Hell

eternal punishmentinfernoinfernaleternal damnationthe placeDown Thereeverlasting punishmenthellsthe other placeunderworld
In religion and folklore, Hell is an afterlife location in which evil souls are subjected to punitive suffering, often torture as eternal punishment after death.wikipedia
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Heaven

celestialParadiseheavenly kingdom
Other afterlife destinations include Heaven, Paradise, Purgatory, Limbo, and the underworld. Serer religion rejects the general notion of heaven and hell.
Heaven is often described as a "higher place", the holiest place, a Paradise, in contrast to hell or the Underworld or the "low places", and universally or conditionally accessible by earthly beings according to various standards of divinity, goodness, piety, faith, or other virtues or right beliefs or simply the will of God.

Limbo

Limbo of InfantsLimbolandLimbo of the Fathers
Other afterlife destinations include Heaven, Paradise, Purgatory, Limbo, and the underworld.
In Catholic theology, Limbo (Latin limbus, edge or boundary, referring to the edge of Hell) is a postulated viewpoint concerning the afterlife condition of those who die in original sin without being assigned to the Hell of the Damned.

Paradise

paradisicalparadisalparadisiacal
Other afterlife destinations include Heaven, Paradise, Purgatory, Limbo, and the underworld.
Paradise is often described as a "higher place", the holiest place, in contrast to this world, or underworlds such as Hell.

Afterlife

life after deathhereafterafter death
In religion and folklore, Hell is an afterlife location in which evil souls are subjected to punitive suffering, often torture as eternal punishment after death.
Heaven is often described as a "higher place", the holiest place, a paradise, in contrast to hell or the underworld or the "low places", and universally or conditionally accessible by earthly beings according to various standards of divinity, goodness, piety, faith or other virtues or right beliefs or simply the will of God.

Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
Religions with a linear divine history often depict hells as eternal destinations, the biggest examples of which are Christianity and Islam, whereas religions with reincarnation usually depict a hell as an intermediary period between incarnations, as is the case in the dharmic religions.
The Qurʼan lists several sins that can condemn a person to hell, such as disbelief in God, and dishonesty; however, the Qurʼan makes it clear God will forgive the sins of those who repent if he so wills.

Purgatory

purgatorialpurgationForsaken Soul
Other afterlife destinations include Heaven, Paradise, Purgatory, Limbo, and the underworld.
Rabbinical Judaism also believes in the possibility of after-death purification and may even use the word "purgatory" to describe the similar rabbinical concept of Gehenna, though Gehenna is also sometimes described as more similar to hell or Hades.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Religions with a linear divine history often depict hells as eternal destinations, the biggest examples of which are Christianity and Islam, whereas religions with reincarnation usually depict a hell as an intermediary period between incarnations, as is the case in the dharmic religions.
Most Christians believe that human beings experience divine judgment and are rewarded either with eternal life or eternal damnation.

Damnation

damneddamneternal damnation
Sometimes these distinctions are specific, with damned souls suffering for each sin committed (see for example Plato's myth of Er or Dante's The Divine Comedy), but sometimes they are general, with condemned sinners relegated to one or more chamber of Hell or to a level of suffering.
A damned human "in damnation" is said to be either in Hell, or living in a state wherein they are divorced from Heaven and/or in a state of disgrace from God's favor.

Divine Comedy

The Divine ComedyInfernoDivina Commedia
Sometimes these distinctions are specific, with damned souls suffering for each sin committed (see for example Plato's myth of Er or Dante's The Divine Comedy), but sometimes they are general, with condemned sinners relegated to one or more chamber of Hell or to a level of suffering. Hell is often depicted in art and literature, perhaps most famously in Dante's Divine Comedy.
The Divine Comedy is composed of 14,233 lines that are divided into three cantiche (singular cantica) – Inferno (Hell), Purgatorio (Purgatory), and Paradiso (Paradise) – each consisting of 33 cantos (Italian plural canti).

Allegory of the long spoons

A fable about Hell which recurs in folklore across several cultures is the allegory of the long spoons.
In hell, the people cannot cooperate, and consequently starve.

Diyu

HellUnderworldjigoku
Also Diyu, Daoist Hell.
Diyu is the realm of the dead or "hell" in Chinese mythology.

Naraka

hellearth prisonsneraka
The hells of Asia include the Bagobo "Gimokodan" and Ancient Indian mythology's "Kalichi" or "Naraka".
Naraka (नरक, literally of man) is the Sanskrit word for the realm of hell in Dharmic traditions.

Lake of fire

Hell firelake of "fire and brimstonelake of eternal fire
If found guilty the person was thrown to Ammit, the "devourer of the dead" and would be condemned to the lake of fire. Therefore, annihilationism includes the doctrine that "the wicked" are also destroyed rather than tormented forever in traditional "Hell" or the lake of fire.
In the biblical context, the concept seems analogous to the Jewish Gehenna, or the more common concept of Hell.

Dryhthelm

DrithelmVision of DryhthelmDryhthelm of Melrose
But cold also played a part in earlier Christian depictions of Hell, beginning with the Apocalypse of Paul, originally from the early third century; the "Vision of Dryhthelm" by the Venerable Bede from the seventh century; "St Patrick's Purgatory", "The Vision of Tundale" or "Visio Tnugdali", and the "Vision of the Monk of Eynsham", all from the twelfth century;
In the "vision of Dryhthelm", the future monk of Melrose was shown hell, purgatory, and heaven, along with some of the souls therein, but was denied entry to paradise.

Visio Tnugdali

Vision of TundaleThe Vision of TundaleTnugdalus
But cold also played a part in earlier Christian depictions of Hell, beginning with the Apocalypse of Paul, originally from the early third century; the "Vision of Dryhthelm" by the Venerable Bede from the seventh century; "St Patrick's Purgatory", "The Vision of Tundale" or "Visio Tnugdali", and the "Vision of the Monk of Eynsham", all from the twelfth century;
The visio tells of the proud and easygoing knight falling unconscious for three days, during which time an angel guides his soul through Heaven and Hell, experiencing some of the torments of the damned.

Death

mortalitydeceaseddead
Rejection and becoming a wandering soul is a sort of hell for one passing over.
Many cultures and religions have the idea of an afterlife, and also hold the idea of reward or judgement and punishment for past sin.

Soul

soulsspirithuman soul
In religion and folklore, Hell is an afterlife location in which evil souls are subjected to punitive suffering, often torture as eternal punishment after death.
Thus, in the concept of divine judgment, God is commonly said to have options with regard to the dispensation of souls, ranging from Heaven (i.e., angels) to hell (i.e., demons), with various concepts in between.

Apocalypse of Paul

Visio PauliVisio sancti PauliVision of Paul
But cold also played a part in earlier Christian depictions of Hell, beginning with the Apocalypse of Paul, originally from the early third century; the "Vision of Dryhthelm" by the Venerable Bede from the seventh century; "St Patrick's Purgatory", "The Vision of Tundale" or "Visio Tnugdali", and the "Vision of the Monk of Eynsham", all from the twelfth century;
The text is primarily focused on a detailed account of Heaven and Hell.

Rich man and Lazarus

LazarusLazarus and DivesDives and Lazarus
The Tale of Khaemwese describes the torment of a rich man, who lacked charity, when he dies and compares it to the blessed state of a poor man who has also died.
Western Christians usually interpret Lazarus as being in Heaven or Paradise and the rich man in Hell.

Gehenna

GehinnomHinnomValley of Hinnom
Upon the Christianization of the Germanic peoples, extension of Proto-Germanic *xaljō were reinterpreted to denote the underworld in Christian mythology, for which see Gehenna.
This is different from the more neutral Sheol/Hades, the abode of the dead, although the King James Version of the Bible usually translates both with the Anglo-Saxon word "hell".

Annihilationism

annihilationannihilationistannihilation of the wicked
Therefore, annihilationism includes the doctrine that "the wicked" are also destroyed rather than tormented forever in traditional "Hell" or the lake of fire.
It states that after the final judgment some human beings and all fallen angels (all of the damned) will be totally destroyed so as to not exist, or that their consciousness will be extinguished, rather than suffer everlasting torment in hell (often synonymized with the lake of fire).

Serer religion

Serer religiousA ƭat Roogreligion
Serer religion rejects the general notion of heaven and hell.
There is no heaven or hell in the Serer religion.

Universal reconciliation

universal salvationChristian universalistuniversalism
However, many Liberal Christians throughout Liberal Protestant and Anglican churches believe in universal reconciliation (see below), even though it contradicts the traditional doctrines that are usually held by the evangelicals within their denominations.
Universal salvation may be related to the perception of a problem of Hell, standing opposed to ideas such as endless conscious torment in Hell, but may also include a period of finite punishment similar to a state of purgatory.

Martin Luther

LutherLutheranLuther, Martin
Rejection of the immortality of the soul, and advocacy of Christian mortalism, was a feature of Protestantism since the early days of the Reformation with Martin Luther himself rejecting the traditional idea, though his mortalism did not carry into orthodox Lutheranism.
Luther later compared his education there to purgatory and hell.

Tophet

TophethThafeth
Tophet became a theological or poetic synonym for Hell within Christendom.