Harlan Ellison

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Harlan Jay Ellison (May 27, 1934 – June 28, 2018) was an American writer, known for his prolific and influential work in New Wave speculative fiction, and for his outspoken, combative personality.wikipedia
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Dangerous Visions

The RecognitionEncounter with a HickErsatz" (short story)
He was also editor and anthologist for Dangerous Visions (1967) and Again, Dangerous Visions (1972).
Dangerous Visions is a science fiction short story anthology edited by American writer Harlan Ellison and illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon.

I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream

I Have No Mouth and I Must ScreamAMeponymous short story
Some of his best-known work includes the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever", his A Boy and His Dog cycle, and his short stories "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" and " 'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman".
"I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" is a post-apocalyptic science fiction short story by American writer Harlan Ellison.

A Boy and His Dog

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Some of his best-known work includes the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever", his A Boy and His Dog cycle, and his short stories "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" and " 'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman". Another story, "A Boy and His Dog", examines the nature of friendship and love in a violent, post-apocalyptic world and was made into the 1975 film of the same name, starring Don Johnson.
A Boy and His Dog is a cycle of narratives by author Harlan Ellison.

Again, Dangerous Visions

He was also editor and anthologist for Dangerous Visions (1967) and Again, Dangerous Visions (1972).
Again, Dangerous Visions (1972) is a science fiction short story anthology, edited by Harlan Ellison.

Rogue (magazine)

RogueRogue'' magazineRogue Magazine Philippines
After leaving the army, he relocated to Chicago, where he edited Rogue magazine.
Founding editor Frank M. Robinson was followed by other editors, including Harlan Ellison and Bruce Elliott.

The Oscar (film)

The OscarOscarThe Oscar'' (film)
He co-wrote the screenplay for The Oscar (1966), starring Stephen Boyd and Elke Sommer.
The Oscar is a 1966 American drama film written by Harlan Ellison, Clarence Greene, Russell Rouse, and Richard Sale, directed by Rouse and starring Stephen Boyd, singer Tony Bennett (in his film debut), comedian Milton Berle (in a dramatic role), Elke Sommer, Ernest Borgnine, Jill St. John, Eleanor Parker, Joseph Cotten, Edie Adams, Peter Lawford, Broderick Crawford, Ed Begley, Walter Brennan, and Jack Soo.

Web of the City

His first novel, Web of the City, was published during his military service in 1958, and he said that he had written the bulk of it while undergoing basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia.
Web of the City (originally published as Rumble) is the first novel written by American author Harlan Ellison.

The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

The Man from U.N.C.L.EThe Man from UNCLEMan from U.N.C.L.E.
Ellison also sold scripts to many television shows: The Loretta Young Show (using the name Harlan Ellis),The Flying Nun, Burke's Law, Route 66, The Outer Limits, Star Trek, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Cimarron Strip, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.
The original name was Ian Fleming's Solo. Robert Towne, Sherman Yellen, and Harlan Ellison later wrote scripts for the series.

I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (video game)

I Have No Mouth, and I Must ScreamI Have No Mouth And I Must Screama computer game of the same name
The story was the basis of a 1995 computer game; Ellison participated in the game's design and provided the voice of the god-computer AM.
I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream is a 1995 point-and-click adventure game developed by Cyberdreams and The Dreamers Guild, co-designed by Harlan Ellison and published by Cyberdreams.

"Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman

'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman
Some of his best-known work includes the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever", his A Boy and His Dog cycle, and his short stories "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" and " 'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman".
"Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" is a science fiction short story by American writer Harlan Ellison published in 1965.

The Outer Limits (1963 TV series)

The Outer LimitsOuter LimitsAu-delà du réel
Ellison also sold scripts to many television shows: The Loretta Young Show (using the name Harlan Ellis),The Flying Nun, Burke's Law, Route 66, The Outer Limits, Star Trek, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Cimarron Strip, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.
Two especially notable Season 2 episodes "Demon with a Glass Hand" and "Soldier" were written by Harlan Ellison, with the former episode winning a Writers' Guild Award.

Speculative fiction

speculativeSf&fspeculative literature
Harlan Jay Ellison (May 27, 1934 – June 28, 2018) was an American writer, known for his prolific and influential work in New Wave speculative fiction, and for his outspoken, combative personality.
Harlan Ellison used the term to avoid being pigeonholed as a writer.

The Twilight Zone (1985 TV series)

The Twilight ZoneThe New Twilight ZoneTwilight Zone
Ellison served as creative consultant to the 1980s version of The Twilight Zone science fiction TV series and Babylon 5.
These sentiments were seconded by a number of young filmmakers eager to make their mark on a series which had proved influential to their life and work—people like writers Harlan Ellison, George R. R. Martin, Rockne S. O'Bannon, Jeremy Bertrand Finch, Paul Chitlik and directors Wes Craven and William Friedkin.

A Boy and His Dog (1975 film)

A Boy and His Dog1975 film1975 film of the same name
Another story, "A Boy and His Dog", examines the nature of friendship and love in a violent, post-apocalyptic world and was made into the 1975 film of the same name, starring Don Johnson.
The film's script is based on the 1969 cycle of narratives by fantasy author Harlan Ellison titled A Boy and His Dog.

Dreams with Sharp Teeth

In September 2007, Ellison made his last public appearance in his hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, for the Midwestern debut of the documentary Dreams with Sharp Teeth at the Cleveland Public Library.
Dreams with Sharp Teeth is a 2008 biographical documentary film about writer Harlan Ellison.

Robert Bloch

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Robert Bloch, the author of Psycho, described Ellison as "the only living organism I know whose natural habitat is hot water".
His contribution to Harlan Ellison's 1967 science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions was a story, "A Toy for Juliette", which evoked both Jack the Ripper and the Marquis de Sade in a time-travel story.

Mind Fields

In 2014 Ellison made a guest appearance on the album Finding Love in Hell by the stoner metal band Leaving Babylon, reading his piece "The Silence" (originally published in Mind Fields) as an introduction to the song "Dead to Me."
Mind Fields is a book featuring paintings by Polish painter Jacek Yerka combined with short stories and prose poems by American writer Harlan Ellison.

Babylon 5

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Ellison served as creative consultant to the 1980s version of The Twilight Zone science fiction TV series and Babylon 5.
Harlan Ellison, a creative consultant on the show, received story credits for two episodes.

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction

post-apocalypticapocalypticpost-apocalyptic fiction
Another story, "A Boy and His Dog", examines the nature of friendship and love in a violent, post-apocalyptic world and was made into the 1975 film of the same name, starring Don Johnson.
Harlan Ellison's novella "A Boy and His Dog" (1969) takes place in a world desolated by the nuclear warfare in World War IV.

Strange Wine

In his book Strange Wine, Ellison explains the origins of the Bird and goes on to state that Philip Jose Farmer wrote Cordwainer into the Wold Newton family that the latter writer had developed.
Strange Wine is a 1978 short story collection by American writer Harlan Ellison.

Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation

Best Dramatic PresentationBest Dramatic Presentation, Short FormHugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form
Both versions of the script won awards: Ellison's original script won the 1968 Writers Guild Award for best episodic drama in television, while the shooting script won the 1968 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Stephen King

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Stephen King once said he thought that it meant that Ellison was giving people who mangled his work a literary version of "the bird" (given credence by Ellison himself in his own essay titled "Somehow, I Don't Think We're in Kansas, Toto", describing his experience with the Starlost television series).
The book, whose profits were donated to assist with famine relief in Africa, was written by a number of different authors in the comic book field, such as Chris Claremont, Stan Lee, and Alan Moore, as well as authors not primarily associated with that industry, such as Harlan Ellison.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Star TrekThe Original SeriesOriginal Series
Some of his best-known work includes the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever", his A Boy and His Dog cycle, and his short stories "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" and " 'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman". Ellison also sold scripts to many television shows: The Loretta Young Show (using the name Harlan Ellis),The Flying Nun, Burke's Law, Route 66, The Outer Limits, Star Trek, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Cimarron Strip, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.
In its writing, Star Trek is notable as one of the earliest science-fiction TV series to use the services of leading contemporary science fiction writers, such as Robert Bloch, Norman Spinrad, Harlan Ellison, and Theodore Sturgeon, as well as established television writers.

The Last Dangerous Visions

Last Dangerous Visions
The Last Dangerous Visions (TLDV), the third volume of Ellison's anthology series, was originally announced for publication in 1973, but remains unpublished.
Like the first two, it was scheduled to be edited by Harlan Ellison, with introductions provided by Ellison.

AggieCon

In 1969, Ellison was Guest of Honor at Texas A&M University's first science fiction convention, Aggiecon, where he reportedly referred to the university's Corps of Cadets as "America's next generation of Nazis", inspired in part by the continuing Vietnam War.