Hemolymph

haemolymphcirculatory systemheamolymph
Hemolymph, or haemolymph, is a fluid, analogous to the blood in vertebrates, that circulates in the interior of the arthropod body remaining in direct contact with the animal's tissues.wikipedia
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Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
Hemolymph, or haemolymph, is a fluid, analogous to the blood in vertebrates, that circulates in the interior of the arthropod body remaining in direct contact with the animal's tissues.
Insects and some mollusks use a fluid called hemolymph instead of blood, the difference being that hemolymph is not contained in a closed circulatory system.

Hemocyanin

haemocyaninImmunocyaniniron-based red blood
It contains hemocyanin, a copper-based protein that turns blue when oxygenated, instead of the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, giving hemolymph a blue-green color rather than the red color of vertebrate blood.
Unlike the hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, hemocyanins are not bound to blood cells but are instead suspended directly in the hemolymph.

Arachnid

Arachnidaarachnidsarachnoid
It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects).
Spiders and whipscorpions extend their limbs hydraulically using the pressure of their hemolymph.

Grasshopper

grasshoppersshort-horned grasshopperCaelifera
In the grasshopper, the closed portion of the system consists of tubular hearts and an aorta running along the dorsal side of the insect.
Like other insects, grasshoppers have an open circulatory system and their body cavities are filled with haemolymph.

Hemocyte (invertebrate immune system cell)

hemocyteshaemocyteshemocyte
It is composed of a fluid plasma in which hemolymph cells called hemocytes are suspended.
It is found within the hemolymph.

Respiratory system of insects

respiratory systemInsect respirationrespirate
The hemolymph of lower arthropods, including most insects, is not used for oxygen transport because these animals respirate through other means, such as tracheas, but it does contain nutrients such as proteins and sugars.
The respiratory system of insects (and many other arthropods) is separate from the circulatory system.

Insect

Insectainsectsbugs
It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects). The hemolymph of lower arthropods, including most insects, is not used for oxygen transport because these animals respirate through other means, such as tracheas, but it does contain nutrients such as proteins and sugars.
The dorsal blood vessel circulates the hemolymph, arthropods' fluid analog of blood, from the rear of the body cavity forward.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects).
In arthropods, the open circulatory system is a system in which a fluid in a cavity called the hemocoel bathes the organs directly with oxygen and nutrients and there is no distinction between blood and interstitial fluid; this combined fluid is called hemolymph or haemolymph.

Beetle

Coleopterabeetleschafer
Such nucleating agents have been found in the hemolymph of insects of several orders, i.e., Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies), and Hymenoptera.
Like other insects, beetles have open circulatory systems, based on hemolymph rather than blood.

Animal locomotion

locomotionlocomotor activitylocomotor
Muscular movements by the animal during locomotion can facilitate hemolymph movement, but diverting flow from one area to another is limited.
Spiders and whipscorpions extend their limbs hydraulically using the pressure of their hemolymph.

Arthropod

ArthropodaarthropodsEuarthropoda
It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects).
Arthropods' primary internal cavity is a haemocoel, which accommodates their internal organs, and through which their haemolymph – analogue of blood – circulates; they have open circulatory systems.

Leptanilla

Queens of the ant genus Leptanilla are fed with hemolymph produced by the larvae.
Like other genera in this subfamily, the queen is fed by the hemolymph of their own larvae, which have specialized processes for this purpose.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
When the heart relaxes, blood is drawn back toward the heart through open-ended pores called ostia.
Instead of blood the circulatory fluid is haemolymph which carries the most commonly used respiratory pigment, copper-based haemocyanin as the oxygen transporter; iron-based haemoglobin is used by only a few arthropods.

Insect physiology

corpora cardiacainsect flight muscleneural ganglions
Since oxygen is delivered directly, the circulatory system is not used to carry oxygen, and is therefore greatly reduced; it has no closed vessels (i.e., no veins or arteries), consisting of little more than a single, perforated dorsal tube which pulses peristaltically, and in doing so helps circulate the hemolymph inside the body cavity.

Pemphigus spyrothecae

On the other hand, Pemphigus spyrothecae utilize hemolymph as an adhesive, allowing the species to stick to predators and subsequently attack the predator; it was found that with larger predators, more aphids were stuck after the predator was defeated.
While attacking a predator, haemolymph oozed out and caused the aphids to stick to predator.

Vertebrate

Vertebratavertebratesvertebral
Hemolymph, or haemolymph, is a fluid, analogous to the blood in vertebrates, that circulates in the interior of the arthropod body remaining in direct contact with the animal's tissues.

Crustacean

Crustaceacrustaceanscarcinology
It is the major tissue type of the open circulatory system characteristic of arthropods (e.g. arachnids, crustaceans and insects).

Mollusca

molluskmolluscmolluscs
In addition, some non-arthropods such as molluscs possess a hemolymphatic circulatory system.

Copper

CuCu 2+ cupric
It contains hemocyanin, a copper-based protein that turns blue when oxygenated, instead of the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, giving hemolymph a blue-green color rather than the red color of vertebrate blood.

Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)
It contains hemocyanin, a copper-based protein that turns blue when oxygenated, instead of the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, giving hemolymph a blue-green color rather than the red color of vertebrate blood.

Hemoglobin

haemoglobinoxyhemoglobindeoxyhemoglobin
It contains hemocyanin, a copper-based protein that turns blue when oxygenated, instead of the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, giving hemolymph a blue-green color rather than the red color of vertebrate blood.

Red blood cell

red blood cellserythrocyteserythroid
It contains hemocyanin, a copper-based protein that turns blue when oxygenated, instead of the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates, giving hemolymph a blue-green color rather than the red color of vertebrate blood.

Ostium

ostiaostial
Note that the term "ostia" is not specific to insect circulation; it literally means "doors" or "openings", and must be understood in context.

Fly

Dipterafliestrue flies
Such nucleating agents have been found in the hemolymph of insects of several orders, i.e., Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies), and Hymenoptera.

Hymenoptera

hymenopteranhymenopteransbees and wasps
Such nucleating agents have been found in the hemolymph of insects of several orders, i.e., Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (flies), and Hymenoptera.