Hard science fiction

hard SFhard science-fictionhard sci-fihard-SFhardhard" science fictionhard sciencescience fictionscientifically accuratehard scientific
Hard science fiction is a category of science fiction characterized by concern for scientific accuracy and logic.wikipedia
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Soft science fiction

softscience fictionsoft SF
The complementary term soft science fiction, formed by analogy to hard science fiction, first appeared in the late 1970s.
The term soft science fiction was formed as the complement of the earlier term hard science fiction.

Golden Age of Science Fiction

Golden AgeGolden Age SFbegan to age in the 1950s
The Golden Age of Science Fiction is generally considered to have started in the late 1930s and lasted until the mid-1940s, bringing with it "a quantum jump in quality, perhaps the greatest in the history of the genre", according to science fiction historians Peter Nicholls and Mike Ashley.
According to historian Adam Roberts, "the phrase Golden Age valorises a particular sort of writing: 'Hard SF', linear narratives, heroes solving problems or countering threats in a space-opera or technological-adventure idiom."

A Fall of Moondust

Later discoveries do not necessarily invalidate the label of hard SF, as evidenced by P. Schuyler Miller, who called Arthur C. Clarke's 1961 novel A Fall of Moondust hard SF, and the designation remains valid even though a crucial plot element, the existence of deep pockets of "moondust" in lunar craters, is now known to be incorrect.
A Fall of Moondust is a hard science fiction novel by British writer Arthur C. Clarke, first published in 1961.

Hal Clement

ClementHarry StubbsClement, Hal
For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years.
Harry Clement Stubbs (May 30, 1922 – October 29, 2003), better known by the pen name Hal Clement, was an American science fiction writer and a leader of the hard science fiction subgenre.

Larry Niven

Niven Larry NivenBecalmed in Hell
For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years.
His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics.

Mesklin

For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years.
Mesklin is a fictional supergiant planet created by Hal Clement and used in a number of his hard science fiction stories.

Surface Tension (short story)

Surface Tension
"Surface Tension" is a science fiction short story by American writer James Blish, originally published in the August 1952 of Galaxy Science Fiction.

Tom Godwin

Thomas GodwinTom Godwin (writer)
His hard science fiction short story, "The Cold Equations," is a notable example of the mid-1950s science fiction genre.

Robert A. Heinlein

Robert HeinleinHeinleinRobert Anson Heinlein
Sometimes called the "dean of science fiction writers", he was among the first to emphasize scientific accuracy in his fiction, and was thus a pioneer of the subgenre of hard science fiction.

Geoffrey A. Landis

Geoffrey LandisLandisGeoff Landis
Supported by his scientific background Landis also writes hard science fiction.

A Walk in the Sun (short story)

A Walk in the SunA Walk in the Sun" (short story)
"A Walk in the Sun" is a hard science fiction short story published in 1991 by American writer Geoffrey A. Landis.

Greg Bear

Greag Bear
Bear is often classified as a hard science fiction author because of the level of scientific detail in his work.

Tau Zero

Tau Zero is a hard science fiction novel by American writer Poul Anderson.

The Outward Urge

Unlike most of Wyndham's novels, The Outward Urge was conventional hard science fiction and his publishers decided that they wanted to use the Wyndham and Parkes byline because it was "not your usual Wyndham style".

Dragon's Egg

Cheela
Dragon's Egg is a 1980 hard science fiction novel by Robert L. Forward.

Islands of Space

The term was first used in print in 1957 by P. Schuyler Miller in a review of John W. Campbell's Islands of Space in the November issue of Astounding Science Fiction.
This is the first published use of the term hard science fiction.

Murasaki (novel)

MurasakiMurasaki'' (novel)
Murasaki is a 1992 "shared universe" hard science fiction novel in six parts to which Poul Anderson, Greg Bear, Gregory Benford, David Brin, Nancy Kress and Frederik Pohl each contributed one chapter; it was edited by Robert Silverberg.

Stephen Baxter (author)

Stephen BaxterSteven BaxterBaxter, Stephen
Stephen Baxter (born 13 November 1957) is an English hard science fiction author.

Alastair Reynolds

Alistair ReynoldsRevelation SpaceReynolds
He specialises in hard science fiction and space opera.

Paul J. McAuley

Paul McAuleyWhite DevilsIn The Mouth of the Whale
A biologist by training, McAuley writes mostly hard science fiction.

Greg Egan

(Greg) EganEganOur Lady of Chernobyl
Greg Egan (born 20 August 1961) is an Australian science fiction writer and amateur mathematician, best known for his works of hard science fiction.

Seveneves

Seveneves is a hard science fiction novel by Neal Stephenson published in 2015.

Mission of Gravity

For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years.

2001: A Space Odyssey (film)

2001: A Space Odyssey2001film
The film is noted for its scientifically accurate depiction of space flight, pioneering special effects, and ambiguous imagery.