Henry A. Wallace

Henry WallaceWallaceHenry Agard WallaceWallace, Henry A.[Henry] WallaceWallace for PresidentWallace presidential campaign
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was an American politician, journalist, and farmer who served as the 11th U.S. secretary of agriculture, the 33rd vice president of the United States, and the 10th U.S. secretary of commerce.wikipedia
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1948 United States presidential election

19481948 presidential election1948 election
He was also the presidential nominee of the left-wing Progressive Party in the 1948 election.
Truman also faced a challenge from the left in the form of former Vice President Henry A. Wallace, who launched the Progressive Party and challenged Truman's confrontational Cold War policies.

Henry Cantwell Wallace

Henry C. WallaceHenry WallaceHarry Wallace
The oldest son of Henry Cantwell Wallace, who served as the U.S. secretary of agriculture from 1921 to 1924, Henry A. Wallace was born in Adair County, Iowa in 1888. Wallace was born on October 7, 1888 on a farm near Orient, Iowa, to Henry Cantwell Wallace and his wife, May.
He was the father of Henry A. Wallace, who would follow in his footsteps as Secretary of Agriculture and later became Vice President under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1940 Democratic National Convention

1940Democratic National Convention1940 presidential nomination
Overcoming strong opposition from conservative party leaders, Wallace was nominated for vice president at the 1940 Democratic National Convention.
Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace from Iowa was nominated for Vice President.

United States Secretary of Commerce

Secretary of CommerceU.S. Secretary of CommerceCommerce Secretary
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was an American politician, journalist, and farmer who served as the 11th U.S. secretary of agriculture, the 33rd vice president of the United States, and the 10th U.S. secretary of commerce.

New Deal

the New DealFirst 100 Daysfirst hundred days
He strongly supported Roosevelt's New Deal and presided over a major shift in federal agricultural policy, implementing measures designed to curtail agricultural surpluses and ameliorate rural poverty.
The rural U.S. was a high priority for Roosevelt and his energetic Secretary of Agriculture, Henry A. Wallace.

United States Secretary of Agriculture

Secretary of AgricultureU.S. Secretary of AgricultureSecretary
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was an American politician, journalist, and farmer who served as the 11th U.S. secretary of agriculture, the 33rd vice president of the United States, and the 10th U.S. secretary of commerce.

DuPont Pioneer

DuPontHi-Bred Corn CompanyPioneer
He also founded the Hi-Bred Corn Company, a hybrid corn company that eventually became extremely successful.
In 1926, farm journal editor and future U.S. Vice President Henry A. Wallace, along with a group of Des Moines, Iowa businessmen, founded the "Hi-Bred Corn Company".

Franklin D. Roosevelt

RooseveltFranklin RooseveltPresident Roosevelt
After the death of his father in 1924, Wallace increasingly drifted away from the Republican Party, and he supported Democratic presidential nominee Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 election.
Harold L. Ickes and Henry A. Wallace, two progressive Republicans, were selected for the roles of Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Agriculture, respectively.

1944 Democratic National Convention

1944Democratic National ConventionDemocratic convention
At the 1944 Democratic National Convention, conservative party leaders defeated Wallace's bid for re-nomination, replacing him on the Democratic ticket with Harry S. Truman.
Henry Wallace had been elected Vice President in 1940.

Harry S. Truman

TrumanHarry TrumanPresident Truman
At the 1944 Democratic National Convention, conservative party leaders defeated Wallace's bid for re-nomination, replacing him on the Democratic ticket with Harry S. Truman.
Vice President Henry Wallace was popular among Democratic voters, but he was viewed as too far to the left and too friendly to labor for some of Roosevelt's advisers.

Wallace's Farmer

Wallaces Farmer
After graduating from Iowa State University in 1910, Wallace worked as a writer and editor for his family's farm journal, Wallace's Farmer.
Henry's son, Henry Cantwell Wallace, and his son, Henry A. Wallace—later a Cabinet secretary and vice president under Franklin Delano Roosevelt—served as editors.

George Washington Carver

CarverCarver DayCarver, George Washington
Wallace took a strong interest in agriculture and plants from a young age, and he befriended African-American botanist George Washington Carver, with whom he frequently talked about plants and other subjects.
He knew Carver personally because his son Henry A. Wallace and the researcher were friends.

1940 United States presidential election

19401940 presidential election1940 election
The Democratic ticket of Roosevelt and Wallace triumphed in the 1940 presidential election, and Wallace continued to play an important role in the Roosevelt administration before and during World War II. As Roosevelt refused to commit to either retiring or seeking re-election during his second term, supporters of Wallace and other leading Democrats such as Vice President John Nance Garner and Postmaster General James Farley laid the groundwork for a presidential campaign in the 1940 election.
The 1940 Democratic National Convention re-nominated Roosevelt on the first ballot, while Garner was replaced on the ticket by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace.

Orient, Iowa

Orient
Wallace was born on October 7, 1888 on a farm near Orient, Iowa, to Henry Cantwell Wallace and his wife, May.
U.S. Vice President Henry A. Wallace (1941–45) was born on a farm near Orient in 1888.

James F. Byrnes

James ByrnesByrnesJames Francis Byrnes
Roosevelt convinced James F. Byrnes, Paul V. McNutt, and other contenders for the Democratic vice presidential nomination to support Wallace, but conservative Democrats rallied around the candidacy of Speaker of the House William B. Bankhead of Alabama.
He was a candidate to replace Henry A. Wallace as Roosevelt's running mate in the 1944 election, but Harry S. Truman was instead nominated by the 1944 Democratic National Convention.

Manhattan Project

atomic bomb projectatomic bombdevelopment of the atomic bomb
He did not hold any official role in the subsequent Manhattan Project, which developed the first nuclear weapons, but he was informed on its progress.
On 9 October 1941, President Roosevelt approved the atomic program after he convened a meeting with Vannevar Bush and Vice President Henry A. Wallace.

John Nance Garner

John N. GarnerGarnerJohn Garner
As Roosevelt refused to commit to either retiring or seeking re-election during his second term, supporters of Wallace and other leading Democrats such as Vice President John Nance Garner and Postmaster General James Farley laid the groundwork for a presidential campaign in the 1940 election.
Garner was replaced as vice president by Henry A. Wallace and retired from public office in 1941.

Calvin Benham Baldwin

C.B. "Beanie" BaldwinCalvin Benham "Beanie" Baldwin
Wallace did not organize an effective organization in support of his candidacy, though allies like Calvin Benham Baldwin, Claude Pepper, and Joseph F. Guffey pressed for him.
Calvin Benham Baldwin, also known as Calvin B Baldwin, C.B. Baldwin, and generally as "Beanie" Baldwin (August 19, 1902 – May 12, 1975), served as assistant to US Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace and administrator of the New Deal's Farm Security Administration in the 1930s, worked for the CIO in the 1940s, and then worked with the Progressive Party from 1948 to 1955.

1944 United States presidential election

19441944 presidential election1944 election
The ticket of Roosevelt and Truman won the 1944 presidential election, and in early 1945 Roosevelt appointed Wallace as secretary of commerce.
However, that convention dropped Vice President Henry A. Wallace as Roosevelt's running mate in favor of Senator Harry S. Truman of Missouri.

Nicholas Roerich

RoerichNicholasInternational Roerich Centre
Accusations of Communist influences and Wallace's association with controversial Theosophist figure Nicholas Roerich undermined his campaign, and he received just 2.4 percent of the nationwide popular vote.
In 1934–1935, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (then headed by Roerich admirer Henry A. Wallace) sponsored an expedition by Roerich and USDA scientists H. G. MacMillan and James F. Stephens to Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, and China.

Buffer stock scheme

ever-normal granarybuffer stockBuffer Stocks
Among his proposed policies was the "ever-normal granary," a policy under which the government buys and stores agricultural surpluses during periods of low agricultural prices and sells those surpluses during periods of high agricultural prices.
The term "ever-normal granary" itself was adopted from a Columbia University dissertation on Confucian economic practice that was read by future US Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace around 1926, some time before he came into office.

Magadan

Magadan CityMagadan proper
The Soviet Union presented a fully sanitized version of labor camps in Magadan and Kolyma to their American guests, claiming that all the work was done by volunteers.
Magadan was visited by U.S. Vice-President Henry Wallace in May 1944.

Claude R. Wickard

Wickard, Claude
Wallace left office as Secretary of Agriculture in September 1940, and was succeeded by Undersecretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard.
When Henry A. Wallace resigned as the Secretary of Agriculture in September 1940 to run for Vice-President in the 1940 presidential election, Wickard was appointed to the post.

Board of Economic Warfare

Office of Economic WarfareUS Board of Economic Warfare
Roosevelt named Wallace chairman of the Board of Economic Warfare (BEW) and of the Supply Priorities and Allocation Board (SPAB) in 1941.
Vice President Henry A. Wallace chaired the Economic Defense Board, the Supply Priorities and Allocation Board, and the Board of Economic Warfare as a member of President Roosevelt's secret "war cabinet".

Great Depression in the United States

Great DepressionDepressionthe Depression
His uncle lost ownership of the paper in 1932 due to the effects of the Great Depression, and Wallace stopped serving as editor of the paper in 1933.
With support from Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace and Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau, Jr, popular support for recovery, rather than reform, swept the nation.