Helen of Troy

HelenHelen of SpartaHelenaElena di TroiaElineieponymous characterGolden HelenHelen (of Troy)Helen of Sparta, also known as Helen of TroyHelen of Troy was born
In Greek mythology, Helen of Troy (Ancient Greek: Ἑλένη Helénē, ), also known as Helen of Sparta, was said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world.wikipedia
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Menelaus

MenelaosKing MenelausMenalaus
She was married to King Menelaus of Sparta but was abducted by Prince Paris of Troy after the goddess Aphrodite promised her to him in the Judgement of Paris.
In Greek mythology, Menelaus (, Menelaos, from μένος "vigor, rage, power" and λαός "people," "wrath of the people") was a king of Mycenaean (pre-Dorian) Sparta, the husband of Helen of Troy, and the son of Atreus and Aerope.

Trojan War

Fall of TroySiege of TroyTroy
This resulted in the Trojan War when the Achaeans set out to reclaim her.
In Greek mythology, the Trojan War (Τρωικός Πόλεμος; Truva Savaşı) was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.

Paris (mythology)

ParisParis of TroyAlexander
She was married to King Menelaus of Sparta but was abducted by Prince Paris of Troy after the goddess Aphrodite promised her to him in the Judgement of Paris.
Of these appearances, probably the best known was the elopement with Helen, queen of Sparta, this being one of the immediate causes of the Trojan War.

Clytemnestra

ClytaemnestraKlytemnestraClytemnestre
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra. In most sources, Iphigenia is the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, but Duris of Samos and other writers followed Stesichorus' account.
Clytemnestra (, Klytaimnḗstra, ), in Greek mythology, was the wife of Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, and the sister of Helen of Troy.

Zeus

JupiterCronidesZeus Chrysaoreus
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra.
These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.

Iliad

The IliadIlliadIlias
Elements of her putative biography come from classical authors such as Aristophanes, Cicero, Euripides, and Homer (in both the Iliad and the Odyssey).
While Helen tells Priam about the Greek commanders from the walls of Troy, both sides swear a truce and promise to abide by the outcome of the duel.

Castor and Pollux

DioscuriCastorPollux
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra. More recently, Otto Skutsch has advanced the theory that the name Helen might have two separate etymologies, which belong to different mythological figures respectively, namely *Sṷelenā (related to Sanskrit svaraṇā "the shining one") and *Selenā, the first a Spartan goddess, connected to one or the other natural light phenomenon (especially St. Elmo's fire) and sister of the Dioscuri, the other a vegetation goddess worshiped in Therapne as Ἑλένα Δενδρῖτις ("Helena of the Trees").
Though accounts of their birth are varied, they are sometimes said to have been born from an egg, along with their twin sisters Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra.

Philonoe

PhylonoePhilomela
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra.

Judgement of Paris

Judgment of ParisThe Judgement of Pariswhose feud
She was married to King Menelaus of Sparta but was abducted by Prince Paris of Troy after the goddess Aphrodite promised her to him in the Judgement of Paris.
This was Helen of Sparta, wife of the Greek king Menelaus.

St. Elmo's fire

St Elmo's FireSaint Elmo's Firechain-fire
More recently, Otto Skutsch has advanced the theory that the name Helen might have two separate etymologies, which belong to different mythological figures respectively, namely *Sṷelenā (related to Sanskrit svaraṇā "the shining one") and *Selenā, the first a Spartan goddess, connected to one or the other natural light phenomenon (especially St. Elmo's fire) and sister of the Dioscuri, the other a vegetation goddess worshiped in Therapne as Ἑλένα Δενδρῖτις ("Helena of the Trees").

Helen (play)

HelenHelen'' (play)Helena
Euripides' play Helen, written in the late 5th century BC, is the earliest source to report the most familiar account of Helen's birth: that, although her putative father was Tyndareus, she was actually Zeus' daughter. In the version put forth by Euripides in his play Helen, Hera fashioned a likeness of Helen (eidolon, εἴδωλον) out of clouds at Zeus' request, Hermes took her to Egypt, and Helen never went to Troy instead spending the entire war in Egypt.
Helen (, Helenē) is a drama by Euripides about Helen, first produced in 412 BC for the Dionysia in a trilogy that also contained Euripides' lost Andromeda.

Leda (mythology)

LedaLédaborn from an egg
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra.
She married king Tyndareus of Sparta and by him became the mother of Helen of Troy, Clytemnestra, and Castor and Pollux (also spelled "Castor and Polydeuces").

Tyndareus

TyndareosTyndaridsTyndarus
An oath sworn by all the suitors (known as the Oath of Tyndareus) required all of them to provide military assistance to the winning suitor, whomever he might be, if she were ever stolen from him; the obligations of the oath precipitated the Trojan War.
He married the Aetolian princess, Leda by whom he became the father of Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe, and the stepfather of Helen of Troy and Pollux.

Timandra (mythology)

TimandraTimandre
She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra, Castor and Polydeuces, Philonoe, Phoebe and Timandra.
Thus, she was the (half-)sister of the divine twins, Castor and Pollux, Helen, Clytemnestra, Phoebe and Philonoe.

Stesichorus

StesichorosSteischorusStes
On the other hand, Stesichorus said that Iphigenia was the daughter of Theseus and Helen, which obviously implies that Helen was of childbearing age.
He is best known for telling epic stories in lyric metres but he is also famous for some ancient traditions about his life, such as his opposition to the tyrant Phalaris, and the blindness he is said to have incurred and cured by composing verses first insulting and then flattering to Helen of Troy.

Therapne

More recently, Otto Skutsch has advanced the theory that the name Helen might have two separate etymologies, which belong to different mythological figures respectively, namely *Sṷelenā (related to Sanskrit svaraṇā "the shining one") and *Selenā, the first a Spartan goddess, connected to one or the other natural light phenomenon (especially St. Elmo's fire) and sister of the Dioscuri, the other a vegetation goddess worshiped in Therapne as Ἑλένα Δενδρῖτις ("Helena of the Trees"). A cult associated with her developed in Hellenistic Laconia, both at Sparta and elsewhere; at Therapne she shared a shrine with Menelaus.
The place was distinguished for housing the Menelaion, a temple to Menelaus, where it was believed that the bodies of Helen of Troy and Menelaus were buried.

Theseus

Theseus and the MinotaurThéséeHero
In her youth, she was abducted by Theseus.
Theseus, in an old tradition, chose Helen, and together they kidnapped her, intending to keep her until she was old enough to marry.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
In Greek mythology, Helen of Troy (Ancient Greek: Ἑλένη Helénē, ), also known as Helen of Sparta, was said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world.
The Trojan War cycle, a collection of epic poems, starts with the events leading up to the war: Eris and the golden apple of Kallisti, the Judgement of Paris, the abduction of Helen, the sacrifice of Iphigenia at Aulis.

Aphrodite

CyprisVenusAphrodite Urania
She was married to King Menelaus of Sparta but was abducted by Prince Paris of Troy after the goddess Aphrodite promised her to him in the Judgement of Paris.
This woman was Helen, who was already married to King Menelaus of Sparta.

Agamemnon

King AgamemnonAchmenrunAgamemnon, King of Mycenae
In most sources, Iphigenia is the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, but Duris of Samos and other writers followed Stesichorus' account.
When Helen, the wife of Menelaus, was taken to Troy by Paris, Agamemnon commanded the united Greek armed forces in the ensuing Trojan War.

Eidolon

astral doubleeidolons
In the version put forth by Euripides in his play Helen, Hera fashioned a likeness of Helen (eidolon, εἴδωλον) out of clouds at Zeus' request, Hermes took her to Egypt, and Helen never went to Troy instead spending the entire war in Egypt.
The concept of Helen of Troy's eidolon was explored both by Homer and Euripides.

Hermione (mythology)

HermioneErmionea figure of mythology
Menelaus and Helen rule in Sparta for at least ten years; they have a daughter, Hermione, and (according to some myths) three sons: Aethiolas, Maraphius, and Pleisthenes.
In Greek mythology, Hermione was the only child of Menelaus, king of Sparta, and his wife, Queen Helen.

Ovid

Publius Ovidius NasoOvidianOvidius
Ovid's Heroides give us an idea of how ancient and, in particular, Roman authors imagined Helen in her youth: she is presented as a young princess wrestling naked in the palaestra, alluding to a part of girls' physical education in classical (not Mycenaean) Sparta.
Paris and Helen, Hero and Leander, and Acontius and Cydippe are the addressees of the paired letters.

Menelaion

Menelaion, Sparta
Modern findings suggest the area around Menelaion in the southern part of the Eurotas valley seems to have been the center of Mycenaean Laconia.
On the hill of Menelaion during the 8th century BCE the eponymous heroes, Menelaus and Helen of Troy, were allegedly worshiped, with a possible altar and enclosure.

Achaeans (Homer)

AchaeansAchaeanAhhiyawa
This resulted in the Trojan War when the Achaeans set out to reclaim her.
Each of the Greek ethne were said to be named in honor of their respective ancestors: Achaeus of the Achaeans, Danaus of the Danaans, Cadmus of the Cadmeans (the Thebans), Hellen of the Hellenes (not to be confused with Helen of Troy), Aeolus of the Aeolians, Ion of the Ionians, and Dorus of the Dorians.