family were rescued from destitution by the charity of Hannah More and others.

Abolitionism in the United Kingdom

abolitionistabolition of slaveryabolition
She published a poem on Slavery in 1788, and was for many years a friend of Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London and a leading abolitionist, who drew her into the group of prominent campaigners against the slave trade such as Wilberforce, Charles Middleton and James Ramsay, based at Teston, Kent.
James Edward Oglethorpe was among the first to articulate the Enlightenment case against slavery, banning slavery in the Province of Georgia on humanistic grounds, arguing against it in Parliament and eventually encouraging his friends Granville Sharp and Hannah More vigorously to pursue the cause.

Elizabeth Montagu

Mrs. MontaguMrs. Elizabeth MontaguElizabeth Robinson
She also became one of the prominent members of the Bluestocking group of women engaged in polite conversation and literary and intellectual pursuits, attending the salon of Elizabeth Montagu, where she also met and became acquainted with Frances Boscawen, Elizabeth Carter, Elizabeth Vesey and Hester Chapone, some of whom were to become lifelong friends.
For writers, being introduced there meant patronage, and Montagu patronized a number of authors, including Elizabeth Carter, Hannah More, Frances Burney, Anna Barbauld, Sarah Fielding, Hester Chapone, James Beattie, James Woodhouse and Anna Williams.

Elizabeth Vesey

She also became one of the prominent members of the Bluestocking group of women engaged in polite conversation and literary and intellectual pursuits, attending the salon of Elizabeth Montagu, where she also met and became acquainted with Frances Boscawen, Elizabeth Carter, Elizabeth Vesey and Hester Chapone, some of whom were to become lifelong friends.
Vesey's well-known friends included Mary Delany, whom she met in Ireland, Margaret, Duchess of Portland, Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Carter, Frances Burney, and Hannah More.

Coelebs in Search of a Wife

In 1785 More bought a house at Cowslip Green, near Wrington in northern Somerset, where she settled down to country life with her sister Martha, and wrote many ethical books and tracts: Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (1799), Hints towards Forming the Character of a Young Princess (1805), Coelebs in Search of a Wife (only nominally a story, 1809), Practical Piety (1811), Christian Morals (1813), Character of St Paul (1815), Moral Sketches (1819).
Coelebs in Search of a Wife (1809) is a novel by the British Christian moralist Hannah More.

Zachary Macaulay

Macaulay and BabingtonMacaulay the elderMacaulays
By this point she was intimate with William Wilberforce and Zachary Macaulay, with whose evangelical views she was in sympathy.

Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

Perhaps the most famous of these is The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain, describing a family of phenomenal frugality and contentment.
Shepherd of Salisbury Plain (1795) is the name of the hero, a shepherd of the name of Saunders, in a tract written by Hannah More, characterised by homely wisdom and simple piety.

Wrington

Butcombe Brewery
In 1785 More bought a house at Cowslip Green, near Wrington in northern Somerset, where she settled down to country life with her sister Martha, and wrote many ethical books and tracts: Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (1799), Hints towards Forming the Character of a Young Princess (1805), Coelebs in Search of a Wife (only nominally a story, 1809), Practical Piety (1811), Christian Morals (1813), Character of St Paul (1815), Moral Sketches (1819).
The church includes on either side of the door stone busts to John Locke and Hannah More dating from the early 19th century.

Cheddar, Somerset

CheddarCheddar ValleyNyland
In the late 1780s, Hannah and Martha More did philanthropic work in the Mendip area, following encouragement by Wilberforce, who saw the poor conditions of the local people when he visited Cheddar in 1789.
He inspired Hannah More in her work to improve the conditions of the Mendip miners and agricultural workers.

Beilby Porteus

Bishop Beilby PorteusBishop PorteusBishop of London
She published a poem on Slavery in 1788, and was for many years a friend of Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London and a leading abolitionist, who drew her into the group of prominent campaigners against the slave trade such as Wilberforce, Charles Middleton and James Ramsay, based at Teston, Kent.
He enlisted the support of his friend Hannah More, former dramatist and bluestocking, to write tracts against the wickedness of the immorality and licentious behaviour which were common at these events.

Wedmore

BagleyThealeIsle of Wedmore
The school at Wedmore received strong opposition from the locals, who petitioned the Dean of Wells to remove her.
In 1799 Hannah More established a Sunday school for children in Wedmore in the face of opposition from the vicar and local gentry.

Frances Boscawen

FrancesFrances Evelyn Glanville
Frances Boscawen considered it better than William Paley's pamphlet The British Public's Reasons for Contentment and Richard Owen Cambridge claimed "Swift could not have done it better."
Her guests included Elizabeth Montagu, Dr Johnson, James Boswell, Joshua Reynolds, Frances Reynolds, Elizabeth Carter, and later Hannah More, who described her as "sage" in her 1782 poem The Bas Bleu, or, Conversation, published in 1784.

Kenyon College

KenyonGotta Get Down to ItLadies
More also donated money to Bishop Philander Chase for the founding of Kenyon College, and a portrait of her hangs there in Peirce Hall.
Undeterred, he sailed to England and solicited donations from Lord Kenyon, Lord Gambier, and the writer and philanthropist Hannah More, and the College was incorporated in December, 1824.

Charles Middleton, 1st Baron Barham

Charles MiddletonLord BarhamSir Charles Middleton
She published a poem on Slavery in 1788, and was for many years a friend of Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London and a leading abolitionist, who drew her into the group of prominent campaigners against the slave trade such as Wilberforce, Charles Middleton and James Ramsay, based at Teston, Kent.
In 1787 Wilberforce was introduced to James Ramsay and Thomas Clarkson at Teston, as well as meeting the growing group of supporters of abolition, which also included Edward Eliot, Hannah More, the evangelical writer and philanthropist and Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London.

John Scandrett Harford

HarfordMr. Harford
John Scandrett Harford of Blaise Castle was a prodigious benefactor to More's schools in the 1790s, and More modelled the idealised hero and heroine in Coelebs in Search of Wife (1809) on Mr and Mrs Harford.
John Harford the Elder patronised Hannah More's schools in Somerset in the 1790s.

William Roberts (biographer)

William RobertsRoberts, William
William Roberts (1767 in Newington Butts – 21 May 1849) was an English barrister and legal writer, an evangelical journal editor and the first biographer of Hannah More.

Church of All Saints, Wrington

Church of All SaintsAll SaintsAll Saints' Church, Wrington
She is buried at Church of All Saints, Wrington; busts of her and John Locke remain in the south porch.
The interior includes stone busts to John Locke and Hannah More dating from the early 19th century on either side of the door.

Reisterstown, Maryland

ReisterstownGlyndonReistertown, Maryland
Several local schools and the Hannah More Academy at Reisterstown, Maryland are named in her honour.

Charlotte Mary Yonge

Charlotte YongeCharlotte M. YongeYonge, Charlotte
She also wrote Cameos from English History, Life of John Coleridge Patteson: Missionary Bishop of the Melanesian Islands, and Hannah More.

St. Michael's Church (Reisterstown, Maryland)

Hannah More AcademySt. Michael's Church
Several local schools and the Hannah More Academy at Reisterstown, Maryland are named in her honour.
It was named after Hannah More.