Desgrange, c. 1925
Maurice Garin, winner of the first Tour de France standing on the right. The man on the left is possibly Leon Georget (1903)
Henri Desgrange
Fabian Cancellara pictured at the 2010 Tour de France. He is the rider who has worn the yellow jersey as leader of the general classification for the most days without having ever been the overall winner
Henri Desgrange (2nd from right) TdF 1913
Richard Virenque pictured at the 2003 Tour de France wearing the polka dot jersey. He won the mountains classification a record seven times.
Alessandro Petacchi in the green jersey
Andy Schleck in the white jersey
Prize money in 2013 Euros in the Tour de France.
A collected peloton in the 2006 Tour de France
Bradley Wiggins riding the stage 9 individual time trial of the 2012 Tour de France
Altitude profile of the Alpe d'Huez climb
Vehicles from the 2014 Tour de France Publicity Caravan
Start of the 2015 Tour de France in Utrecht
Part of the crowd during most days of the Tour is Didi Senft who, in a red devil costume, has been the Tour devil since 1993.
School book by Augustine Fouillée under the 'nom de plume' G. Bruno.
Spectators' banner during the 2006 Tour de France

He was the first organiser of the Tour de France.

- Henri Desgrange

The new newspaper appointed Henri Desgrange as the editor.

- Tour de France

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The front page of L'Équipe on 4 July 2011

L'Équipe

French nationwide daily newspaper devoted to sport, owned by Éditions Philippe Amaury.

French nationwide daily newspaper devoted to sport, owned by Éditions Philippe Amaury.

The front page of L'Équipe on 4 July 2011
De Dion on one of his company's early products.
Maurice Garin, winner of the first Tour de France

L'Auto originated the Tour de France road cycling stage race in 1903 as a circulation booster.

The editor was a prominent racing cyclist, Henri Desgrange, who had published a book of cycling tactics and training and was working as a publicity writer for Clément.

Géo Lefèvre

Géo Lefèvre (1877–1961) was a French sports journalist and the originator of the idea for the Tour de France.

He suggested the idea for the Tour at a meeting with Henri Desgrange, editor of the daily newspaper L'Auto as a way to boost circulation.

Le Vélo

The leading French sports newspaper from its inception on 1 December 1892 until it ceased publication in 1904.

The leading French sports newspaper from its inception on 1 December 1892 until it ceased publication in 1904.

Its demise was a consequence of the creation of the Tour de France by L'Auto, a rival newspaper that had been founded in 1900 from the intense animosity generated by the Dreyfus affair.

Subsequently, in 1900, they entrusted Henri Desgrange (editor of Paris-Velo or Le Petit Velo) to create the L'Auto-Velo in direct competition to Le Vélo.

Signpost at the Col du Galibier

Col du Galibier

The Col du Galibier (el.

The Col du Galibier (el.

Signpost at the Col du Galibier
Col du Galibier (view of the northern side)
The last mountain pass cycling milestones along the climb from Valloire

The Col du Galibier was first used in the Tour de France in 1911; the first rider over the summit was Emile Georget, who, with Paul Duboc and Gustave Garrigou were the only riders not to walk.

At the south portal of the tunnel, at the edge of the road, there is a monument to Henri Desgrange, instigator and first director of the Tour de France.

Jacques Goddet in 1962

Jacques Goddet

Jacques Goddet in 1962
Jacques Goddet Memorial at Tourmalet

Jacques Goddet (21 June 1905 – 15 December 2000) was a French sports journalist and director of the Tour de France road cycling race from 1936 to 1986.

He became chief reporter at L'Auto and took over organisation of the race when the director, Henri Desgrange, became too ill to continue in 1936.

The monument to Henri Desgrange near the summit of the Col du Galibier

Souvenir Henri Desgrange

The monument to Henri Desgrange near the summit of the Col du Galibier

The Souvenir Henri Desgrange is an award and cash prize given in the yearly running of the Tour de France, one of cycling's Grand Tour races.

It is named in honour of the creator and first race director of the Tour, French sports journalist Henri Desgrange, who was passionate about taking the Tour de France as high up in the mountains as possible using the most difficult routes.

Henri Pelissier, 1919

Henri Pélissier

Henri Pelissier, 1919
Henri Pelissier after finishing the 1914 Tour de France.
Francis and Henri Pelissier
Henri Pelissier in 1919.

Henri Pélissier (22 January 1889 – 1 May 1935) was a French racing cyclist from Paris and champion of the 1923 Tour de France.

In addition to his 29 career victories, he was known for his long-standing feud with Tour founder Henri Desgrange and for protesting against the conditions endured by riders in the early years of the Tour.