Heaven in Christianity

HeavenChristian heavenHeaven (Christianity)Christian idea of HeavenheavenlyafterlifeCatholic heavenheavenly contextsheavenly placesinexpressible joys
In Christianity, heaven is traditionally the location of the throne of God as well as the holy angels.wikipedia
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Throne of God

throneThrone of GloryGod's throne
In Christianity, heaven is traditionally the location of the throne of God as well as the holy angels.
Including Heaven as the Throne of God, The Throne of David, The Throne of Glory, The Throne of Grace and many more.

Acts of the Apostles

ActsBook of ActsActs of Apostles
In the Book of Acts, the resurrected Jesus ascends to heaven where, as the Nicene Creed states, he now sits at the right hand of God and will return to Earth in the Second Coming.
Acts continues the story of Christianity in the 1st century, beginning with Jesus's ascension to Heaven.

Second Coming

Second Coming of ChristSecond Adventreturn of Christ
In the Book of Acts, the resurrected Jesus ascends to heaven where, as the Nicene Creed states, he now sits at the right hand of God and will return to Earth in the Second Coming. The earliest of the Apostolic Fathers, Clement of Rome, does not mention entry into Heaven after death but instead expresses belief in the resurrection of the dead after a period of "slumber" at the Second Coming.
The Second Coming (sometimes called the Second Advent or the Parousia) is a Christian and Islamic belief regarding the future (or past) return of Jesus after his ascension to heaven about two thousand years ago.

Session of Christ

exaltationExaltation of Christexaltation of Jesus
In the Book of Acts, the resurrected Jesus ascends to heaven where, as the Nicene Creed states, he now sits at the right hand of God and will return to Earth in the Second Coming.
The Christian doctrine of the Session of Christ or heavenly session says that Jesus Christ is seated at the right hand of God the Father in Heaven—the word "session" is an archaic noun meaning "sitting".

Right hand of God

at the right handFather's right handGod's right hand
In the Book of Acts, the resurrected Jesus ascends to heaven where, as the Nicene Creed states, he now sits at the right hand of God and will return to Earth in the Second Coming.
It is also a placement next to God in Heaven, in the traditional place of honor, mentioned in the New Testament as the place of Christ at Mark 16:19, Luke 22:69, Matthew 22:44 and 26:64, Acts 2:34 and 7:55, 1 Peter 3:22 and elsewhere.

Assumption of Mary

AssumptionAssumption of the Virgin MaryFeast of the Assumption
According to Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox teaching, Mary, the mother of Jesus, is also said to have been assumed into heaven and is titled the Queen of Heaven.
The Assumption of Mary into Heaven (often shortened to the Assumption) is, according to the beliefs of the Catholic Church, Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, the bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into Heaven at the end of her earthly life.

Queen of Heaven

Queenship of MaryMary, Queen of HeavenQueen of the World
According to Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox teaching, Mary, the mother of Jesus, is also said to have been assumed into heaven and is titled the Queen of Heaven.
It states that Mary is called Queen of Heaven because her son, Jesus Christ, is the king of Israel and heavenly king of the universe; indeed, the Davidic tradition of Israel recognized the mother of the king as the Queen Mother of Israel.

Christian eschatology

eschatologyeschatologicalChristian eschatological
In the Christian Bible, concepts about the future "Kingdom of Heaven" are professed in several scriptural prophecies of the new (or renewed) Earth said to follow the resurrection of the dead—particularly the books of Isaiah and Revelation and other sources of Christian eschatology.
Christian eschatology looks to study and discuss matters such as death and the afterlife, Heaven and Hell, the second coming of Jesus, the resurrection of the dead, the rapture, the tribulation, millennialism, the end of the world, the Last Judgment, and the New Heaven and New Earth in the world to come.

Intermediate state

intermediatebeforecondition and prospects for the dead
The earliest of the Apostolic Fathers, Clement of Rome, does not mention entry into Heaven after death but instead expresses belief in the resurrection of the dead after a period of "slumber" at the Second Coming.
The Eastern Church admits of such an intermediate state, but refrained from defining it, so as not to blur the distinction between the alternative definitive fates of Heaven and Hell.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
According to Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox teaching, Mary, the mother of Jesus, is also said to have been assumed into heaven and is titled the Queen of Heaven.

Nicene Creed

NiceneNicene-Constantinopolitan CreedCreed
In the Book of Acts, the resurrected Jesus ascends to heaven where, as the Nicene Creed states, he now sits at the right hand of God and will return to Earth in the Second Coming.

Kingdom of heaven (Gospel of Matthew)

Kingdom of Heaven the Kingdom of Heaven in the Gospel of MatthewHeaven
In the Christian Bible, concepts about the future "Kingdom of Heaven" are professed in several scriptural prophecies of the new (or renewed) Earth said to follow the resurrection of the dead—particularly the books of Isaiah and Revelation and other sources of Christian eschatology.
That Matthew uses the word "heaven" is often seen as a reflection of the sensibilities of the Jewish audience this gospel was directed to, and thus tried to avoid the word "God."

Mary, mother of Jesus

Virgin MaryMaryBlessed Virgin Mary
According to Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox teaching, Mary, the mother of Jesus, is also said to have been assumed into heaven and is titled the Queen of Heaven.
According to Catholic and Orthodox teachings, at the end of her earthly life her body was raised directly into Heaven; this is known in the Christian West as the Assumption.

Angel

angelsAll Angelsangelic
In Christianity, heaven is traditionally the location of the throne of God as well as the holy angels.
Four- and six-winged angels, drawn from the higher grades of angels (especially cherubim and seraphim) and often showing only their faces and wings, are derived from Persian art and are usually shown only in heavenly contexts, as opposed to performing tasks on earth.

Beatific vision

Heavena supernatural union with Godbeatific vision controversy
In heaven one experiences the beatific vision.
A person possessing the beatific vision reaches, as a member of redeemed humanity in the communion of saints, perfect salvation in its entirety, i.e. heaven.

Purgatory

purgatorialpurgationForsaken Soul
Those Christians who die still imperfectly purified must, according to Catholic teaching, pass through a state of purification known as purgatory before entering heaven.
The Catholic Church holds that "all who die in God's grace and friendship but still imperfectly purified" undergo the process of purification which the Church calls purgatory, "so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven".

Last Judgment

Last JudgementJudgment DayDay of Judgment
Some denominations teach that one enters heaven at the moment of death, while others teach that this occurs at a later time (the Last Judgment). In the first, the soul does not enter heaven until the last judgement or the "end of time" when it (along with the body) is resurrected and judged.
Anglican and Methodist theology holds that at the time of the Last Day, "Jesus will return and that He will 'judge both the quick and the dead'," and "all [will] be bodily resurrected and stand before Christ as our Judge. After the Judgment, the Righteous will go to their eternal reward in Heaven and the Accursed will depart to Hell (see )."

Soul

soulsspirithuman soul
In the first, the soul does not enter heaven until the last judgement or the "end of time" when it (along with the body) is resurrected and judged.
According to a common Christian eschatology, when people die, their souls will be judged by God and determined to go to Heaven or to Hell.

Kingship and kingdom of God

Kingdom of GodKingdom of HeavenGod's Kingdom
According to some views, some Christians in the 1st century believed that the Kingdom of God was coming to Earth within their own lifetimes and looked forward to a divine future on Earth.
Among these are Heaven as the Throne of God, The Throne of David, The Throne of Glory, The Throne of Grace and many more.

Paradise

paradisicalparadisalparadisiacal
He referred to the first as just "heaven", the second as "paradise", and the third as "the city".
In the 2nd century AD, Irenaeus distinguished paradise from heaven.

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
At his death on the Cross, the Orthodox believe Jesus opened the door to Paradise to mankind again, and the Good Thief was the first to enter.
Christians believe that through faith in Jesus' substitutionary death (among other interpretive theories see below) and triumphant resurrection people are reunited with God and receive new joy and power in this life as well as eternal life in heaven after the body's death.

New Jerusalem

Heavenly JerusalemCity of GodCelestial city
Revelation describes a New Jerusalem which comes from Heaven to the New Earth, which is seen to be a symbolic reference to the people of God living in community with one another.
As such, the New Jerusalem is a conception of Heaven, see also Heaven (Christianity).

Resurrection of the dead

resurrectionresurrection of the bodyresurrected
In the Christian Bible, concepts about the future "Kingdom of Heaven" are professed in several scriptural prophecies of the new (or renewed) Earth said to follow the resurrection of the dead—particularly the books of Isaiah and Revelation and other sources of Christian eschatology. The earliest of the Apostolic Fathers, Clement of Rome, does not mention entry into Heaven after death but instead expresses belief in the resurrection of the dead after a period of "slumber" at the Second Coming. In most forms of Christianity, Heaven is also understood as the abode for the righteous dead in the afterlife, usually a temporary stage before the resurrection of the dead and the saints' return to the New Earth.
Currently, however, it is a popular Christian belief that the souls of the righteous go to Heaven.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
In Christianity, heaven is traditionally the location of the throne of God as well as the holy angels.

Afterlife

life after deathhereafterafter death
In traditional Christianity, it is considered to be a physical place in the afterlife.