Heel

heelsRudoHiel
The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot.wikipedia
130 Related Articles

Calcaneus

calcaneumheel bonesustentaculum tali
It is based on the projection of one bone, the calcaneus or heel bone, behind the articulation of the bones of the lower leg. The lateral rays stretch over the cuboid bone to the heel bone and the medial rays over the three cuneiform bones and the navicular bone to the ankle bone.
In humans, the calcaneus (from the Latin calcaneus or calcaneum, meaning heel ) or heel bone is a bone of the tarsus of the foot which constitutes the heel.

Sole (foot)

solesolessole of the foot
To distribute the compressive forces exerted on the heel during gait, and especially the stance phase when the heel contacts the ground, the sole of the foot is covered by a layer of subcutaneous connective tissue up to 2 cm thick (under the heel).
The subcutaneous tissue in the sole has adapted to deal with the high local compressive forces on the heel and the ball (between the toes and the arch) by developing a system of "pressure chambers."

Soleus muscle

soleus
The Achilles tendon is the muscle tendon of the triceps surae, a "three-headed" group of muscles—the soleus and the two heads of the gastrocnemius.
It runs from just below the knee to the heel, and is involved in standing and walking.

Foot

feetinstepft
The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot.
An individual who neutrally pronates initially strikes the ground on the lateral side of the heel.

Human leg

leglegslower limb
It is based on the projection of one bone, the calcaneus or heel bone, behind the articulation of the bones of the lower leg.

Anatomical terms of motion

flexionextensionabduction
The main function of the triceps surae is plantar flexion, i.e. to stretch the foot downward.
For example, when walking on the heels the ankle is described as being in dorsiflexion.

Achilles tendon

AchillesAchilles' tendoncalcaneal tendon
The Achilles tendon is the muscle tendon of the triceps surae, a "three-headed" group of muscles—the soleus and the two heads of the gastrocnemius.
Symptoms include the sudden onset of sharp pain in the heel.

Plantigrade

plantigrade locomotionsemiplantigradeflat-footed
In plantigrade species it rests on the ground.
The other options are digitigrade, walking on the toes with the heel and wrist permanently raised, and unguligrade, walking on the nail or nails of the toes (the hoof) with the heel/wrist and the digits permanently raised.

Achilles' heel

Achilles heelAchillesAchilles’ heel
To prevent his death, his mother Thetis took Achilles to the River Styx, which was supposed to offer powers of invulnerability, and dipped his body into the water; however, as Thetis held Achilles by the heel, his heel was not washed over by the water of the magical river.

Plantar fasciitis

plantar fascia injuryDancer's heelHeel spur syndrome
It results in pain in the heel and bottom of the foot that is usually most severe with the first steps of the day or following a period of rest.

Hock (anatomy)

hockhockscalcaneum
In the long-footed mammals, both the hoofed species (unguligrade) and the clawed forms which walk on the toes (digitigrade), the heel is well above the ground at the apex of the angular joint known as the hock.

Gait

gallopleaping gaitsaction
To distribute the compressive forces exerted on the heel during gait, and especially the stance phase when the heel contacts the ground, the sole of the foot is covered by a layer of subcutaneous connective tissue up to 2 cm thick (under the heel).

Collagen

procollagencollagenscollagen fibers
Each of these chambers contains fibrofatty tissue covered by a layer of tough connective tissue made of collagen fibers.

Septum

septaseptateseptal
These septa ("walls") are firmly attached both to the plantar aponeurosis above and the sole's skin below.

Plantar fascia

plantar aponeurosisplantar aponeuroses
These septa ("walls") are firmly attached both to the plantar aponeurosis above and the sole's skin below.

Dermis

dermaldermal papillaepapillary dermis
These septa ("walls") are firmly attached both to the plantar aponeurosis above and the sole's skin below.

Triceps surae muscle

calf muscletriceps suraecalf
The Achilles tendon is the muscle tendon of the triceps surae, a "three-headed" group of muscles—the soleus and the two heads of the gastrocnemius.

Gastrocnemius muscle

gastrocnemiusCalvescalf
The Achilles tendon is the muscle tendon of the triceps surae, a "three-headed" group of muscles—the soleus and the two heads of the gastrocnemius.

Plantaris muscle

plantaris
It is accompanied by a "fourth head", the slight plantaris muscle, the long slender tendon of which is also attached to the heel bone but not visible.

Cuboid bone

cuboid
The lateral rays stretch over the cuboid bone to the heel bone and the medial rays over the three cuneiform bones and the navicular bone to the ankle bone.

Navicular bone

navicularboat-likenavicula
The lateral rays stretch over the cuboid bone to the heel bone and the medial rays over the three cuneiform bones and the navicular bone to the ankle bone.

Talus bone

astragalustalusankle bone
The lateral rays stretch over the cuboid bone to the heel bone and the medial rays over the three cuneiform bones and the navicular bone to the ankle bone.

Arches of the foot

archarch of the footarches
Because the ankle bone is placed over the heel bone, these rays are adjacent near the toes but overriding near the heel, and together they form the arches of the foot that are optimized to distributed compressive forces across an uneven terrain.

Ball (foot)

ballball of the footballs
In this context the heel thus forms the posterior point of support that together with the balls of the large and little toes bear the brunt of the loads.

Infection

infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfections
Cracked heels is a common health problem and it may cause infections.