Heinz Kohut

Kohut
Heinz Kohut (3 May 1913 – 8 October 1981) was an Austrian-American psychoanalyst best known for his development of self psychology, an influential school of thought within psychodynamic/psychoanalytic theory which helped transform the modern practice of analytic and dynamic treatment approaches.wikipedia
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Self psychology

self-psychologyempathic failuresSelf psychologist
Heinz Kohut (3 May 1913 – 8 October 1981) was an Austrian-American psychoanalyst best known for his development of self psychology, an influential school of thought within psychodynamic/psychoanalytic theory which helped transform the modern practice of analytic and dynamic treatment approaches.
Self psychology, a modern psychoanalytic theory and its clinical applications, was conceived by Heinz Kohut in Chicago in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, and is still developing as a contemporary form of psychoanalytic treatment.

Psychoanalysis

psychoanalystpsychoanalyticpsychoanalytical
Heinz Kohut (3 May 1913 – 8 October 1981) was an Austrian-American psychoanalyst best known for his development of self psychology, an influential school of thought within psychodynamic/psychoanalytic theory which helped transform the modern practice of analytic and dynamic treatment approaches. Early in 1938 Kohut began a psychoanalysis with August Aichhorn, a close friend of Sigmund Freud.
Self psychology was proposed originally by Heinz Kohut, and has been further developed by Arnold Goldberg, Frank Lachmann, Paul and Anna Ornstein, Marian Tolpin, and others.

August Aichhorn

Early in 1938 Kohut began a psychoanalysis with August Aichhorn, a close friend of Sigmund Freud.
Heinz Kohut said of him: “He knew every shade of dialect, every nuance of local habits, depending on regional and class differences.

Narcissistic personality disorder

megalomanianarcissisticmegalomaniac
If a person is narcissistic, it will allow him to suppress feelings of low self-esteem.
The narcissistic personality was first described by the psychoanalyst Robert Waelder, in 1925; and the term narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) was coined by Heinz Kohut, in 1968.

Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis

Chicago Psychoanalytic Institutethe Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis
Kohut became a prominent member of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.
Notable psychoanalysts that have been associated with the institute include Karl Menninger, Karen Horney, Thomas Szasz, Therese Benedek, Hedda Bolgar, Roy Grinker, Maxwell Gitelson, Louis Shapiro, Heinz Kohut, Arnold Goldberg, Jerome Kavka, Frank Summers, and Michael Franz Basch.

Narcissism

narcissisticnarcissistnarcissists
Kohut demonstrated his interest in how we develop our "sense of self" using narcissism as a model.
The term narcissistic rage was coined by Heinz Kohut in 1972.

Mirroring (psychology)

mirroringmirrormirrored
They also need to have their self-worth reflected back ("mirrored" Note : This term isn't a synonym of "mirroring") by empathic and caregiving others.
According to Kohut's theories of self-psychology, individuals need a sense of validation and belonging in order to establish their concepts of self.

Empathy

empathicempathempathetic
They also need to have their self-worth reflected back ("mirrored" Note : This term isn't a synonym of "mirroring") by empathic and caregiving others.
Heinz Kohut is the main introducer of the principle of empathy in psychoanalysis.

Psychodynamics

psychodynamicpsychodynamic theorydynamic psychology
Heinz Kohut (3 May 1913 – 8 October 1981) was an Austrian-American psychoanalyst best known for his development of self psychology, an influential school of thought within psychodynamic/psychoanalytic theory which helped transform the modern practice of analytic and dynamic treatment approaches.

Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienViennese
Kohut was born on 3 May 1913, in Vienna, Austria-Hungary, to Felix Kohut and Else Kohut (née Lampl).

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
Kohut was born on 3 May 1913, in Vienna, Austria-Hungary, to Felix Kohut and Else Kohut (née Lampl).

Jewish assimilation

assimilationassimilatedassimilated Jew
Kohut's parents were assimilated Jews living in Alsergrund, or the Ninth District, and they had married two years previously.

Alsergrund

RoßauRossau9th District
Kohut's parents were assimilated Jews living in Alsergrund, or the Ninth District, and they had married two years previously.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
His father was an aspiring concert pianist whose musical ambitions were hindered by the traumas he endured in World War I, and Felix moved into business with a man named Paul Bellak.

Enmeshment

enmeshedenmeshing
Else's relationship with her son can be described as "narcissistic enmeshment".

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Special care was taken that he learned French.

Grinzing

Grinzing Cemetery
From 1924 on he attended the Döblinger Gymnasium in Grinzing or the 19th District, where the Kohuts would build a house.

Opera

opera singeroperasoperatic
During his time at the school he had one more tutor, but the role of this person was to engage him in educational discussions, to take him to museums, galleries, and the opera.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
At school a special emphasis was given to the Greek and Latin languages and Greek and Roman literature.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
At school a special emphasis was given to the Greek and Latin languages and Greek and Roman literature.

Ancient Greek literature

GreekAncient GreekGreek literature
At school a special emphasis was given to the Greek and Latin languages and Greek and Roman literature.

Latin literature

LatinRoman literatureliterature
At school a special emphasis was given to the Greek and Latin languages and Greek and Roman literature.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

GoetheJohann Wolfgang GoetheJohann von Goethe
Kohut also came to appreciate Goethe, Thomas Mann and Robert Musil.

Thomas Mann

MannThomasMann, Thomas
Kohut also came to appreciate Goethe, Thomas Mann and Robert Musil.

Robert Musil

MusilMusil, RobertRoberta Musila
Kohut also came to appreciate Goethe, Thomas Mann and Robert Musil.