Helena (empress)

HelenaSaint HelenaSaint HelenSt HelenHelena of ConstantinopleSt. HelenaSt. HelenEmpress HelenaHelenSt Helena
Helena, or Saint Helena (Greek: Ἁγία Ἑλένη, Hagía Helénē, Flavia Iulia Helena Augusta; c. 246/248 – c. 330), was an Empress of the Roman Empire, and mother of Emperor Constantine the Great.wikipedia
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True Cross

Holy CrossCrossLignum Crucis
In her final years, she made a religious tour of Syria Palaestina and Jerusalem, during which ancient tradition claims that she discovered the True Cross.
According to post-Nicene historians such as Socrates of Constantinople, Empress Helena, mother of Emperor Constantine, the first Christian emperor of Rome, travelled to the Holy Land in 326–328, founding churches and establishing relief agencies for the poor.

History of Christianity

church historyecclesiastical historyChristian history
Helena ranks as an important figure in the history of Christianity and of the world due to her influence on her son.
The Emperor Constantine I was exposed to Christianity by his mother, Helena.

Constantine the Great

Constantine IConstantineEmperor Constantine
330), was an Empress of the Roman Empire, and mother of Emperor Constantine the Great. Born outside of the noble classes, a Greek, possibly in the Greek city of Drepana, Bithynia in Asia Minor, she became the of the future Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the future Emperor Constantine the Great.
His mother, Helena, was Greek.

Helenopolis (Bithynia)

HelenopolisCivetotBishop of Helenopolis
Born outside of the noble classes, a Greek, possibly in the Greek city of Drepana, Bithynia in Asia Minor, she became the of the future Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the future Emperor Constantine the Great.
It is traditionally considered as the birthplace of Saint Helena.

Constantius Chlorus

ConstantiusConstantius IConstantius I Chlorus
Born outside of the noble classes, a Greek, possibly in the Greek city of Drepana, Bithynia in Asia Minor, she became the of the future Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the future Emperor Constantine the Great.
To strengthen the ties between the emperor and his powerful military servant, in 289 Constantius divorced his wife (or concubine) Helena, and married the emperor Maximian’s daughter, Theodora.

Christian pilgrimage

pilgrimagepilgrimspilgrimages
According to Eusebius of Caesarea (260/265 – 339/340), who records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces, she was responsible for the construction or beautification of two churches, the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, and the Church of Eleona on the Mount of Olives, sites of Christ's birth and ascension, respectively.
Aside from the early example of Origen in the third century, surviving descriptions of Christian pilgrimages to the Holy Land date from the 4th century, when pilgrimage was encouraged by church fathers including Saint Jerome, and established by Saint Helena, the mother of Constantine the Great.

Church of the Nativity

Basilica of the NativityBirthplace of Jesus: Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, BethlehemChurch of the Nativity, Bethlehem
According to Eusebius of Caesarea (260/265 – 339/340), who records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces, she was responsible for the construction or beautification of two churches, the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, and the Church of Eleona on the Mount of Olives, sites of Christ's birth and ascension, respectively.
The church was originally commissioned by Constantine the Great a short time after his mother Helena's visit to Jerusalem and Bethlehem in 325–326, on the site that was traditionally considered to be the birthplace of Jesus.

List of Augustae

AugustaAugustaeEmpress
330), was an Empress of the Roman Empire, and mother of Emperor Constantine the Great.

Calvary

GolgothaMount CalvaryGolgatha
Emperor Hadrian had built during the 130s a temple to Venus over the supposed site of Jesus's tomb near Calvary, and renamed the city Aelia Capitolina.
Its traditional site, identified by Helena of Constantinople, the mother of Constantine the Great, in 325, is at the site of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Helenopolis (Palaestina Secunda)

Helenopolis (Palestine)Helenopolis in PalaestinaHelenopolis in Palestine
There was also a Helenopolis in Palestine and a Helenopolis in Lydia.
It was named for the mother of Constantine the Great, Helena.

Stavrovouni Monastery

Stavrovouni
The rope, considered to be the only relic of its kind, has been held at the Stavrovouni Monastery, which was also said to have been founded by Helena.
Stavrovouni Monastery was founded by Saint Helena (Saint Constantine's mother) in around 327–329 AD and therefore it is one of the oldest monasteries in the world.

Saint Catherine's Monastery

St. Catherine's MonasteryOrthodox Church of Mount SinaiSaint Catherine Area
The chapel at Saint Catherine's Monastery—often referred to as the Chapel of Saint Helen—is dated to the year AD 330.
The monastery was built by order of Emperor Justinian I (reigned 527–565), enclosing the Chapel of the Burning Bush (also known as "Saint Helen's Chapel") ordered to be built by Empress Consort Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, at the site where Moses is supposed to have seen the burning bush.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Holy SepulchreChurch of the Holy Sepulchertomb
On the site of discovery, Constantine ordered the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
After seeing a vision of a cross in the sky in 312, Constantine the Great converted to Christianity, signed the Edict of Milan legalising the religion, and sent his mother Helena to Jerusalem to look for Christ's tomb.

Church of the Pater Noster

Eleona BasilicaChurch of EleonaCarmel of the Pater Noster
According to Eusebius of Caesarea (260/265 – 339/340), who records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces, she was responsible for the construction or beautification of two churches, the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, and the Church of Eleona on the Mount of Olives, sites of Christ's birth and ascension, respectively.
It was built under the direction of Constantine's mother Helena in the early 4th century, who named it the Church of the Disciples.

Macarius of Jerusalem

MacariusSaint MacariusMacarius I
Possibly through Bishop Macarius of Jerusalem, she had a woman who was near death brought from the city.
About 325 he accompanied Helena Augusta, the mother of Constantine I in her search at Jerusalem for relics of the Passion of Jesus, including the cross on which Jesus of Nazareth was thought to have been crucified.

Flavia Maximiana Theodora

Theodora
In order to obtain a wife more consonant with his rising status, Constantius divorced Helena some time before 289, when he married Theodora, Maximian's daughter under his command.

Santa Croce in Gerusalemme

S. Croce in GerusalemmeCardinal-Priest of Santa Croce in GerusalemmeBasilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem
Her palace was later converted into the Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem.
According to tradition, the basilica was consecrated circa 325 to house the relics of the Passion of Jesus Christ brought to Rome from the Holy Land by Empress St. Helena, mother of Roman Emperor Constantine I.

Seamless robe of Jesus

Holy TunicHoly CoatHoly Coat of Trier
According to one tradition, Helena acquired the Holy Tunic on her trip to Jerusalem and sent it to Trier.
According to legend, Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, discovered the seamless robe in the Holy Land in the year 327 or 328 along with several other relics, including the True Cross.

Syria Palaestina

PalestinePalaestinaRoman Palestine
In her final years, she made a religious tour of Syria Palaestina and Jerusalem, during which ancient tradition claims that she discovered the True Cross.
After the Jewish–Roman wars (66–135), which Epiphanius believed the Cenacle survived, the significance of Jerusalem to Christians entered a period of decline, Jerusalem having been temporarily converted to the pagan Aelia Capitolina, but interest resumed again with the pilgrimage of Helena (the mother of Constantine the Great) to the Holy Land c. 326–28.

Flores de Mayo

SantacruzanFlores de Mayo (Santacruzan)
Her discovery of the Cross along with Constantine is dramatised in the Santacruzan, a ritual pageant in the Philippines.
It honors the finding of the True Cross by Helena of Constantinople (known as Reyna Elena) and Constantine the Great.

Pontus (region)

Pontusancient PontusPontos
These cities, and the province of Helenopontus in the Pontus, were probably all named after Constantine's mother.

Holy Nail

Holy NailsnailsNail (relic)
Sozomen and Theodoret claim that Helena also found the nails of the crucifixion.
Sozomen and Theodoret reported that when Helena, the mother of Constantine the Great, discovered the True Cross in Jerusalem in the fourth century AD, the Holy Nails were recovered too.

Mausoleum of Helena

himselfSubaugusta
She was buried in the Mausoleum of Helena, outside Rome on the Via Labicana.
It was built by the Roman emperor Constantine I between 326 and 330, originally as a tomb for himself, but later assigned to his mother, Helena, who died in 330.

Palestine (region)

PalestinePalestinianPalestine region
In 326–28 Helena undertook a trip to Palestine.
Following the victory of Christian emperor Constantine in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy, the Christianization of the Roman Empire began, and in 326, Constantine's mother Saint Helena visited Jerusalem and began the construction of churches and shrines.

Bithynia

ancient BithyniaKingdom of BithyniaBithynian
Born outside of the noble classes, a Greek, possibly in the Greek city of Drepana, Bithynia in Asia Minor, she became the of the future Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the future Emperor Constantine the Great.