Hasidic philosophy

Hasidic thoughtChassidusChassidismChassidutHasidismChasidic philosophyChasidutHasidicHasidusHasidut
Hasidic philosophy or Hasidism, alternatively transliterated as Hasidut or Chassidus, consists of the teachings of the Hasidic movement, which are the teachings of the Hasidic rebbes, often in the form of commentary on the Torah (the Five books of Moses) and Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism).wikipedia
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Devekut

dveikusdeveikutdeveikus
The Baal Shem Tov taught that the end of worship of God is attachment to God (devekut), which primarily is the service of the heart rather than the mind.
With its emphasis on Divine Omnipresence, Hasidic philosophy sought to unify all aspects of spiritual and material life, to reveal their inner Divinity.

Jewish mysticism

mysticalmysticismJewish mystics
Hasidic philosophy or Hasidism, alternatively transliterated as Hasidut or Chassidus, consists of the teachings of the Hasidic movement, which are the teachings of the Hasidic rebbes, often in the form of commentary on the Torah (the Five books of Moses) and Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism).

Rebbe

AdmorRebbesGrand Rebbe
Hasidic philosophy or Hasidism, alternatively transliterated as Hasidut or Chassidus, consists of the teachings of the Hasidic movement, which are the teachings of the Hasidic rebbes, often in the form of commentary on the Torah (the Five books of Moses) and Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism).
On the basis of traditional Kabbalistic concepts and terminology, Hasidic philosophy bridged deveikut, a Jewish concept referring to closeness to God, to the Hasidic rebbe, embodying and channeling the Divine flow of blessing to the world, because Creation is dependent on the continuous flow of Divine lifeforce, without which it would revert to nothingness.

Sefirot

SephirotSephirahSephiroth
Hasidic exegesis differs from Kabbalistic schools as it focuses somewhat less on the sefirot and partzufim and more on binary types of oppositions (e.g. body and soul).
In Hasidic philosophy, which has sought to internalise the experience of Jewish mysticism into daily inspiration (devekut), this inner life of the sefirot is explored, and the role they play in man's service of God in this world.

Menachem Mendel of Kotzk

Kotzker RebbeKotzkKotsk
One extreme and renowned philosopher who emerged from the Przysucha School was Menachem Mendel of Kotzk.
Born to a non-Hasidic family in Goraj near Lublin, Poland, he became attracted to Hasidus in his youth.

Chabad

Chabad-LubavitchChabad LubavitchLubavitch
The Chabad school, limited to its namesake dynasty, but prominent, was founded by Shneur Zalman of Liadi and was elaborated by his successors, until the late 20th century.
It is the first schematic treatment of Hasidic moral philosophy and its metaphysical foundations.

Qliphoth

QliphahSitra AhraKelipot
According to Lurianic doctrine, The netherworld was suffused with divine sparks, concealed within "husks", Qliphoth.
In Hasidic philosophy, the kabbalistic scheme of qlippot is internalised in psychological experience as self-focus, opposite to holy devekut self-nullification, underlying its Panentheistic Monistic view of qlippot as the illusionary self-awareness of Creation.

Ohel (grave)

ohelohelimohalim
In prewar Poland, the ohel of a Rebbe was located close by the Hasidic court, and was big enough to accommodate a minyan of ten men beside the grave.

Tanya

beinoniLikutei Amarim (Tanya)Sefer HaTanya
The Tanya is an early work of Hasidic philosophy, by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the founder of Chabad Hasidism, first published in 1797.

Tzadik

tzaddiktzaddikimZaddik
In the movement's sacral literature, this person is referred to as the Tzaddiq, the Righteous One — often also known by the general honorific Admor (acronym of Hebrew for "our master, teacher and Rabbi"), granted to rabbis in general, or colloquially as rebbe. Among them are Elimelech of Lizhensk, who further developed the Hasidic doctrine of the Tzaddik (mystical leader) that gave rise to many Polish Hasidic dynasties, also notable are the teachings of his brother Zushya of Anipoli.
Adapting former Kabbalistic theosophical terminology, Hasidic philosophy internalised mystical experience, emphasising devekut attachment to its Rebbe leadership, who embody and channel the Divine flow of blessing to the world.

Immanence

immanentDivine immanenceimmanentism
The most fundamental theme underlying all Hasidic theory is the immanence of God in the universe, often expressed in a phrase from the Tikunei haZohar, "Leit Atar panuy mi-néya" (Aramaic: "no site is devoid of it").
Other Bible commentators, the Kabbalah, and Hasidic philosophy, use hidden approaches.

Elimelech of Lizhensk

ElimelechNoam ElimelechElimelech Lipman
Among them are Elimelech of Lizhensk, who further developed the Hasidic doctrine of the Tzaddik (mystical leader) that gave rise to many Polish Hasidic dynasties, also notable are the teachings of his brother Zushya of Anipoli.
Rebbi Elimelech authored the classic work Noam Elimelech.

Shneur Zalman of Liadi

Schneur Zalman of LiadiSchneur ZalmanBaal HaTanya
The Chabad school, limited to its namesake dynasty, but prominent, was founded by Shneur Zalman of Liadi and was elaborated by his successors, until the late 20th century.
He produced works of both mysticism and Jewish law.

Ein Sof

Ain SophAin Soph AurAyn Sof
In the beginning, God had to contract (Tzimtzum) His omnipresence or infinity, the Ein Sof.
This explanation was accepted and expanded upon in later works of Kabbalah and Hasidic philosophy.

Menachem Nachum Twersky

Menachem Nachum Twerski of ChernobylMenachem Nachum of ChernobylMenachem Nachum Twerski
With the advent of Chassidism, Twersky became a disciple of the Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Hasidism.

Chabad philosophy

ChabadChabad Hasidic philosophyintellectual underpinnings
Seder Hishtalshelus, meaning "Order of Development/Evolution", refers in Kabbalah and Hasidic thought to the chain-like descent of Spiritual Worlds (Olam/Olamot) between God and Creation.

Dov Ber of Mezeritch

Maggid of MezeritchDovber of MezeritchDovber
Hasidic philosophy begins with the teachings of Yisroel ben Eliezer known as the Baal Shem Tov and his successors (most notably Dov Ber the Maggid of Mezeritch and his students).
This could be achieved by the perception of the omnipresent Divine immanence in all things, from understanding the inner mystical Torah teachings of Hasidic thought.

Abraham Joshua Heschel

Abraham HeschelRabbi Abraham Joshua HeschelSylvia Straus
Heschel explicated many facets of Jewish thought, including studies on medieval Jewish philosophy, Kabbalah, and Hasidic philosophy.

Norman Lamm

Rabbi Norman Lamm
In accompaniment, in 1999 Lamm published The Religious Thought of Hasidism: Text and Commentary, which offered an in-depth development of formative Hasidic thought, the mystical teachings of the movement founded in the 18th century by the Baal Shem Tov.

Lurianic Kabbalah

LurianicLurianic doctrineLurianic Kabbalistic
The difficulty of separating the movement's philosophy from that of its main inspiration, Lurianic Kabbalah, and determining what was novel and what merely a recapitulation, also baffled historians.
Rather, to Hasidic thought, especially in its Chabad systemisation, the Atzmus ultimate Divine essence is expressed only in finitude, emphasising Hasidic Immanence.

Hasidic Judaism

HasidicHasidismHasidim
Hasidic philosophy or Hasidism, alternatively transliterated as Hasidut or Chassidus, consists of the teachings of the Hasidic movement, which are the teachings of the Hasidic rebbes, often in the form of commentary on the Torah (the Five books of Moses) and Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism).

Torah

PentateuchLawWritten Torah
Hasidic philosophy or Hasidism, alternatively transliterated as Hasidut or Chassidus, consists of the teachings of the Hasidic movement, which are the teachings of the Hasidic rebbes, often in the form of commentary on the Torah (the Five books of Moses) and Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism). Hasidism deals with a range of spiritual concepts such as God, the soul, and the Torah, dealing with esoteric matters but often making them understandable, applicable and finding practical expressions.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
Hasidism deals with a range of spiritual concepts such as God, the soul, and the Torah, dealing with esoteric matters but often making them understandable, applicable and finding practical expressions.

Soul

soulsspirithuman soul
Hasidism deals with a range of spiritual concepts such as God, the soul, and the Torah, dealing with esoteric matters but often making them understandable, applicable and finding practical expressions.

Ashkenazi Hasidim

Chassidei AshkenazHasidei Ashkenazpietist
Etymologically, the term, "hasid" is a title used for various pious individuals and by various Jewish groups since Biblical times, and an earlier movement, the Hasidei Ashkenaz of medieval Germany was also called by this name.