Hawaiian Pidgin

Hawaiian Creole EnglishHawaiian CreolePidginHawaiian Pidgin EnglishHawaii Creole EnglishHawaii Creole English languageHawaii PidginHawaiian 'PidginHawaiian EnglishHawaiʻi Pidgin
Hawaiian Pidgin English (alternately Hawaiian Creole English or HCE, known locally as Pidgin) is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi (L1: 600,000; L2: 400,000).wikipedia
136 Related Articles

Hawaiian language

HawaiianHawaiian forHawaii
Although English and Hawaiian are the co-official languages of the state of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiian Pidgin is spoken by many Hawaiʻi residents in everyday conversation and is often used in advertising targeted toward locals in Hawaiʻi. Hawaiian Pidgin has been influenced by many different languages, including Portuguese, Hawaiian, American English, and Cantonese.
A creole language spoken in Hawaii is Hawaiian Pidgin (or Hawaii Creole English, HCE).

Japanese loanwords in Hawaii

Japanese loanwords in Hawaiʻi
The article Japanese loanwords in Hawaiʻi lists some of those words originally from Japanese.
Many loanwords in Hawaiian Pidgin (or Hawaiian Creole English) derive from the Japanese language.

Native Hawaiians

Native HawaiianHawaiianHawaiians
Hawaiian Pidgin originated on sugarcane plantations as a form of communication used between English speaking residents and non-English speaking Native Hawaiians and foreign immigrants.
As with others local to Hawaii, native Hawaiians often speak Hawaiian Creole English (referred to in Hawai'i as Pidgin), a creole which developed during Hawaiʻi's plantation era in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with the influence of the various ethnic groups living in Hawaii during that time.

Sugar plantations in Hawaii

plantationplantations in Hawaiisugar plantations
Hawaiian Pidgin originated on sugarcane plantations as a form of communication used between English speaking residents and non-English speaking Native Hawaiians and foreign immigrants.
Known as Hawaiian Pidgin, this hybrid primarily of Hawaiian, English, Japanese, Chinese, and Portuguese allowed plantation workers to communicate effectively with one another and promoted a transfer of knowledge and traditions among the groups.

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
Although it is not completely mutually intelligible with Standard American English, Hawaiian Pidgin retains the highest degree of mutual intelligibility with it when compared with other English-based creoles, such as Jamaican Patois, in part due to its relatively recent emergence. Hawaiian Pidgin has been influenced by many different languages, including Portuguese, Hawaiian, American English, and Cantonese.
The island state of Hawaii, though primarily English-speaking, is also home to a creole language known commonly as Hawaiian Pidgin, and some Hawaii residents speak English with a Pidgin-influenced accent.

Lois-Ann Yamanaka

Lois Yamanaka
In recent years, writers from Hawaiʻi such as Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Joe Balaz, and Lee Tonouchi have written poems, short stories, and other works in Hawaiian Pidgin.
Many of her literary works are written in Hawaiian Pidgin, and some of her writing has dealt with controversial ethnic issues.

Da kine

Da kine is an expression in Hawaiian Pidgin (Hawaii Creole English), probably derived from "the kind", that usually functions grammatically as a placeholder name (compare to English "whatsit" and "whatchamacallit"), but can also take the role of a verb, adjective, or adverb.

Lee Tonouchi

In recent years, writers from Hawaiʻi such as Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Joe Balaz, and Lee Tonouchi have written poems, short stories, and other works in Hawaiian Pidgin.
Lee A. Tonouchi (born circa 1972) is a Hawaii born writer and editor, who calls himself "Da Pidgin Guerilla" because of his strong advocacy of the Hawaiian Pidgin language.

Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
It is also used in Hawaiian Creole English, presumably derived from Hawaiian.

Pidgin to Da Max

Two books, Pidgin to Da Max humorously portray pidgin through prose and illustrations.
Pidgin to Da Max (full title: Peppo's Pidgin to Da Max) is a humorous illustrated dictionary of Hawaiian Pidgin words and phrases by Douglas Simonson, Pat Sasaki, and Ken Sakata.

Going-to future

going-to'' futuregoing toabout to
Examples include Jamaican English Creole /de go hapm/ "is going to happen", /mi a go ɹon/ "I am going to run", Belizean Creole English /gwein/ or /gouɲ/, Gullah Uh gwine he'p dem "I'm going to help them", Hawaiian Creole English /Ai gon bai wan pickup/ "I gonna buy one pickup", /Da gai sed hi gon fiks mi ap wit wan blain deit/ "The guy said he gonna fix me up with one blind date", and Haitian Creole /Mwen va fini/ "I go finish".

Hawaii

State of HawaiiHawaiʻiHI
Hawaiian Pidgin English (alternately Hawaiian Creole English or HCE, known locally as Pidgin) is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi (L1: 600,000; L2: 400,000).
Hawaii Creole English, locally referred to as "Pidgin", is the native language of many native residents and is a second language for many others.

Kumu Kahua Theatre

Kumu KahuaKumu Kahua Theater
The most notable of these companies is Kumu Kahua Theater.
(Their motto, as seen on their T-shirts and Web site, is "Plays about life in Hawaii. Plays by Hawaii's playwrights. Plays for Hawaii's people.") Therefore, actors are often featured utilizing their natural local dialect or respective ethnic accent, and many plays have incorporated or are solely written in Hawaiian Creole English, an English dialect commonly known in the Hawaiian islands as pidgin.

Bible translations into Hawaiian

Bible translations into Hawaii PidginDa Jesus BookChristian Bible into Hawaiian
A Hawaiian Pidgin translation of the New Testament (called Da Jesus Book) has also been created, as has an adaptation of William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, or What You Will, titled in Hawaiian Pidgin "twelf nite o' WATEVA!"
There are both Hawaiian and Hawaii Pidgin Biblical translations for Hawaii.

English-based creole language

English CreoleEnglish-based creole languagesEnglish-based creole
Although it is not completely mutually intelligible with Standard American English, Hawaiian Pidgin retains the highest degree of mutual intelligibility with it when compared with other English-based creoles, such as Jamaican Patois, in part due to its relatively recent emergence.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Hawaiian Pidgin English (alternately Hawaiian Creole English or HCE, known locally as Pidgin) is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi (L1: 600,000; L2: 400,000).

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
Hawaiian Pidgin English (alternately Hawaiian Creole English or HCE, known locally as Pidgin) is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi (L1: 600,000; L2: 400,000).

Official language

official languagesofficialadministrative language
Although English and Hawaiian are the co-official languages of the state of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiian Pidgin is spoken by many Hawaiʻi residents in everyday conversation and is often used in advertising targeted toward locals in Hawaiʻi.

Nativization

nativizednative language
Despite its name, Hawaiian Pidgin is not a pidgin, but rather a full-fledged, nativized, and demographically stable creole language.

Jamaican Patois

Jamaican CreolePatoisJamaican
Although it is not completely mutually intelligible with Standard American English, Hawaiian Pidgin retains the highest degree of mutual intelligibility with it when compared with other English-based creoles, such as Jamaican Patois, in part due to its relatively recent emergence.

Sugarcane

sugar canesugarsugar-cane
Hawaiian Pidgin originated on sugarcane plantations as a form of communication used between English speaking residents and non-English speaking Native Hawaiians and foreign immigrants.

Lingua franca

trade languagecommon languagelingua francas
Because such sugarcane plantations often hired workers from many different countries, a common language was needed in order for the plantation workers to communicate effectively with each other and their supervisors.

Portuguese language

PortuguesePortuguese-languageBrazilian Portuguese
Hawaiian Pidgin has been influenced by many different languages, including Portuguese, Hawaiian, American English, and Cantonese.

Cantonese

Cantonese languageCantonese ChineseStandard Cantonese
Hawaiian Pidgin has been influenced by many different languages, including Portuguese, Hawaiian, American English, and Cantonese.

Japanese diaspora

NikkeiJapaneseJapanese immigrants
As people of other language backgrounds were brought in to work on the plantations, such as Japanese, Filipinos, and Koreans, Hawaiian Pidgin acquired words from these languages.