Hell's Angels (film)

Hell's AngelsHells AngelsHell's AngelHell's Angels'' (film)
Hell's Angels is a 1930 pre-Code independently made American epic aviation war film, directed and produced by Howard Hughes, that stars Ben Lyon, James Hall, and Jean Harlow.wikipedia
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Howard Hughes

Howard Robard Hughes, Jr.Howard R. HughesHoward R. Hughes, Jr.
Hell's Angels is a 1930 pre-Code independently made American epic aviation war film, directed and produced by Howard Hughes, that stars Ben Lyon, James Hall, and Jean Harlow.
As a maverick film tycoon, Hughes gained fame in Hollywood beginning in the late 1920s, when he produced big-budget and often controversial films such as The Racket (1928), Hell's Angels (1930), and Scarface (1932).

Jean Harlow

HarlowHarlowesque
Hell's Angels is a 1930 pre-Code independently made American epic aviation war film, directed and produced by Howard Hughes, that stars Ben Lyon, James Hall, and Jean Harlow.
Harlow was signed by director Howard Hughes, and her first major appearance was in Hell's Angels (1930), followed by a series of critically unsuccessful films before she signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1932.

Ben Lyon

Hell's Angels is a 1930 pre-Code independently made American epic aviation war film, directed and produced by Howard Hughes, that stars Ben Lyon, James Hall, and Jean Harlow.
He had success as an actor in the 1930 film Hell's Angels.

Harry Behn

The film, which was written by Harry Behn and Howard Estabrook, was released by United Artists.
He was involved in writing scenes and continuities for a number of screenplays, including the war film The Big Parade in 1925, and Hell's Angels.

James Hall (actor)

James Hall
Hell's Angels is a 1930 pre-Code independently made American epic aviation war film, directed and produced by Howard Hughes, that stars Ben Lyon, James Hall, and Jean Harlow.
In 1930, he co-starred in Howard Hughes' epic film, Hell's Angels.

Frank Clarke (pilot)

Frank ClarkeFrank Clark
His most prominent role was as Leutnant von Bruen (and double for von Richthofen in combat scenes) in the 1930 production Hell's Angels, but he flew for the camera and performed stunts in more than a dozen films in the 1930s and '40s.

Wyndham Standing

Wyndham
Standing delivered a memorable performance in Hell's Angels (1930) as the commanding officer who gets fed up with the cowardly antics of Ben Lyon and James Hall just before sending them off on a deadly bombing mission.

The Dawn Patrol (1930 film)

The Dawn PatrolDawn PatrolThe Dawn Patrol'' (1930 film)
Controversy during the Hell's Angels production contributed to the film's notoriety, including the accidental deaths of several pilots, an inflated budget, a lawsuit against a competitor (The Dawn Patrol), and repeated postponements of the release date.
The suit alleged that The Dawn Patrol plagiarized his Hell's Angels (1930) production, also in production.

Marian Marsh

Violet Krauth
She was seen in a small role in Howard Hughes's classic Hell's Angels (1930) and Eddie Cantor's lavish Technicolor musical Whoopee! (1930).

Jane Winton

Her film appearances include roles in Tomorrow's Love (1925), Why Girls Go Back Home (1926), Sunrise (1927), The Crystal Cup (1927), The Fair Co-Ed (1927), Burning Daylight (1928), Melody of Love (1928), and The Patsy (1928), Scandal (1929), Show Girl in Hollywood (1929), The Furies (1930), and Hell's Angels (1930).

Wilhelm von Brincken

William VaughnWilliam VaughanWilliam von Brinken
In 1929 and 1930 he had small roles in several films before receiving featured roles such as in the Eddie Foy and Irene Dunne film, Leathernecking, and playing the German ace, Baron Manfred von Richthofen in Howard Hughes' 1930 classic, Hells Angels.

James Whale

When Hughes made the decision to turn Hell's Angels into a talkie, he hired a then-unknown James Whale, who had just arrived in Hollywood following a successful turn directing the play Journey's End in London and on Broadway, to direct the talking sequences; it was Whale's film debut, and arguably prepared him for the later success he would have with the feature version of Journey's End, Waterloo Bridge, and, most famously, the 1931 version of Frankenstein.
Apart from Journey's End (1930), which was released by Tiffany Films, and Hell's Angels (1930), released by United Artists, he directed a dozen films for Universal Pictures between 1931 and 1937, developing a style characterized by the influence of German Expressionism and a highly mobile camera.

Luther Reed

Luther A. Reed
Hughes first hired Luther Reed, on loan from Paramount but still was in conflict over directing roles before hiring a more pliable director, Edmund Goulding, but took over the directing reins when it came to the frenetic aerial battle scenes.
Reed directed such films as Convention Girl, Dixiana and Hit the Deck. He also worked with Howard Hughes on the film Hell's Angels.

Carl von Haartman

He played the Zeppelin commander in Hell's Angels (1930) directed by Howard Hughes and starring Jean Harlow.

Marshall Neilan

Marshal NeilanMarshall Neilman
Hell's Angels had been originally conceived as a silent, with James Hall and Ben Lyon as Roy and Monte Rutledge, and Norwegian silent film star Greta Nissen cast as Helen, the female lead, and was to be directed by Marshall Neilan.
A talented screenwriter, in 1927 he wrote the original story for the Howard Hughes film, Hell's Angels.

Greta Nissen

Hell's Angels had been originally conceived as a silent, with James Hall and Ben Lyon as Roy and Monte Rutledge, and Norwegian silent film star Greta Nissen cast as Helen, the female lead, and was to be directed by Marshall Neilan.
Greta was the original choice for leading lady in Hell's Angels (1930), an epic film made by Howard Hughes.

Joseph Moncure March

J.M. March
Unhappy with the script, Whale brought in Joseph Moncure March to re-write it. Hughes later gave March the Luger pistol used in the famous execution scene near the film's ending.
In 1929, March moved to Hollywood to provide additional dialogue for the film Journey's End and, more famously, to turn the silent version of Howard Hughes' classic Hell's Angels into a talkie — a rewrite that brought the phrase "Excuse me while I put on something more comfortable" into the American lexicon.

Al Wilson (pilot)

Al Wilson
Rupert Syme Macalister, an Australian pilot, was also killed, and mechanic Phil Jones died during production after he failed to bail out before the crash of a German Gotha bomber, piloted by Al Wilson, which had been doubled by Igor Sikorsky's Sikorsky S-29-A, his first biplane built after his arrival in the United States.
Wilson was also one of the pilots in Hell's Angels (1930) and during filming, he was involved in an accident where the mechanic Phil Jones died.

Royal Flying Corps

RFCairmanBritish Royal Flying Corps
Karl is conscripted into the German Air Force, and the two British brothers enlist in the Royal Flying Corps (RFC), Monte only to get a kiss from a girl at the recruiting station.
Hell's Angels (1930): a film directed by Howard Hughes, starring Jean Harlow

Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Best CinematographyBest Cinematography, Black-and-WhiteBest Cinematography, Color
Hell's Angels received one Academy Award nomination, Best Cinematography (Tony Gaudio and Harry Perry).

Spy basket

observation carspähkorb
As the bombardier-observer, he is lowered below the clouds in a spy basket.
The spy basket's use is dramatized in the 1930 film Hell's Angels.