Haystack Observatory

Millstone Hill ObservatoryHaystackHaystack RadarHaystack radar antennaHaystack Ultrawideband Satellite Imaging RadarHaystack X-bandHaystack X-Band RadarMillstone HillMillstone Hill RadarMIT observatory
Haystack Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).wikipedia
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Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Haystack Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
The Institute also encompasses a number of major off-campus facilities such as the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the Bates Center, and the Haystack Observatory, as well as affiliated laboratories such as the Broad and Whitehead Institutes.

MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Lincoln LaboratoryLincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test SiteLincoln Lab's ETS
Haystack was initially built by MIT's Lincoln Laboratory for the United States Air Force and was known as Haystack Microwave Research Facility.
The site comprises three major radars – Millstone Deep-Space Tracking Radar (an L-band radar), Haystack Long-Range Imaging Radar (W-band and X-band), and the Haystack Auxiliary Radar (Ku-band).

Haystack Catena

Haystack Vallis
Haystack Vallis on Mercury is named after this observatory.
It was named after Haystack Observatory.

Space debris

orbital debrisspace junkdebris
It was constructed in 1993 to augment the LSSC imaging and data collections space debris.
Other data come from the ESA Space Debris Telescope, TIRA, the Goldstone, Haystack, and EISCAT radars and the Cobra Dane phased array radar, to be used in debris-environment models like the ESA Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference (MASTER).

Millstone Hill

Millstone Hill Steerable Antenna
The Millstone Hill Steerable Antenna (MISA) is a 46 m fully steerable UHF antenna.
It is currently located at MIT Haystack Observatory in Westford, Massachusetts.

United States Space Surveillance Network

GEODSSSpace Surveillance NetworkGround-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance
The system contributes data to the United States Space Surveillance Network (SSN).

Knowing (film)

KnowingKnowing'' (film)
He rushes to the MIT observatory and learns that a massive solar flare will hit the Earth on the last date indicated by the message.

Incoherent scatter

incoherent scatteringIncoherent scatter radarincoherently
Millstone Hill is the location for two of the most well-known incoherent scatter radars in the world.

Ionosphere

ionosphericD layerionospheric physics
These radars are capable of measuring a vast array of ionospheric components, including temperature, ion concentrations and solar wind data.

Observatory

astronomical observatoryobservatoriesastronomical observatories
Haystack Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Westford, Massachusetts

WestfordWestford, MAtown of Westford
It is located in Westford, Massachusetts (US), approximately 45 km northwest of Boston.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
It is located in Westford, Massachusetts (US), approximately 45 km northwest of Boston.

United States Air Force

U.S. Air ForceAir ForceUSAF
Haystack was initially built by MIT's Lincoln Laboratory for the United States Air Force and was known as Haystack Microwave Research Facility.

Mercury (planet)

MercuryMercurioplanet Mercury
Haystack Vallis on Mercury is named after this observatory.

Radome

rotodomeradar domeradomes
The 37 m Haystack Radio Telescope is a parabolic antenna protected by a 46 m metal-frame radome.

Radio spectrum

bandradio bandspectrum
It was completed in 1964 and originally observed at 8 GHz on the radio spectrum.

Radar

radar stationradarsradar system
When used for radar it broadcasts and listens in bands at either 10 GHz or 95 GHz.

Cassegrain reflector

CassegrainCassegrain telescopeCassegrain focus
The secondary reflector of the Cassegrain design features an active surface.

Imaging radar

radar imagingradar imageryimaging
The Long-Range Imaging Radar (LRIR) system was originally designed to function as an X-band long-range imaging radar.

Satellite

satellitesartificial satelliteartificial satellites
The system was capable of sensitivity of 25 cm resolution, allowing for tracking and imaging satellites out to geostationary orbit distances, as well as deep space objects out to 40000 km range.

Geostationary orbit

GeostationaryGEOgeostationary satellite
The system was capable of sensitivity of 25 cm resolution, allowing for tracking and imaging satellites out to geostationary orbit distances, as well as deep space objects out to 40000 km range.

X band

X-bandXX-band radar
The Long-Range Imaging Radar (LRIR) system was originally designed to function as an X-band long-range imaging radar. The system is capable of simultaneous operations in X band and W-band, which allows it to better determine the size, shape, orientation, and motion of orbiting objects.

W band

WW-band
The system is capable of simultaneous operations in X band and W-band, which allows it to better determine the size, shape, orientation, and motion of orbiting objects.