Henoch–Schönlein purpura

Henoch-Schonlein purpuraIgA vasculitispurpura, schoenlein-henochAllergic purpuraanaphylactoid purpuraHenoch-Schönlein purpuraHenoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP)Purpura, Schönlein–HenochRheumatoid purpuraSchönlein-Henoch purpura
Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), also known as IgA vasculitis, is a disease of the skin, mucous membranes, and sometimes other organs that most commonly affects children.wikipedia
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Arthritis

arthriticjoint inflammationarthritic changes
Purpura, arthritis, and abdominal pain are known as the "classic triad" of Henoch–Schönlein purpura.

IgA nephropathy

Berger's diseaseBerger diseaseglomerulonephritis, iga
As with IgA nephropathy, serum levels of IgA are high in HSP and there are identical findings on renal biopsy; however, IgA nephropathy has a predilection for young adults while HSP is more predominant among children.
There are other diseases associated with glomerular IgA deposits, the most common being IgA vasculitis (formerly known as Henoch–Schönlein purpura [HSP]), which is considered by many to be a systemic form of IgA nephropathy.

Abdominal pain

stomach acheupset stomachabdominal discomfort
Purpura, arthritis, and abdominal pain are known as the "classic triad" of Henoch–Schönlein purpura. In the skin, the disease causes palpable purpura (small, raised areas of bleeding underneath the skin), often with joint pain and abdominal pain.

Palpable purpura

In the skin, the disease causes palpable purpura (small, raised areas of bleeding underneath the skin), often with joint pain and abdominal pain.

Intussusception (medical disorder)

intussusceptionictusintro-susception
Some include gastrointestinal hemorrhage as a fourth criterion; this occurs in 33% of cases, sometimes, but not necessarily always, due to intussusception.
In rare cases, intussusception may be a complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), an immune-mediated vasculitis disease in children.

Purpura

purpuricFood-induced purpuraPurpura secondary to clotting disorders
Purpura, arthritis, and abdominal pain are known as the "classic triad" of Henoch–Schönlein purpura.

Vasculitis

vasculitidesvasculiticvasculitis, central nervous system
HSP is a systemic vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels) and is characterized by deposition of immune complexes containing the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA); the exact cause for this phenomenon is unknown. If there is doubt about the cause of the skin lesions, a biopsy of the skin may be performed to distinguish the purpura from other diseases that cause it, such as vasculitis due to cryoglobulinemia; on microscopy the appearances are of a hypersensitivity vasculitis, and immunofluorescence demonstrates IgA and C3 (a protein of the complement system) in the blood vessel wall.

Proteinuria

protein in the urineproteinIsolated proteinuria
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.

Cryoglobulinemia

cryoglobulinaemiaEssential mixed cryoglobulinemiaCryroglobulinemia
If there is doubt about the cause of the skin lesions, a biopsy of the skin may be performed to distinguish the purpura from other diseases that cause it, such as vasculitis due to cryoglobulinemia; on microscopy the appearances are of a hypersensitivity vasculitis, and immunofluorescence demonstrates IgA and C3 (a protein of the complement system) in the blood vessel wall.

Immunoglobulin A

IgASecretory IgAIgA1
HSP is a systemic vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels) and is characterized by deposition of immune complexes containing the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA); the exact cause for this phenomenon is unknown.
Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic disorder caused by deposits of IgA and complement component 3 (C3) in the small vessels.

Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis

leukocytoclastic vasculitisHypersensitivity vasculitiscutaneous vasculitis
If there is doubt about the cause of the skin lesions, a biopsy of the skin may be performed to distinguish the purpura from other diseases that cause it, such as vasculitis due to cryoglobulinemia; on microscopy the appearances are of a hypersensitivity vasculitis, and immunofluorescence demonstrates IgA and C3 (a protein of the complement system) in the blood vessel wall.
For example, if the vasculitis is a manifestation of Henoch-Schönlein purpura, individuals may also experience abdominal pain or blood in the urine.

Moritz Heinrich Romberg

The disease is named after Eduard Heinrich Henoch (1820–1910), a German pediatrician (nephew of Moritz Heinrich Romberg) and his teacher Johann Lukas Schönlein (1793–1864), who described it in the 1860s.
His nephew was Eduard Heinrich Henoch, who was known for describing Henoch–Schönlein purpura.

Johann Lukas Schönlein

J. L. SchönleinSchönl.J.L. Schönlein
The disease is named after Eduard Heinrich Henoch (1820–1910), a German pediatrician (nephew of Moritz Heinrich Romberg) and his teacher Johann Lukas Schönlein (1793–1864), who described it in the 1860s.
Schönlein described purpura rheumatica (Schönlein's disease) an allergic non-thrombopenic purpura rash that became known as Henoch–Schönlein purpura, though now known as IgA vasculitis.

Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy

Henoch–Schönlein purpura may present with an atypical manifestation, which can be confused with papular urticaria, systemic lupus erythematosus, meningococcemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, and acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy.

Eduard Heinrich Henoch

The disease is named after Eduard Heinrich Henoch (1820–1910), a German pediatrician (nephew of Moritz Heinrich Romberg) and his teacher Johann Lukas Schönlein (1793–1864), who described it in the 1860s.
In 1868 he described the association of colic, bloody diarrhea, painful joints, and rash in the condition, previously described by his former medical school teacher Johann Lukas Schönlein, of the allergic non-thrombopenic purpural rash that became known as Henoch–Schönlein purpura, though now known as IgA vasculitis.

Mucous membrane

mucosamucous membranesmucosal
Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), also known as IgA vasculitis, is a disease of the skin, mucous membranes, and sometimes other organs that most commonly affects children.

Organ (anatomy)

organorgansviscera
Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), also known as IgA vasculitis, is a disease of the skin, mucous membranes, and sometimes other organs that most commonly affects children.

Child

childrenschoolchildrenkids
Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), also known as IgA vasculitis, is a disease of the skin, mucous membranes, and sometimes other organs that most commonly affects children.

Arthralgia

joint painjoint painsarthralgias
In the skin, the disease causes palpable purpura (small, raised areas of bleeding underneath the skin), often with joint pain and abdominal pain.

Kidney

kidneysrenalkidney disorder
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.

Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.

Protein

proteinsproteinaceousstructural proteins
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.

Urine

urinaryhuman urinepiss
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.

Hematuria

blood in the urinehaematuriabloody urine
With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease.