Hawaiian Islands

Sandwich IslandsHawaiiHawaiianHawaiian islandHawaiian archipelagoislandislandsGeography of HawaiiHawai'ian IslandsHawaii Islands
The Hawaiian Islands (Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1500 mi from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll.wikipedia
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Hawaii (island)

Hawaiiisland of HawaiiBig Island
The Hawaiian Islands (Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1500 mi from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll.
It is the largest and the southeasternmost of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of volcanic islands in the North Pacific Ocean.

Seamount

seamountssea mountseamount chain
The Hawaiian Islands (Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1500 mi from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll.
In recent years, several active seamounts have been observed, for example Loihi in the Hawaiian Islands.

James Cook

Captain CookCaptain James CookCook
Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the Sandwich Islands, a name that James Cook chose in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.
He made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand.

Hawaii

State of HawaiiHawaiʻiHI
The state of Hawaii occupies the archipelago almost in its entirety (including the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), with the sole exception of Midway Island, which instead separately belongs to the United States as one of its unincorporated territories within the United States Minor Outlying Islands. Except for Midway, which is an unincorporated territory of the United States, these islands and islets are administered as Hawaii—the 50th state of the United States.
The state encompasses nearly the entire Hawaiian archipelago, 137 islands spread over 1500 mi.

Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

Northwest Hawaiian IslandsHawaiiHawaiian island
The state of Hawaii occupies the archipelago almost in its entirety (including the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), with the sole exception of Midway Island, which instead separately belongs to the United States as one of its unincorporated territories within the United States Minor Outlying Islands.
The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands or Leeward Islands are the small islands and atolls in the Hawaiian island chain located northwest (in some cases, far to the northwest) of the islands of Kauai and Niihau.

Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain

Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chainEmperor SeamountsHawaiian – Emperor seamount chain
The Hawaiian Islands are the exposed peaks of a great undersea mountain range known as the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain, formed by volcanic activity over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle.
It is composed of the Hawaiian ridge, consisting of the islands of the Hawaiian chain northwest to Kure Atoll, and the Emperor Seamounts: together they form a vast underwater mountain region of islands and intervening seamounts, atolls, shallows, banks and reefs along a line trending southeast to northwest beneath the northern Pacific Ocean.

Midway Atoll

Midway IslandMidwayMidway Islands
The state of Hawaii occupies the archipelago almost in its entirety (including the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), with the sole exception of Midway Island, which instead separately belongs to the United States as one of its unincorporated territories within the United States Minor Outlying Islands. Except for Midway, which is an unincorporated territory of the United States, these islands and islets are administered as Hawaii—the 50th state of the United States.
Midway continues to be the only island in the Hawaiian archipelago that is not part of the state of Hawaii.

Hotspot (geology)

hotspothotspotshot spot
The Hawaiian Islands are the exposed peaks of a great undersea mountain range known as the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain, formed by volcanic activity over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle. This chain of islands, or archipelago, developed as the Pacific Plate slowly moved northwestward over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle at a rate of approximately 32 mi per million years.
The origins of the concept of hotspots lie in the work of J. Tuzo Wilson, who postulated in 1963 that the formation of the Hawaiian Islands resulted from the slow movement of a tectonic plate across a hot region beneath the surface.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Except for Midway, which is an unincorporated territory of the United States, these islands and islets are administered as Hawaii—the 50th state of the United States.
The date of the first settlements of the Hawaiian Islands is a topic of continuing debate.

Volcano

volcanicvolcanoesvolcanic igneous activity
The Hawaiian Islands are the exposed peaks of a great undersea mountain range known as the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain, formed by volcanic activity over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle.
The Hawaiian Islands are said to have been formed in such a manner; so has the Snake River Plain, with the Yellowstone Caldera being the part of the North American plate above the hot spot.

Pearl and Hermes Atoll

Pearl and Hermes ReefHermes AtollPearl and Hermes (Holoikauaua)
The Pearl and Hermes Atoll (Holoikauaua) is part of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, a group of small islands and atolls that form the farthest northwest portion of the Hawaiian island chain.

Kaʻula

KaulaKa'ulaKaula Island
Kaʻula Island, also called Kaʻula Rock, is a small, crescent-shaped offshore islet in the Hawaiian Islands.

French Frigate Shoals

Disappearing IslandFrench Frigate Shoals (Kānemiloha)Tern Island
Although there is no evidence of extensive human activity or presence in the area, the earliest human visitors to the French Frigate Shoals probably came from the main Hawaiian Islands, which were settled by Polynesians between 1100 and 1300 AD.

Makapuʻu

MakapuuMakapuu PointMakapu'u
Makapuu is the extreme eastern end of the Island of Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands, comprising the remnant of a ridge that rises 647 feet (197 m) above the sea.

Island

islandsIsland Groupoceanic island
The Hawaiian Islands (Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1500 mi from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll.
An example is the Hawaiian Islands, from Hawaii to Kure, which continue beneath the sea surface in a more northerly direction as the Emperor Seamounts.

Archipelago

Island grouparchipelagicarchipelagos
The Hawaiian Islands (Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1500 mi from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. This chain of islands, or archipelago, developed as the Pacific Plate slowly moved northwestward over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle at a rate of approximately 32 mi per million years.
The Hawai'ian Islands and Easter Island in the Pacific, and Île Amsterdam in the south Indian Ocean are examples.

Mānana

Mānana IslandRabbit IslandManana
Mānana Island is an uninhabited islet located 0.75 mi off Kaupō Beach, near Makapuu at the eastern end of the island of Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands.

Kīlauea

KilaueaKilauea VolcanoKīlauea volcano
Kīlauea had been erupting nearly continuously since 1983 when it stopped August 2018.
Kīlauea is an active shield volcano in the Hawaiian Islands that last erupted between 1983 and 2018.

Pacific Plate

PacificPacific tectonic platePacific crust
This chain of islands, or archipelago, developed as the Pacific Plate slowly moved northwestward over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle at a rate of approximately 32 mi per million years.
The Pacific Plate contains an interior hot spot forming the Hawaiian Islands.

John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich

Lord SandwichEarl of SandwichThe Earl of Sandwich
Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the Sandwich Islands, a name that James Cook chose in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.
In honour of Sandwich, Cook named the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii) after him, as well as Montague Island off the south east coast of Australia, the South Sandwich Islands in the Southern Atlantic Ocean and Montague Island in the Gulf of Alaska.

Necker Island (Hawaii)

Necker IslandNeckerMakumanamana
However, the island contains 33 stone shrines and stone artifacts much like those found in the main Hawaiian Islands.

Mauna Loa

MokuaweoweoLoaHawaiian volcano
Mauna Loa, taking up over half of the Big Island, is the largest shield volcano on the Earth.
The volcano's magma comes from the Hawaii hotspot, which has been responsible for the creation of the Hawaiian island chain over tens of millions of years.

Titus Coan

Most of the early earthquake monitoring took place in Hilo, by missionaries Titus Coan, Sarah J. Lyman and her family.
Titus Coan (February 1, 1801 – December 1, 1881) was an American minister from New England who spent most of his life as a Christian missionary to the Hawaiian Islands.

Honolulu

Honolulu, HawaiiHonolulu, HIHonolulu, Hawai'i
Several major roadways became impassable from rock slides, and effects were felt as far away as Honolulu, Oahu, nearly 150 mi from the epicenter.
The city has been the capital of the Hawaiian Islands since 1845 and gained historical recognition following the attack on Pearl Harbor by Japan near the city on December 7, 1941.

Molokai

MolokaʻiMoloka'iMoloka‘i
The island of Molokai had a catastrophic collapse or debris avalanche over a million years ago; this underwater landslide likely caused tsunamis.
Molokai (Hawaiian: ) anglicized as Molokai, nicknamed “The Friendly Isle”, is the fifth largest island of eight major islands that make up the Hawaiian Islands archipelago in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.