Haun's Mill massacre

Haun's MillHaun's Mill, MissouriattackedHauns Mill MassacreHaun’s Millhistoric eventincidents of massacremass killingmassacred at Haun's Mill
The Haun’s Mill Massacre (also Hawn’s Mill Massacre) was an event in the history of the Latter Day Saint movement.wikipedia
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Caldwell County, Missouri

Caldwell CountyCaldwell Caldwell County, Missouri
It occurred on October 30, 1838, when a mob/militia unit from Livingston County, Missouri attacked a Mormon settlement in eastern Caldwell County, Missouri, after the Battle of Crooked River.
A few Mormon settlers, who had been evicted from Jackson County, Missouri, moved into the county in 1832, and included Jacob Haun, whose mill on Shoal Creek would become the scene of the bloodiest incident in the Mormon War, known as the Haun's Mill Massacre.

1838 Mormon War

Mormon WarMissouri Mormon WarMormon War (1838)
By far the bloodiest event in the 1838 Mormon War in Missouri, it has long been remembered by the members of the Latter Day Saint movement.
During the conflict 22 people were killed (three Mormons and one non-Mormon at Battle of Crooked Creek, one Mormon prisoner fatally injured while in custody, and 17 Mormons at Haun’s Mill ) and an unknown number of non-combatants died due to exposure and hardship as a result of being expelled from their homes in Missouri.

Latter Day Saint movement

Latter Day SaintLatter-Day SaintsLatter-day Saint movement
By far the bloodiest event in the 1838 Mormon War in Missouri, it has long been remembered by the members of the Latter Day Saint movement.
After the church in Ohio collapsed due to a financial crisis and dissensions, in 1838, Smith and the body of the church moved to Missouri where they were persecuted (see Hauns Mill Massacre) and finally forced to Illinois.

Amanda Barnes Smith

Members of the militia entered the shop and found 10-year-old Sardius Smith, 7-year-old Alma Smith (sons of Amanda Barnes Smith), and 9-year-old Charles Merrick hiding under the blacksmith's bellows.
She survived the Haun's Mill massacre of 1838 in Missouri.

Livingston County, Missouri

LivingstonLivingston CountyMissouri
It occurred on October 30, 1838, when a mob/militia unit from Livingston County, Missouri attacked a Mormon settlement in eastern Caldwell County, Missouri, after the Battle of Crooked River. At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith, Jr.Joseph Smith Jr.Joseph
It appears that Hawn had received Joseph Smith's direction to relocate to Far West but did not convey this direction to any of the others at Hawn's Mill.
On October 30, a party of Missourians surprised and killed seventeen Mormons in the Haun's Mill massacre.

Missouri Executive Order 44

Extermination Orderan executive orderExecutive Order 44
Although the massacre took place a few days after Missouri's governor, Lilburn Boggs, issued his infamous Missouri Executive Order 44 ("Extermination Order" of 1838) there is debate if the participants in the massacre knew of it.
Many people connect Governor Boggs' order directly to the Haun's Mill massacre.

List of massacres in the United States

List of massacres in CaliforniaList of massacres in ArizonaList of massacres in Illinois

Mountain Meadows Massacre

Mountain Meadow MassacreMountain Meadowsattack and destroy the Baker–Fancher emigrant train

History of the Latter Day Saint movement

Mormon historyhistoryhistory of Mormonism
The Haun’s Mill Massacre (also Hawn’s Mill Massacre) was an event in the history of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Militia

militiasmilitiamenhome guard militia
It occurred on October 30, 1838, when a mob/militia unit from Livingston County, Missouri attacked a Mormon settlement in eastern Caldwell County, Missouri, after the Battle of Crooked River.

Mormons

MormonLDSMormon community
It occurred on October 30, 1838, when a mob/militia unit from Livingston County, Missouri attacked a Mormon settlement in eastern Caldwell County, Missouri, after the Battle of Crooked River.

Battle of Crooked River

at Crooked Creekattacked and killed members of the Missouri state militiaBattle of Crooked Creek
It occurred on October 30, 1838, when a mob/militia unit from Livingston County, Missouri attacked a Mormon settlement in eastern Caldwell County, Missouri, after the Battle of Crooked River.

Mill (grinding)

millmillingmills
Hawn’s Mill was a mill established on the banks of Shoal Creek in Fairview Township, Caldwell County, Missouri in 1835–1836 by Jacob Hawn.

Blacksmith

blacksmithingblacksmithsblacksmith shop
However, by October 1838 there were approximately 75 Mormon families living along the banks of Shoal Creek, about 30 of them in the immediate vicinity of Hawn's Mill and the James Houston blacksmith shop.

Massacre

massacresmassacredmass execution
The unauthorized militia involved in the massacre was led overall by Colonel Thomas Jennings, of Livingston County with William O. Jennings (Sheriff of Livingston County), Nehemiah Comstock, and William Gee as captains of the three companies.

Daviess County, Missouri

Daviess CountyDaviessDaviess Counties
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Ray County, Missouri

Ray CountyRay Ray County, Missouri
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Carroll County, Missouri

Carroll CountyCarrollMissouri
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Chariton County, Missouri

Chariton CountyCharitonChariton counties
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Missouri General Assembly

Missouri State LegislatureMissouri LegislatureGeneral Assembly
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Municipal clerk

County Clerktown clerkCity Clerk
At the time of the attack the militia consisted of 240 men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, and included prominent men such as Major Daniel Ashby of the Missouri state legislature and Thomas R. Bryan, Clerk of Livingston County.

Lilburn Boggs

Lilburn W. BoggsGovernor BoggsGovernor Bogg
Although the massacre took place a few days after Missouri's governor, Lilburn Boggs, issued his infamous Missouri Executive Order 44 ("Extermination Order" of 1838) there is debate if the participants in the massacre knew of it.