Harold Godwinson

King HaroldHaroldHarold IIHarold II of EnglandKing Harold IIEarl HaroldHarold of EnglandKing Harold GodwinsonHarold, Earl of WessexHarold Godwin
Harold Godwinson (c. 1022 – 14 October 1066), often called Harold II, was the last crowned Anglo-Saxon king of England.wikipedia
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Battle of Hastings

HastingsBattleThe Battle of Hastings
Harold reigned from 6 January 1066 until his death at the Battle of Hastings, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England.
The Battle of Hastings was fought on 14 October 1066 between the Norman-French army of William, the Duke of Normandy, and an English army under the Anglo-Saxon King Harold Godwinson, beginning the Norman conquest of England.

Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
Harold reigned from 6 January 1066 until his death at the Battle of Hastings, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England.
Edward died in January 1066 and was succeeded by his brother-in-law Harold Godwinson.

House of Godwin

his sonsGodwin familyGodwinsons
Harold was a powerful earl and member of a prominent Anglo-Saxon family with ties to Cnut the Great. Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
Its most famous member was Harold Godwinson, king of England for nine months in 1066.

Gytha Thorkelsdóttir

GythaCountess GythaGytha, Countess of Wessex
1001–1053), the powerful Earl of Wessex, and of Gytha Thorkelsdóttir, whose brother Ulf the Earl was married to Estrid Svendsdatter (c.
She was the mother of King Harold Godwinson and of Edith of Wessex, queen consort of King Edward the Confessor of England.

Godwin, Earl of Wessex

Earl GodwinGodwinGodwin of Wessex
Harold was a son of Godwin (c.
1020). Godwin was the father of King Harold Godwinson ((r.

Harald Hardrada

Harald HardrådeHarald III of NorwayHarald III
In late September, he successfully repelled an invasion by rival claimant Harald Hardrada of Norway before marching his army back south to meet William the Conqueror at Hastings two weeks later.
Not long after Harald had renounced his claim to Denmark, the former Earl of Northumbria, Tostig Godwinson, brother of the newly chosen (but reigning not for long) English king Harold Godwinson (also known as Harold of Wessex), pledged his allegiance to Harald and invited him to claim the English throne.

Westminster Abbey

WestminsterAbbey of WestminsterAbbot of Westminster
Upon the death of his brother-in-law King Edward the Confessor on 5 January 1066, the Witenagemot convened and chose Harold to succeed; he was the first English monarch to be crowned in Westminster Abbey.
His successor, Harold II, was probably crowned in the abbey, although the first documented coronation is that of William the Conqueror later the same year.

Tostig Godwinson

TostigEarl Tostigthe family of Norse Noblemen
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
undefined 1026 – 25 September 1066) was an Anglo-Saxon Earl of Northumbria and brother of King Harold Godwinson.

Sweyn Godwinson

SweynSwein GodwinsonSvein Godwinson
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
undefined 1020 – 1052), also spelled Swein, was the eldest son of Earl Godwin of Wessex, and brother of Harold II of England.

Earl of Wessex

EarlEarl and Countess of WessexEarldom of Wessex
1001–1053), the powerful Earl of Wessex, and of Gytha Thorkelsdóttir, whose brother Ulf the Earl was married to Estrid Svendsdatter (c.
Upon Godwin's death in 1053, the earldom passed to his son, who later became King Harold II and died at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
1022 – 14 October 1066), often called Harold II, was the last crowned Anglo-Saxon king of England.
His brother-in-law was crowned King Harold, but his cousin William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, immediately claimed the throne for himself.

Wulfnoth Godwinson

Wulfnoth
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
Wulfnoth Godwinson (1040-1094) was a younger brother of Harold II of England, the sixth son of Godwin.

Leofwine Godwinson

Leofwine
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
1035 – 14 October 1066) was a younger brother of King Harold Godwinson, the fifth son of Earl Godwin.

Edward the Confessor

King Edward the ConfessorKing EdwardEdward III the Confessor
Upon the death of his brother-in-law King Edward the Confessor on 5 January 1066, the Witenagemot convened and chose Harold to succeed; he was the first English monarch to be crowned in Westminster Abbey.
When Edward died in 1066, he was succeeded by Harold Godwinson, who was defeated and killed in the same year by the Normans under William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Wulfnoth Cild

Wulfnoth
Godwin was the son of Wulfnoth, probably a thegn and a native of Sussex.
Wulfnoth Cild (died c. 1014) was a South Saxon thegn who is regarded by historians as the probable father of Godwin, Earl of Wessex, and thus the grandfather of King Harold Godwinson.

Gyrth Godwinson

Gyrth
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
undefined 1032 – 14 October 1066) was the fourth son of Earl Godwin, and thus a younger brother of Harold Godwinson.

Edith of Wessex

EdithQueen EdithCaela
Godwin and Gytha had several children—six sons: Sweyn, Harold, Tostig, Gyrth, Leofwine and Wulfnoth; and three daughters: Edith of Wessex (originally named Gytha but renamed Ealdgyth (or Edith) when she married King Edward the Confessor), Gunhild and Ælfgifu.
1020 – 1052), Harold (later Harold II) (c.

Ponthieu

County of PonthieuCount of Ponthieu
In 1064, Harold apparently was shipwrecked at Ponthieu.
Harold Godwinson of England was shipwrecked at Ponthieu, in 1064 and taken captive by Guy I (or Wido according to the Bayeux Tapestry), the then Count of Ponthieu.

Normandy

NormanNormandy, FranceNormandie
Harold also became Earl of Hereford in 1058, and replaced his late father as the focus of opposition to growing Norman influence in England under the restored monarchy (1042–66) of Edward the Confessor, who had spent more than 25 years in exile in Normandy.
Rollo's descendant William became king of England in 1066 after defeating Harold Godwinson, the last of the Anglo-Saxon kings, at the Battle of Hastings, while retaining the fiefdom of Normandy for himself and his descendants.

Earl of Hereford

Earl of Hereford (1199)Earls of HerefordHereford
Harold also became Earl of Hereford in 1058, and replaced his late father as the focus of opposition to growing Norman influence in England under the restored monarchy (1042–66) of Edward the Confessor, who had spent more than 25 years in exile in Normandy.
*Harold Godwinson, Earl of Hereford (later Harold II of England) (1058–1066)

Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeaux TapestryThe Bayeux TapestryMusée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux
The Bayeux Tapestry, and other Norman sources, then record that Harold swore an oath on sacred relics to William to support his claim to the English throne.
The Bayeux Tapestry (, ; Tapisserie de Bayeux or La telle du conquest; Tapete Baiocense) is an embroidered cloth nearly 70 m long and 50 cm tall, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England concerning William, Duke of Normandy, and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings.

Beorn Estrithson

BeornBjorn
Sweyn's lands were divided between Harold and a cousin, Beorn.
Along with Harold Godwinson, Beorn profited from Sweyn's absence by being awarded a share of his land.

Kingdom of Gwynedd

GwyneddKing of GwyneddPrince of Gwynedd
He led a series of successful campaigns (1062–63) against Gruffydd ap Llywelyn of Gwynedd, king of Wales.
Eventually he was defeated by Harold Godwinson in 1063 and later killed by his own men in a deal to secure peace with England.

William the Conqueror

William IWilliam I of EnglandWilliam of Normandy
Harold reigned from 6 January 1066 until his death at the Battle of Hastings, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England.
There were other potential claimants, including the powerful English earl Harold Godwinson whom Edward named as king on his deathbed in January 1066.

More danico

a form of ceremony not recognized by the churchbelowby custom
The relationship was a form of marriage that was not blessed or sanctioned by the Church, known as More danico, or "in the Danish manner", and was accepted by most laypeople in England at the time.
Modern historians have applied the term to various irregular or polygynous unions formed by several other monarchs of the Viking age, including Harald Fairhair, Canute the Great, Harold Godwinson and Cerball mac Dúnlainge.