Harvard Department of Social Relations

Department of Social RelationsSocial RelationsHarvard's Department of Social RelationsPsychology and Social Relations DepartmentDepartment of Social Relations at HarvardHarvard University Department of Social Relationssocial relations department
The Department of Social Relations for Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies, more commonly known as the "Department of Social Relations", was an interdisciplinary collaboration among three of the social science departments at Harvard University (anthropology, psychology, and sociology) beginning in 1946.wikipedia
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Talcott Parsons

ParsonsParsonianParsons, Talcot
While the name "Social Relations" is often associated with the program's long-time chair and guiding spirit, sociologist Talcott Parsons, many major figures of mid-20th-century social science also numbered among the program's faculty, including psychologists Gordon Allport (personality and motivation), Jerome Bruner (cognitive psychology and narrative analysis), Roger Brown (social psychology and psycholinguistics), and Henry Murray (personality); anthropologists Clyde and Florence Kluckhohn (value orientations), John and Beatrice Whiting (cross-cultural child development), Evon Z. Vogt (comparative religion); and sociologist Alex Inkeles (Soviet studies and national character).
Later, he was instrumental in the establishment of the Department of Social Relations at Harvard.

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
The Department of Social Relations for Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies, more commonly known as the "Department of Social Relations", was an interdisciplinary collaboration among three of the social science departments at Harvard University (anthropology, psychology, and sociology) beginning in 1946.
The second tradition of structuralist thought, contemporaneous with Giddens, emerges from the American school of social network analysis, spearheaded by the Harvard Department of Social Relations led by Harrison White and his students in the 1970s and 1980s.

Charles Tilly

Tilly, CharlesTillyTilly, C.
While at Harvard, he was a student in the Department of Social Relations during the "Harvard revolution" in social network analysis.

Clyde Kluckhohn

Clyde and Florence KluckhohnClyde K. KluckhohnClyde K. M. Kluckhohn
He remained at Harvard as a professor in Social Anthropology and later also Social Relations for the rest of his life.

Bertram Cohler

Bertram J. Cohler
He then studied at Harvard University in the Department of Social Relations, an interdisciplinary collaboration among the departments of psychology, sociology, and anthropology.

Harold Garfinkel

Garfinkel
After the war, Garfinkel went to study at Harvard and met Talcott Parsons at the newly formed Department of Social Relations at Harvard University.

Edward Laumann

Edward O. LaumannLaumann, Edward O.
Laumann earned his Ph.D. in the Harvard Department of Social Relations in 1964, where he studied under George Homans, Talcott Parsons, and Harrison White.

Harrison White

Harrison C. WhiteHarrison Colyar Whiterevolution
In 1963, White left Chicago to be an associate professor of sociology at the Harvard Department of Social Relations -- the same department founded by Talcott Parsons and still heavily influenced by the structural-functionalist paradigm of Parsons.

Beatrice Blyth Whiting

Beatrice WhitingBeaBeatrice
Together with her husband John Whiting, she was a key figure in the Harvard Department of Social Relations and a pioneer in the cross-cultural study of childhood and child development.

John Whiting (anthropologist)

John WhitingJohnJohn W. M. Whiting
In 1963 he transferred to the Department of Social Relations, where he taught and conducted research in anthropology and comparative child development.

Marc Swartz

Marc J. SwartzMarc Jerome Swartz
Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Swartz trained in anthropology in the interdisciplinary Department of Social Relations at Harvard, receiving his PhD in 1958.

Neil Smelser

Neil J. SmelserN. SmelserSmelser, N. J.
He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University in 1952 in the Department of Social Relations.

Barry Wellman

Networked individualism
He received a M.A. in Social Relations in 1965 and a Ph.D. in Sociology in 1969.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeUniversity of Harvard
The Department of Social Relations for Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies, more commonly known as the "Department of Social Relations", was an interdisciplinary collaboration among three of the social science departments at Harvard University (anthropology, psychology, and sociology) beginning in 1946.

Anthropology

anthropologistanthropologicalanthropologists
The Department of Social Relations for Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies, more commonly known as the "Department of Social Relations", was an interdisciplinary collaboration among three of the social science departments at Harvard University (anthropology, psychology, and sociology) beginning in 1946.

Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologists
The Department of Social Relations for Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies, more commonly known as the "Department of Social Relations", was an interdisciplinary collaboration among three of the social science departments at Harvard University (anthropology, psychology, and sociology) beginning in 1946.

Social relation

social interactionsocial relationssocial interactions
While the name "Social Relations" is often associated with the program's long-time chair and guiding spirit, sociologist Talcott Parsons, many major figures of mid-20th-century social science also numbered among the program's faculty, including psychologists Gordon Allport (personality and motivation), Jerome Bruner (cognitive psychology and narrative analysis), Roger Brown (social psychology and psycholinguistics), and Henry Murray (personality); anthropologists Clyde and Florence Kluckhohn (value orientations), John and Beatrice Whiting (cross-cultural child development), Evon Z. Vogt (comparative religion); and sociologist Alex Inkeles (Soviet studies and national character).

Gordon Allport

Gordon W. AllportAllportBecoming
While the name "Social Relations" is often associated with the program's long-time chair and guiding spirit, sociologist Talcott Parsons, many major figures of mid-20th-century social science also numbered among the program's faculty, including psychologists Gordon Allport (personality and motivation), Jerome Bruner (cognitive psychology and narrative analysis), Roger Brown (social psychology and psycholinguistics), and Henry Murray (personality); anthropologists Clyde and Florence Kluckhohn (value orientations), John and Beatrice Whiting (cross-cultural child development), Evon Z. Vogt (comparative religion); and sociologist Alex Inkeles (Soviet studies and national character).

Jerome Bruner

BrunerJerome S. BrunerBruner, Jerome
While the name "Social Relations" is often associated with the program's long-time chair and guiding spirit, sociologist Talcott Parsons, many major figures of mid-20th-century social science also numbered among the program's faculty, including psychologists Gordon Allport (personality and motivation), Jerome Bruner (cognitive psychology and narrative analysis), Roger Brown (social psychology and psycholinguistics), and Henry Murray (personality); anthropologists Clyde and Florence Kluckhohn (value orientations), John and Beatrice Whiting (cross-cultural child development), Evon Z. Vogt (comparative religion); and sociologist Alex Inkeles (Soviet studies and national character).

Roger Brown (psychologist)

Roger BrownAlbert GilmanRoger William Brown
While the name "Social Relations" is often associated with the program's long-time chair and guiding spirit, sociologist Talcott Parsons, many major figures of mid-20th-century social science also numbered among the program's faculty, including psychologists Gordon Allport (personality and motivation), Jerome Bruner (cognitive psychology and narrative analysis), Roger Brown (social psychology and psycholinguistics), and Henry Murray (personality); anthropologists Clyde and Florence Kluckhohn (value orientations), John and Beatrice Whiting (cross-cultural child development), Evon Z. Vogt (comparative religion); and sociologist Alex Inkeles (Soviet studies and national character).

Zuni

Zuni peopleZuñiZuni Indians
Major projects included the Six Cultures Study (headed by John and Beatrice Whiting, an anthropological study of child development in six different cultures, including a New England Baptist community; a Philippine barrio; an Okinawan village; an Indian village in Mexico; a northern Indian caste group; and a rural tribal group in Kenya); a multidisciplinary analysis of Soviet culture and society, published in part as How the Soviet System Works; and the Comparative Study of Values in Five Cultures during the 1950s, which examined five very different communities living in the same region of Texas: Zuni, Navajo, Mormon (LDS), Spanish-American (Mexican-American), and Texas Homesteaders.

Navajo

Navajo peopleNavajosDiné
Major projects included the Six Cultures Study (headed by John and Beatrice Whiting, an anthropological study of child development in six different cultures, including a New England Baptist community; a Philippine barrio; an Okinawan village; an Indian village in Mexico; a northern Indian caste group; and a rural tribal group in Kenya); a multidisciplinary analysis of Soviet culture and society, published in part as How the Soviet System Works; and the Comparative Study of Values in Five Cultures during the 1950s, which examined five very different communities living in the same region of Texas: Zuni, Navajo, Mormon (LDS), Spanish-American (Mexican-American), and Texas Homesteaders.

Mormons

MormonLDSMormon community
Major projects included the Six Cultures Study (headed by John and Beatrice Whiting, an anthropological study of child development in six different cultures, including a New England Baptist community; a Philippine barrio; an Okinawan village; an Indian village in Mexico; a northern Indian caste group; and a rural tribal group in Kenya); a multidisciplinary analysis of Soviet culture and society, published in part as How the Soviet System Works; and the Comparative Study of Values in Five Cultures during the 1950s, which examined five very different communities living in the same region of Texas: Zuni, Navajo, Mormon (LDS), Spanish-American (Mexican-American), and Texas Homesteaders.

Melvin Ember

M. EmberEmber, Melvin
A similar program at Yale, the Institute for Human Relations, also now disbanded, developed the Human Relations Area Files (HRAF), a cross-cultural database for comparative research, administered by Carol and Melvin Ember.