Haskell Curry

CurryCurry, HaskellH. CurryHaskell B. Curry
Haskell Brooks Curry (September 12, 1900 – September 1, 1982) was an American mathematician and logician.wikipedia
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Combinatory logic

combinatorcombinator calculuscombinators
Curry is best known for his work in combinatory logic.
It was introduced by Moses Schönfinkel and Haskell Curry, and has more recently been used in computer science as a theoretical model of computation and also as a basis for the design of functional programming languages.

Curry–Howard correspondence

Curry–Howard isomorphismCurry-Howard correspondencepropositions-as-types
Curry is also known for Curry's paradox and the Curry–Howard correspondence.
It is a generalization of a syntactic analogy between systems of formal logic and computational calculi that was first discovered by the American mathematician Haskell Curry and logician William Alvin Howard.

Curry's paradox

Löb's paradoxCurry paradox
Curry is also known for Curry's paradox and the Curry–Howard correspondence.
The paradox is named after the logician Haskell Curry.

Haskell (programming language)

HaskellHaskell programming languageHackage
There are three programming languages named after him, Haskell, Brook and Curry, as well as the concept of currying, a technique used for transforming functions in mathematics and computer science.
It is named after logician Haskell Curry.

Currying

curriedcurried formcurries
There are three programming languages named after him, Haskell, Brook and Curry, as well as the concept of currying, a technique used for transforming functions in mathematics and computer science.
and further developed by Haskell Curry.

Moses Schönfinkel

Moses (Ilyich) SchönfinkelSchönfinkelSchönfinkel, Moses
While the initial concept of combinatory logic was based on a single paper by Moses Schönfinkel, Curry did much of the development.
This replacement mechanism simplifies work in both combinatory logic and lambda calculus and would later be called currying, after Haskell Curry.

Samuel Silas Curry

Curry was born on September 12, 1900, in Millis, Massachusetts, to Samuel Silas Curry and Anna Baright Curry, who ran a school for elocution.
Samuel and Anna had six children, including the well-known mathematician Haskell Curry.

Anna Baright Curry

Anna Baright
Curry was born on September 12, 1900, in Millis, Massachusetts, to Samuel Silas Curry and Anna Baright Curry, who ran a school for elocution.

Kleene–Rosser paradox

Towards the end of 1933, he learned of the Kleene–Rosser paradox from correspondence with John Rosser.
In mathematics, the Kleene–Rosser paradox is a paradox that shows that certain systems of formal logic are inconsistent, in particular the version of Curry's combinatory logic introduced in 1930, and Church's original lambda calculus, introduced in 1932–1933, both originally intended as systems of formal logic.

David Hilbert

HilbertHilbert, DavidD. Hilbert
Curry was supervised by David Hilbert and worked closely with Bernays, receiving a Ph.D. in 1930 with a dissertation on combinatory logic.

Paul Bernays

BernaysP. BernaysBernays, Paul
Schönfinkel's work had anticipated much of Curry's own research, and as a consequence, he moved to University of Göttingen where he could work with Heinrich Behmann and Paul Bernays, who were familiar with Schönfinkel's work.

Robert Feys

Feys, Robert
Under a Fulbright fellowship, he collaborated with Robert Feys in Louvain, Belgium.
In 1958 Feys and Haskell B. Curry devised the type inference algorithm for the simply typed lambda calculus (Combinatory Logic I).

Mathematics

mathematicalmathmathematician
Haskell Curry defined mathematics simply as "the science of formal systems".

Formalism (philosophy of mathematics)

formalismformalistFormalism (mathematics)
His preferred philosophy of mathematics was formalism (cf.
Other formalists, such as Rudolf Carnap, Alfred Tarski and Haskell Curry, considered mathematics to be the investigation of formal axiom systems.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Haskell Brooks Curry (September 12, 1900 – September 1, 1982) was an American mathematician and logician.

Mathematician

mathematiciansapplied mathematicianMathematics
Haskell Brooks Curry (September 12, 1900 – September 1, 1982) was an American mathematician and logician.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
Haskell Brooks Curry (September 12, 1900 – September 1, 1982) was an American mathematician and logician.

Programming language

programming languageslanguagedialect
There are three programming languages named after him, Haskell, Brook and Curry, as well as the concept of currying, a technique used for transforming functions in mathematics and computer science.

BrookGPU

Brook
There are three programming languages named after him, Haskell, Brook and Curry, as well as the concept of currying, a technique used for transforming functions in mathematics and computer science.

Curry (programming language)

Curry
There are three programming languages named after him, Haskell, Brook and Curry, as well as the concept of currying, a technique used for transforming functions in mathematics and computer science.

Millis, Massachusetts

MillisMillis, MAMillis Public Library
Curry was born on September 12, 1900, in Millis, Massachusetts, to Samuel Silas Curry and Anna Baright Curry, who ran a school for elocution.

Elocution

enunciationelocutionisteloquence
Curry was born on September 12, 1900, in Millis, Massachusetts, to Samuel Silas Curry and Anna Baright Curry, who ran a school for elocution.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeUniversity of Harvard
He entered Harvard University in 1916 to study medicine but switched to mathematics before graduating in 1920.

Principia Mathematica

Principiaramified theory of typesRamified type theory
Curry's interest in mathematical logic started during this period when he was introduced to the Principia Mathematica, the attempt by Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell to ground mathematics in symbolic logic.

Alfred North Whitehead

WhiteheadA. N. WhiteheadA.N. Whitehead
Curry's interest in mathematical logic started during this period when he was introduced to the Principia Mathematica, the attempt by Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell to ground mathematics in symbolic logic.