Henri Bergson

BergsonBergsonianBergsonismHenri Louis BergsonThe Two Sources of Morality and ReligionBergson, HenriHenri-Louis Bergson
Henri-Louis Bergson (18 October 1859 – 4 January 1941) was a French-Jewish philosopher who was influential in the tradition of continental philosophy, especially during the first half of the 20th century until the Second World War.wikipedia
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Lycée Condorcet

Collège BourbonLycee CondorcetLycée Fontanes
Bergson attended the Lycée Fontanes (known as the Lycée Condorcet 1870–1874 and 1883–present) in Paris from 1868 to 1878.
Henri Bergson, Horace Finaly, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Marcel Proust, and Paul Verlaine were educated at the Lycée Condorcet.

Moina Mathers

Bergson's sister, Mina Bergson (also known as Moina Mathers), married the English occult author Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers, a founder of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and the couple later relocated to Paris as well.
She was the sister of French philosopher Henri Bergson, the first man of Jewish descent to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1927.

Creative Evolution (book)

Creative EvolutionL'Évolution Créatricecreative evolutionism
Creative Evolution (L'Évolution créatrice) is a 1907 book by French philosopher Henri Bergson.

Matter and Memory

classification of memoryMatière et Mémoire
Matter and Memory (French: Matière et mémoire, 1896) is a book by the French philosopher Henri Bergson.

École normale supérieure (Paris)

École Normale SupérieureÉcole NormaleEcole Normale Superieure
When he was nineteen, he entered the École Normale Supérieure.
The school has achieved particular recognition in the fields of mathematics and physics as one of France's foremost scientific training grounds, along with notability in the human sciences as the spiritual birthplace of authors such as Julien Gracq, Jean Giraudoux, Assia Djebar, and Charles Péguy, philosophers such as Henri Bergson, Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Simone Weil, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alain Badiou, social scientists such as Émile Durkheim, Raymond Aron, and Pierre Bourdieu, and "French theorists" such as Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers

MacGregor MathersS.L. MacGregor MathersS. L. MacGregor Mathers
Bergson's sister, Mina Bergson (also known as Moina Mathers), married the English occult author Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers, a founder of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and the couple later relocated to Paris as well.
His wife was Moina Mathers (née Mina Bergson), sister of the philosopher Henri Bergson.

Time and Free Will

Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness
Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness (French: Essai sur les données immédiates de la conscience) is Henri Bergson's doctoral thesis, first published in 1889.

Michał Bergson

Michel Bergson
His father, the pianist Michał Bergson, was of a Polish Jewish background (originally bearing the name Bereksohn).
His children included the influential French philosopher Henri Bergson and artist and occultist Moina Mathers, wife of Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers.

Félix Ravaisson-Mollien

Félix RavaissonFelix Ravaisson-MollienRavaisson
Bergson dedicated Time and Free Will to Jules Lachelier (1832–1918), then public education minister, a disciple of Félix Ravaisson (1813–1900) and the author of a philosophical work On the Founding of Induction (Du fondement de l'induction, 1871).
He was a student of Schelling and a teacher of Bergson.

World Congress of Philosophy

International Congress of PhilosophyWorld Congresses of Philosophy2nd Congress of Philosophy
At the first International Congress of Philosophy, held in Paris during the first five days of August 1900, Bergson read a short, but important, paper, "Psychological Origins of the Belief in the Law of Causality" (Sur les origines psychologiques de notre croyance à la loi de causalité).
Among the participants were Henri Bergson, Maurice Blondel, Moritz Cantor, Louis Couturat, Henri Poincaré, and Bertrand Russell.

Marcel Proust

ProustProustianits ostensible subject
Henri Bergson married Louise Neuberger, a cousin of Marcel Proust, in 1891.
Both the translation and the introduction were well-reviewed; Henri Bergson called Proust's introduction "an important contribution to the psychology of Ruskin", and had similar praise for the translation.

French philosophy

French philosopherFrench historical epistemologyhistorical epistemology
Henri-Louis Bergson (18 October 1859 – 4 January 1941) was a French-Jewish philosopher who was influential in the tradition of continental philosophy, especially during the first half of the 20th century until the Second World War.
While Ferdinand de Saussure was a relatively obscure thinker in his time, it may be said that Henri Bergson (1859–1941) was somewhat of a celebrity.

Revue de métaphysique et de morale

In 1903 he contributed to the Revue de métaphysique et de morale a very important essay entitled Introduction to Metaphysics (Introduction à la metaphysique), which is useful as a preface to the study of his three large books.
It was the leading French-language journal for philosophical debates at the 20th century, hosting articles by Victor Delbos, Bergson, etc., and still exists today.

Prix Blumenthal

Blumenthal PrizeFlorence Meyer Blumenthal
Bergson served as a juror with Florence Meyer Blumenthal in awarding the Prix Blumenthal, a grant given between 1919 and 1954 to painters, sculptors, decorators, engravers, writers, and musicians.
Jurors included philosopher Henri Bergson; novelist Roland Dorgelès; novelist, essayist, diplomat and playwright Jean Giraudoux; writer Anna de Noailles; poet and essayist Paul Valéry; painter Paul Signac, painter and printmaker Édouard Vuillard, sculptor Paul Landowski, painter and sculptor Aristide Maillol, architect Auguste Perret, composer Paul Dukas, composer Maurice Ravel and composer/conductor Guy Ropartz.

Perception

perceptualsensorysensory perception
This rather difficult work investigates the function of the brain and undertakes an analysis of perception and memory, leading up to a careful consideration of the problems of the relation of body and mind.
"Percept" is also a term used by Leibniz, Bergson, Deleuze, and Guattari to define perception independent from perceivers.

Continental philosophy

Continentalcontinental philosophercontinental philosophers
Henri-Louis Bergson (18 October 1859 – 4 January 1941) was a French-Jewish philosopher who was influential in the tradition of continental philosophy, especially during the first half of the 20th century until the Second World War.
J. G. Merquior argued that a distinction between analytic and continental philosophies can be first clearly identified with Henri Bergson (1859–1941), whose wariness of science and elevation of intuition paved the way for existentialism.

Collège de France

College de FranceCollège RoyalCollege of France
In 1900 the Collège de France selected Bergson to a Chair of Greek and Roman Philosophy, which he held until 1904.

Agrégation

agrégéagrégation de lettresprofesseur agrégé
He obtained there the degree of licence ès lettres, and this was followed by that of agrégation de philosophie in 1881 from the University of Paris.

Introduction to Metaphysics (Bergson)

Introduction to MetaphysicsAn Introduction to MetaphysicsIntroduction to Metaphysics" (Bergson)
In 1903 he contributed to the Revue de métaphysique et de morale a very important essay entitled Introduction to Metaphysics (Introduction à la metaphysique), which is useful as a preface to the study of his three large books.
"Introduction to Metaphysics" (French: "Introduction à la Métaphysique") is a 1903 essay about the concept of reality by Henri Bergson.

William James

JamesJames, WilliamWilliam
Bergson traveled to London in 1908 and met there with William James, the Harvard philosopher who was Bergson's senior by seventeen years, and who was instrumental in calling the attention of the Anglo-American public to the work of the French professor.
James interacted with a wide array of writers and scholars throughout his life, including his godfather Ralph Waldo Emerson, his godson William James Sidis, as well as Charles Sanders Peirce, Bertrand Russell, Josiah Royce, Ernst Mach, John Dewey, Macedonio Fernández, Walter Lippmann, Mark Twain, Horatio Alger, G. Stanley Hall, Henri Bergson, Carl Jung, Jane Addams and Sigmund Freud.

Herbert Spencer

SpencerSpencerianSpencer, Herbert
During this period, he read Herbert Spencer.
Such varied thinkers as Henry Sidgwick, T.H. Green, G.E. Moore, William James, Henri Bergson, and Émile Durkheim defined their ideas in relation to his.

International Committee on Intellectual Cooperation

International Institute of Intellectual CooperationCommittee on Intellectual CooperationCommittee for Intellectual Cooperation
Duration and simultaneity took advantage of Bergson's experience at the League of Nations, where he presided from 1920 to 1925 over the International Committee on Intellectual Cooperation (the ancestor of UNESCO, and which included Einstein, Marie Curie, etc.).
Established in 1922, it counted such figures as Henri Bergson, Albert Einstein, Marie Curie, Gonzague de Reynold and Robert A. Millikan among its members.

Temerl Bergson

His great-grandmother, Temerl Bergson, was a well-known patroness and benefactor of Polish Jewry, especially those associated with the Hasidic movement.
Among the descendants of Temerl and Berek Bergson were Joseph Bergson (1812–?), an instructor in medicine at the University of Warsaw; Michał Bergson (1820–1898), a Polish composer and pianist; and Henri Bergson (1859–1941), a leading French philosopher and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Gifford Lectures

Gifford LecturerGifford LectureGifford Lecturer in Natural Theology
In 1914 the Scottish universities arranged for Bergson to give the famous Gifford Lectures, planning one course for the spring and another for the autumn.

Process philosophy

philosophy of organismprocessprocesses
His philosophy emphasises pure mobility, unforeseeable novelty, creativity and freedom; thus one can characterize his system as a process philosophy.
Philosophers who appeal to process rather than substance include Heraclitus, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Henri Bergson, Martin Heidegger, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, Alfred North Whitehead, Thomas Nail, Alfred Korzybski, R. G. Collingwood, Alan Watts, Robert M. Pirsig, Roberto Mangabeira Unger, Charles Hartshorne, Arran Gare, Nicholas Rescher, Colin Wilson, Jacques Derrida, Bruno Latour, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and Gilles Deleuze.