Harry Blackmun

Justice BlackmunBlackmunHarry A. BlackmunJustices BlackmunJustice Harry BlackmunBlackmun JBlackBlackmun, HarrySupreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun
Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 until 1994.wikipedia
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Richard Nixon Supreme Court candidates

1971 nominationconfirmedprevious nominees
After the defeat of two previous nominees, President Richard Nixon successfully nominated Blackmun to the Supreme Court to replace Associate Justice Abe Fortas.
Nixon appointed Warren E. Burger to replace Earl Warren, and during his time in office appointed three other members of the Supreme Court: Associate Justices Harry Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell, and William Rehnquist.

Roe v. Wade

right to chooseRoe vs. WadeRoe v Wade
He is best known as the author of the Court's opinion in Roe v. Wade, which prohibits many state and federal restrictions on abortion.
Providing a historical analysis on abortion, Justice Harry Blackmun noted that abortion was "resorted to without scruple" in Greek and Roman times.

Bowers v. Hardwick

Michael HardwickBowers vs. HardwickHardwick v. Bowers
He wrote dissenting opinions in notable cases such as Furman v. Georgia, Bowers v. Hardwick, and DeShaney v. Winnebago County. It has also been revealed by Blackmun in a 1995 oral history with Harold Koh that his dissent in Bowers v. Hardwick was written by a clerk, Pam Karlan.
The senior dissent, by Justice Harry Blackmun, framed the issue as revolving around the right to privacy.

Harvard Law School

Harvard LawHarvardHarvard University Law School
Raised in Saint Paul, Minnesota, Blackmun graduated from Harvard Law School in 1932.
Past Supreme Court justices from Harvard Law School include Antonin Scalia, David Souter, Harry Blackmun, William J. Brennan, Louis Brandeis, Felix Frankfurter, Lewis Powell (LLM), and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., among others.

Planned Parenthood v. Casey

Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. CaseyPlanned Parenthood of Southeastern Pa. v. CaseyCasey
He joined part of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's opinion in Planned Parenthood v. Casey but also filed a separate opinion, warning that Roe was in jeopardy.
At this point, only two of the Justices were obvious supporters of Roe v. Wade: Harry Blackmun, the author of Roe, and John Paul Stevens, who had joined opinions specifically reaffirming Roe in City of Akron v. Akron Center for Reproductive Health and Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Stanton v. Stanton

Aside from Roe v. Wade, notable majority opinions written by Blackmun include Bates v. State Bar of Arizona, Bigelow v. Commonwealth of Virginia, and Stanton v. Stanton.
Justice Blackmun wrote for the majority.

William Mitchell College of Law

St. Paul College of LawMinnesota College of LawWilliam Mitchell Law Review
He served in a variety of positions including private counsel, law clerk, and adjunct faculty at the University of Minnesota Law School and William Mitchell College of Law (then the St. Paul College of Law).
One of them was Harry Blackmun, a professor at the St. Paul College of Law from 1935 to 1941.

Stephen Breyer

BreyerJustice BreyerStephen G. Breyer
Blackmun retired from the Court during the administration of President Bill Clinton, and was succeeded by Stephen Breyer.
Breyer's appointment came shortly thereafter, however, following the retirement of Harry Blackmun in 1994, when Clinton nominated Breyer as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court on May 17, 1994.

DeShaney v. Winnebago County

DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social ServicesDeShaney v. Winnebago County Dept. of Social Servs.
He wrote dissenting opinions in notable cases such as Furman v. Georgia, Bowers v. Hardwick, and DeShaney v. Winnebago County.
A second, shorter but more famous dissent was written by Associate Justice Harry Blackmun, who had (along with Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall) joined Brennan's dissent.

Nashville, Illinois

NashvilleNashville (Washington)Nashville, IL
Harry Blackmun was born in Nashville, Illinois, to Theo Huegely (Reuter) and Corwin Manning Blackmun.

Harvard Glee Club

Glee ClubHarvardUniversity Glee Club
While at Harvard, Blackmun joined Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity and sang with the Harvard Glee Club (with whom he performed for President Herbert Hoover in 1929, Blackmun's first visit to Washington).

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 until 1994.

Furman v. Georgia

Furmanpre-Furmanpre-''Furman
He wrote dissenting opinions in notable cases such as Furman v. Georgia, Bowers v. Hardwick, and DeShaney v. Winnebago County.
Chief Justice Warren Burger and Justices Harry Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell, and William H. Rehnquist, each appointed by President Richard Nixon, dissented.

Abe Fortas

Fortas(Abe) FortasFortas, Abe
After the defeat of two previous nominees, President Richard Nixon successfully nominated Blackmun to the Supreme Court to replace Associate Justice Abe Fortas.
President Nixon eventually appointed Harry Blackmun as Fortas's replacement after the nominations of Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell had failed.

Bigelow v. Virginia

Bigelow v. Commonwealth of Virginia
Aside from Roe v. Wade, notable majority opinions written by Blackmun include Bates v. State Bar of Arizona, Bigelow v. Commonwealth of Virginia, and Stanton v. Stanton.
Justice Harry Blackmun wrote that the First Amendment "should prevent states from prohibiting advertisements of products or conduct that is clearly legal at the place advertised."

Dorsey & Whitney

Dorsey & Whitney LLPDorsey and Whitney Professor of Law
Blackmun's practice as an attorney at the law firm now known as Dorsey & Whitney focused in its early years on taxation, trusts and estates, and civil litigation.

Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists

Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Defending abortion, in Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Blackmun wrote:
Harry Blackmun's opinion for the Court rejected the Reagan Administration's position, reaffirming Roe.

G. Harrold Carswell

Harrold CarswellG. Harold CarswellGeorge Harrold Carswell
His confirmation followed contentious battles over two previous, failed nominations forwarded by Nixon in 1969–1970, those of Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell.
One week after Judge Carswell's nomination was rejected, Nixon then nominated Minnesota judge Harry Blackmun, subsequently the author of Roe v. Wade, to fill the Fortas vacancy.

William J. Brennan Jr.

Justice BrennanWilliam BrennanWilliam J. Brennan, Jr.
Indeed, Blackmun voted with Burger in 87.5 percent of the closely divided cases during his first five terms (1970 to 1975), and with William J. Brennan, the Court's leading liberal, in only 13 percent.
He was able to convince no other justice of this view, though Justice Harry Blackmun would eventually agree in 1994, after Brennan's retirement.

Pamela S. Karlan

Pamela KarlanPam KarlanKarlan, Pamela S.
It has also been revealed by Blackmun in a 1995 oral history with Harold Koh that his dissent in Bowers v. Hardwick was written by a clerk, Pam Karlan.
She went on to clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun the following year.

Harold Hongju Koh

Harold KohKoh, Harold Hongju
It has also been revealed by Blackmun in a 1995 oral history with Harold Koh that his dissent in Bowers v. Hardwick was written by a clerk, Pam Karlan.
Koh clerked for Associate Justice Harry Blackmun on the U.S. Supreme Court from October 1981 through September 1982.

Joseph Story

Justice StoryStoryJustice Joseph Story
In 1997, Blackmun portrayed Justice Joseph Story in the Steven Spielberg film Amistad, making him the only United States Supreme Court justice to have played a judge in a motion picture.
He was uniquely honored in the historical Steven Spielberg film Amistad when he was portrayed by retired Associate Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court Harry Blackmun.

Unsuccessful nominations to the Supreme Court of the United States

defeateddefeated nomineefailed nominations
His confirmation followed contentious battles over two previous, failed nominations forwarded by Nixon in 1969–1970, those of Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell.
Nixon's third nominee for the Fortas vacancy was Harry Blackmun, who was confirmed by the Senate with no opposition on May 17, 1970.

Amistad (film)

AmistadAmistad'' (film)Amistad [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
In 1997, Blackmun portrayed Justice Joseph Story in the Steven Spielberg film Amistad, making him the only United States Supreme Court justice to have played a judge in a motion picture.
Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun also appears in the film as Justice Joseph Story.

Clement Haynsworth

Clement F. Haynsworth, Jr.Clement F. HaynsworthClement Furman Haynsworth
His confirmation followed contentious battles over two previous, failed nominations forwarded by Nixon in 1969–1970, those of Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell.
Nixon eventually nominated Harry Blackmun, who was confirmed by the Senate.