Harold Hecht

Harold Hecht (June 1, 1907 – May 26, 1985), born in New York City, was a Hollywood film producer (Best Picture "Marty" 1956), dance director and talent agent.wikipedia
747 Related Articles

28th Academy Awards

(28th)195528th
At the 28th Academy Awards ceremony in 1956, Hecht received a Best Picture Oscar for the 1955 Hecht-Lancaster Productions film Marty.

31st Academy Awards

(31st)195831st
He was again nominated three years later at the 31st Academy Awards ceremony for the 1958 Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions film Separate Tables.

Burt Lancaster

Hecht-Lancaster
In 1947, he co-founded Norma Productions, an independent film production company, with his business partner and managed actor, Burt Lancaster.
The show only ran three weeks, but his performance attracted the interest of a Hollywood agent, Harold Hecht.

Academy Award for Best Picture

Best PictureBest Picture OscarOutstanding Production
At the 28th Academy Awards ceremony in 1956, Hecht received a Best Picture Oscar for the 1955 Hecht-Lancaster Productions film Marty.

Sweet Smell of Success

1957 movie of the same name
Three of the films Harold Hecht worked on have been deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States National Film Preservation Board and have been selected for preservation in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry; Sweet Smell of Success in 1993, Marty in 1994 and She Done Him Wrong in 1996.
Harold Hecht refused and asked him to start work on another project – adapting Ernest Lehman’s novellette Sweet Smell of Success into a film.

Marty (film)

MartyMarty'' (film)Marty,
At the 28th Academy Awards ceremony in 1956, Hecht received a Best Picture Oscar for the 1955 Hecht-Lancaster Productions film Marty.

The Crimson Pirate

Crimson Pirate
Hecht's next production for Warner Brothers was The Crimson Pirate, another Technicolor swashbuckler starring Lancaster and Nick Cravat, a close friend since boyhood, and former acrobat who had worked with Lancaster in the circus (he had also co-starred in The Flame and the Arrow). It was directed by Robert Siodmak, written by Roland Kibbee and featured an early appearance by Christopher Lee.
The Crimson Pirate is a 1952 American Technicolor tongue-in-cheek comedy-adventure film from Warner Bros., produced by Norman Deming and Harold Hecht, directed by Robert Siodmak, that stars Burt Lancaster, who also co-produced with Deming and Hecht.

Walter Bernstein

screenwriter
Hecht also signed new talents such as actors Art Smith and Francis McDonald and writers Walter Bernstein, Roland Kibbee and Meta Reis Rosenberg.
Following that stint, he worked for a while for producer Harold Hecht, which resulted in his first screen credit, shared with Ben Maddow, for their adaptation of the Gerald Butler novel Kiss the Blood Off My Hands for the 1948 Universal film.

The Flame and the Arrow

The inaugural picture was The Flame and the Arrow, a Technicolor swashbuckler directed by Jacques Tourneur.
It was directed by Jacques Tourneur and produced by Harold Hecht and Frank Ross from a screenplay by Waldo Salt.

James Hill (producer)

James Hill
It was scored by Dimitri Tiomkin and was the first time that Hecht and Lancaster collaborated with writer James Hill who later became a partner in the company.
He joined Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions as a producer with Harold Hecht and Burt Lancaster after working with them as co-screenwriter on His Majesty O'Keefe.

Gerald Butler (author)

Gerald Butler
Hecht and Lancaster's first production was Kiss the Blood Off My Hands, a film noir based on British author Gerald Butler's best-selling novel.
After the option expired, the novel's film rights were sold to actor-turned-producer Burt Lancaster and his business partner Harold Hecht in mid-1947.

Separate Tables (film)

Separate Tables
He was again nominated three years later at the 31st Academy Awards ceremony for the 1958 Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions film Separate Tables.

BAFTA Award for Best Film

Best FilmBest Film from any SourceBAFTA Award for Best Film from any Source
It was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, the Academy Award for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White and the BAFTA Award for Best Film from any Source.

Run Silent, Run Deep (film)

Run Silent, Run DeepRun Silent Run Deep1958 movie
In early 1958 Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions released Run Silent, Run Deep, a black-and-white submarine war film based on the best-selling novel by highly decorated US Navy officer Edward L. Beach Jr..
Run Silent, Run Deep is a 1958 American black-and-white war film from United Artists, produced by Harold Hecht, directed by Robert Wise, and starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster.

Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama

Best Motion Picture – DramaBest PictureDrama
It was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, the Academy Award for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, the Academy Award for Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture, the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama, the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama, the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress, the Golden Globe Award for Best Director, the Golden Laurel Award for Top Female Dramatic Performance, the Golden Laurel Award for Top Female Supporting Performance, the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Film, the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Written American Drama.

Sam Levene

When nearly all the major Hollywood studios starting coming at Lancaster with offers, his friend and co-star in the play, Sam Levene, an established stage and film actor, offered to represent him.
Together Lancaster and Levene were invited to restaurants, fielding offers from David O. Selznick, 20th Century-Fox and Hal B. Wallis, who had a deal at Paramount Pictures, and ultimately introduced Lancaster to Harold Hecht, his long-time agent and Hollywood film production partner.

Robert Aldrich

AldrichAldrich Robert BurgessRobert B. Aldrich
The two moderate-budget Columbia films were shot back-to-back at Columbia Studios and marked the beginning of a professional relationship between Hecht, Lancaster and Robert Aldrich, who was Hecht's assistant producer at the studio.
Aldrich was assistant to producer Harold Hecht on Ten Tall Men (1951), a French Foreign Legion action film starring Burt Lancaster.

Robert Siodmak

Robert
Hecht's next production for Warner Brothers was The Crimson Pirate, another Technicolor swashbuckler starring Lancaster and Nick Cravat, a close friend since boyhood, and former acrobat who had worked with Lancaster in the circus (he had also co-starred in The Flame and the Arrow). It was directed by Robert Siodmak, written by Roland Kibbee and featured an early appearance by Christopher Lee.
Before leaving for Europe in 1952, following the problematic production The Crimson Pirate for Warner Bros. and producer Harold Hecht, his third and last film with Burt Lancaster (Siodmak dubbed the chaotic experience "The Hecht Follies"), Siodmak had directed some of the era's best films noirs (twelve in all), more than any other director who worked in that style.

McGuire Sisters

the McGuire SistersPhyllis McGuireDorothy McGuire
One notable non-movie hit that Hecht-Lancaster & Buzzell had was the McGuire Sisters's version of May You Always which peaked to No. 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 list in January 1959 and became the second best-selling sheet music in the US.
Buzzell's publishing firm, Hecht-Lancaster & Buzzell Music (co-owned by Harold Hecht and Burt Lancaster) provided two songs for the McGuire Sisters, "May You Always" and "Theme from The Unforgiven (The Need for Love)".

The First Time (1952 film)

The First Time1952The First Time'' (1952 film)
But the real turning point was when Columbia allowed Hecht and Lancaster to produce their first film without Lancaster acting in it. The First Time (released in early 1952) was a comedy film directed by Frank Tashlin starring Robert Cummings and Barbara Hale, based on a short story by Hugo Butler and Jean Rouverol as first-time parents.

The Kentuckian (painting)

The Kentuckian
The painting, also known as The Kentuckian, has been exhibited at a number of museums over the years and is currently part of Los Angeles County Museum of Art's permanent collection.
Both Lancaster and the producer Harold Hecht were admirers of Benton and took the initiative for the commission.

Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (film)

Summer of the Seventeenth DollSeason of Passion
While The Devil's Disciple was shooting in England, Hecht-Hill-Lancaster Productions was simultaneously producing Summer of the Seventeenth Doll in Australia.
The play had reportedly been recommended to Harold Hecht of HHL by Laurence Olivier, who directed the London production.

Hal B. Wallis

Hal WallisHal Wallis ProductionHall Wallis
Together they were invited to restaurants, hearing offers from David O. Selznick, 20th Century-Fox and Hal B. Wallis, who had a deal at Paramount Pictures.

Ten Tall Men

Halburt Productions' first film, Ten Tall Men (released in late 1951) was another Technicolor adventure flick about the French Foreign Legion during the Rif War in Morocco.

Apache (film)

ApacheApache'' (film)film of the same name
Their first production for UA was Apache (released in the summer of 1954), a western told from the perspective of a Native American Apache.