Helen Wills

Helen Wills MoodyHelen MoodyHelen Wills-MoodyWills MoodyHelen (Wills) MoodyHelen Wills RoarkeWills Moody Roark, Helen
Helen Newington Wills (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody and Helen Wills Roark, was an American tennis player.wikipedia
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Martina Navratilova

Martina NavrátilováNavratilovaNavratilova, Martina
Her record of eight wins at Wimbledon was not surpassed until 1990 when Martina Navratilova won nine.
She reached the Wimbledon singles final 12 times, including for nine consecutive years from 1982 through 1990, and won the women's singles title at Wimbledon a record nine times (surpassing Helen Wills Moody's eight Wimbledon titles), including a run of six consecutive titles, widely regarded as the best performance by any professional player at a major event.

The Championships, Wimbledon

WimbledonWimbledon ChampionshipsWimbledon Tennis Championships
Her record of eight wins at Wimbledon was not surpassed until 1990 when Martina Navratilova won nine.
1 were René Lacoste and Helen Wills.

Grand Slam (tennis)

Grand SlamGrand Slamscareer Grand Slam
She won 31 Grand Slam tournament titles (singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles) during her career, including 19 singles titles.
Helen Wills Moody won all 16 of the Grand Slam singles tournaments she played beginning with the 1924 U.S. Championships and extending to the 1933 Wimbledon Championships (not counting her defaults in the 1926 French and Wimbledon Championships).

Suzanne Lenglen

Coupe Suzanne LenglenLenglen, SuzanneSuzanne Rachel Flore Lenglen
On February 16, 1926, the 20-year-old Wills met Suzanne Lenglen, six-time Wimbledon champion, in the final of a tournament at the Carlton Club in Cannes in the Match of the Century.
One of Lenglen's highest-profile matches towards the end of her career was her victory over Helen Wills in the Match of the Century, their only career meeting.

Elizabeth Ryan

Ryan, Elizabeth
Apart from those two losses, beginning with the 1923 U.S. Championships, Wills lost only four matches in three years: once to Lenglen, twice to Kathleen McKane Godfree, and once to Elizabeth Ryan.
Ryan had to play Dorothea Lambert Chambers in the all-comers final of 1920; Suzanne Lenglen in the 1919 semifinals (losing 6–4, 7–5), 1921 final, 1922 quarterfinals, 1924 quarterfinals (losing 6–2, 6–8, 6–4), and 1925 second round; and Helen Wills Moody in the 1928 semifinals and 1930 final.

Match of the Century (tennis)

Match of the Century
On February 16, 1926, the 20-year-old Wills met Suzanne Lenglen, six-time Wimbledon champion, in the final of a tournament at the Carlton Club in Cannes in the Match of the Century.
The Match of the Century was a tennis match in 1926 known for being the only career meeting between Suzanne Lenglen and Helen Wills, the two preeminent female tennis players of the 1920s.

Helen Jacobs

Helen Hull JacobsHull Jacobs, HelenJacobs
Her streak of winning U.S. Championships seven times in seven attempts ended when she defaulted to Helen Hull Jacobs during the 1933 final due to a back injury, trailing 0–3 in the third set.
Like both her Wightman Cup coach Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman and her archrival Helen Wills Moody, she grew up in Berkeley, California, learned the game at the Berkeley Tennis Club, pursued her undergraduate degree at the University of California, Berkeley and was inducted into the Cal Sports Hall of Fame.

1935 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

1935QF2R
After taking more than a year off to recuperate, Wills returned to tennis in June 1935 and the following month won her seventh Wimbledon title, surviving a match point at 2–5 in the final set against Jacobs.
Helen Moody defeated Helen Jacobs in the final, 6–3, 3–6, 7–5 to win the Ladies' Singles tennis title at the 1935 Wimbledon Championships.

Associated Press Athlete of the Year

Associated Press Male Athlete of the YearAssociated Press Female Athlete of the YearAP Athlete of the Year
In 1935, she was named Female Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press.

Jack Kramer

KramerJake KramerKramer, John Albert "Jack
She was said to be "arguably the most dominant tennis player of the 20th century", and has been called by some (including Jack Kramer, Harry Hopman, Mercer Beasley, Don Budge, and AP News) the greatest female player in history.
In his 1979 autobiography, The Game: My 40 Years in Tennis, Kramer calls Helen Wills Moody the best women's tennis player that he ever saw.

1933 Wimbledon Championships

1933WimbledonWimbledon Championships
In 1927, a revived Wills began her streak of not losing a set until the 1933 Wimbledon Championships.
Jack Crawford and Helen Moody won the singles titles.

Tennis at the 1924 Summer Olympics – Women's doubles

DoublesWomen's doubles1924
Wills also won two Olympic gold medals in Paris in 1924 (singles and doubles), the last year that tennis was an Olympic sport until 1988.

Tennis at the 1924 Summer Olympics – Women's singles

Women's singlesSingles1924
Wills also won two Olympic gold medals in Paris in 1924 (singles and doubles), the last year that tennis was an Olympic sport until 1988.

Tennis

tennis playerlawn tennisTennis, Boys
Helen Newington Wills (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody and Helen Wills Roark, was an American tennis player.

1927 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

1927QF2R
First-seeded Helen Wills defeated Lilí de Álvarez 6–2, 6–4 to win the Ladies' Singles tennis title at the 1927 Wimbledon Championships.

1928 French Championships – Women's Singles

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First-seeded Helen Wills defeated Eileen Bennett 6–1, 6–2 in the final to win the Women's Singles tennis title at the 1928 French Championships.

Eileen Bennett Whittingstall

Eileen BennettEileen Fearnley-WhittingstallBennett
She lost both of these finals in straight sets to Helen Wills Moody.

Betty Nuthall

Betty Nuthall ShoemakerNuthallNuthall Shoemaker, Betty
Nuthall lost the final to Helen Wills in straight sets while serving under-handed.

1928 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

19281RQF
Helen Wills successfully defended her title, defeating Lilí de Álvarez in the final, 6–2, 6–3 to win the Ladies' Singles tennis title at the 1928 Wimbledon Championships.

Molla Mallory

Molla Bjurstedt MalloryMolla BjurstedtBjurstedt Mallory, Molla
Her farewell to the U.S. Championships was as a 45-year-old semifinalist in 1929, losing to Helen Wills Moody 6–0, 6–0 after having defeated the first foreign seeded player Betty Nuthall in the quarterfinal.

Simonne Mathieu

Simone MathieuMathieuMathieu, Simonne
In those finals, she lost three times to Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling, twice to Helen Wills Moody, and once to Margaret Scriven-Vivian.

1929 French Championships – Women's Singles

19291929 French ChampionshipsQF
Helen Wills defeated Simonne Mathieu 6–3, 6–4 in the final to win the Women's Singles tennis title at the 1929 French Championships.

1929 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

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Helen Wills successfully defended her title, defeating Helen Jacobs in the final, 6–1, 6–2 to win the Ladies' Singles tennis title at the 1929 Wimbledon Championships.

Phoebe Holcroft Watson

Phoebe WatsonPhoebe HolcroftMrs. Holcroft Watson
Phoebe Catherine Holcroft Watson (née Holcroft; 7 October 1898 – 20 October 1980) was a tennis player from the United Kingdom whose best result in singles was reaching the final of the U.S. Championships in 1929, losing to Helen Wills in straight sets.

Lilí Álvarez

Lilí de ÁlvarezLili de AlvarezLilly De Alvarez
According to American Helen Wills Moody, who defeated Álvarez twice in Wimbledon singles finals, Álvarez' game was an "unusually daring one".