Harry Nyquist

NyquistNyquist, Harry
Henry Nyquist (, ; February 7, 1889 – April 4, 1976) was a Swedish-born American electronic engineer who made important contributions to communication theory.wikipedia
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Communication theory

communicationcommunications theorycommunication theorist
Henry Nyquist (, ; February 7, 1889 – April 4, 1976) was a Swedish-born American electronic engineer who made important contributions to communication theory.
Harry Nyquist's 1924 paper, Certain Factors Affecting Telegraph Speed, contains a theoretical section quantifying "intelligence" and the "line speed" at which it can be transmitted by a communication system.

Bell Labs

Bell LaboratoriesBell Telephone LaboratoriesAT&T Bell Laboratories
He worked at AT&T's Department of Development and Research from 1917 to 1934, and continued when it became Bell Telephone Laboratories that year, until his retirement in 1954.
In 1928 the thermal noise in a resistor was first measured by John B. Johnson, and Harry Nyquist provided the theoretical analysis; this is now termed Johnson noise.

Hendrik Wade Bode

Hendrik BodeBodeBode, Hendrik Wade
In 1975 Nyquist received together with Hendrik Bode the Rufus Oldenburger Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
He, along with Harry Nyquist, also developed the theoretical conditions applicable to the stability of amplifier circuits.

Stuart Ballantine Medal

In October 1960 he was awarded the Stuart Ballantine Medal of the Franklin Institute "for his theoretical analyses and practical inventions in the field of communications systems during the past forty years including, particularly, his original work in the theories of telegraph transmission, thermal noise in electric conductors, and in the history of feedback systems."

Rufus Oldenburger Medal

Oldenburger MedalRufus Oldenburger laureateRufus T. Oldenburger Medal
In 1975 Nyquist received together with Hendrik Bode the Rufus Oldenburger Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Johnson–Nyquist noise

thermal noiseJohnson noisenoise
As an engineer at Bell Laboratories, Nyquist did important work on thermal noise ("Johnson–Nyquist noise"), the stability of feedback amplifiers, telegraphy, facsimile, television, and other important communications problems.
He described his findings to Harry Nyquist, also at Bell Labs, who was able to explain the results.

University of North Dakota

North DakotaU. of North DakotaNorth Dakota University
He entered the University of North Dakota in 1912 and received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering in 1914 and 1915, respectively.
In the realm of science, notable UND alumni include important contributor to information theory Harry Nyquist, pioneer aviator Carl Ben Eielson, Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, engineer and NASA astronaut Karen L. Nyberg, and leading NASA manager John H. Disher.

Amplifier

amplifiersamplificationelectronic amplifier
As an engineer at Bell Laboratories, Nyquist did important work on thermal noise ("Johnson–Nyquist noise"), the stability of feedback amplifiers, telegraphy, facsimile, television, and other important communications problems.
Other advances in the theory of amplification were made by Harry Nyquist and Hendrik Wade Bode.

Nyquist rate

Nyquist sampling rateNyquist limitNyquist
Long before Harry Nyquist had his name associated with sampling, the term Nyquist rate was used differently, with a meaning closer to what Nyquist actually studied.

Nyquist frequency

Nyquist limitNyquistN/2 different frequencies
The Nyquist frequency, named after electronic engineer Harry Nyquist, is half of the sampling rate of a discrete signal processing system.

Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem

sampling theoremNyquist-Shannon sampling theoremNyquist theorem
This rule is essentially a dual of what is now known as the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem.
The name Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem honours Harry Nyquist and Claude Shannon albeit the fact that it had already been discovered in 1933 by Vladimir Kotelnikov.

Information theory

information-theoreticinformation theoristinformation
His early theoretical work on determining the bandwidth requirements for transmitting information laid the foundations for later advances by Claude Shannon, which led to the development of information theory.
Harry Nyquist's 1924 paper, Certain Factors Affecting Telegraph Speed, contains a theoretical section quantifying "intelligence" and the "line speed" at which it can be transmitted by a communication system, giving the relation

Feedback

feedback loopfeedback loopsfeedback control
As an engineer at Bell Laboratories, Nyquist did important work on thermal noise ("Johnson–Nyquist noise"), the stability of feedback amplifiers, telegraphy, facsimile, television, and other important communications problems.
Harry Nyquist at Bell Labs derived the Nyquist stability criterion for determining the stability of feedback systems.

Nyquist stability criterion

Nyquist plotNyquistNyquist criterion
The Nyquist stability criterion can now be found in all textbooks on feedback control theory.
In control theory and stability theory, the Nyquist stability criterion or Strecker–Nyquist stability criterion, independently discovered by the German electrical engineer Felix Strecker at Siemens in 1930 and the Swedish-American electrical engineer Harry Nyquist at Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1932, is a graphical technique for determining the stability of a dynamical system.

Nyquist filter

The filter is named after the Swedish–US engineer Harry Nyquist (1889–1976).

Nyquist (programming language)

Nyquist
It is an extension of the XLISP dialect of Lisp, and is named after Harry Nyquist.

Harlingen, Texas

HarlingenHarlingen, TXHarlingen Texas
Nyquist lived in Pharr, Texas after his retirement, and died in Harlingen, Texas on April 4, 1976.

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem

Fluctuation dissipation theoremfluctuations and dissipationfluctuation–dissipation theorem
during his annus mirabilis and Harry Nyquist's explanation in 1928 of Johnson noise in electrical resistors.

Electronic engineering

Electronics and Communication EngineeringElectronics Engineeringelectronic engineer
Henry Nyquist (, ; February 7, 1889 – April 4, 1976) was a Swedish-born American electronic engineer who made important contributions to communication theory.

Värmland

VarmlandVermlandProvince of Värmland
Nyquist was born in the village Nilsby of the parish Stora Kil, Värmland, Sweden.

Doctor of Philosophy

Ph.D.PhDPh.D
He received a Ph.D. in physics at Yale University in 1917.