Henry A. Wallace

Henry WallaceWallaceHenry Agard WallaceWallace, Henry A.Wallace for PresidentWallace presidential campaign[Henry] Wallace
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) served as the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–1945), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–1940), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–1946).wikipedia
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1948 United States presidential election

19481948 presidential election1948 election
He was the presidential nominee of the revived Progressive Party in the 1948 presidential election.
Truman also faced a challenge from the left in the form of former Vice President Henry A. Wallace, who launched the Progressive Party and challenged Truman's confrontational Cold War policies.

Henry Cantwell Wallace

Henry C. WallaceHenry WallaceHarry Wallace
The son of Secretary of Agriculture Henry Cantwell Wallace, Henry A. Wallace was born in Adair County, Iowa.
He was the father of Henry A. Wallace, who would follow in his footsteps as Secretary of Agriculture and later became Vice President under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1940 United States presidential election

19401940 presidential election1940 election
Roosevelt and Wallace won the 1940 election, and Wallace became Vice President.
The 1940 Democratic National Convention re-nominated Roosevelt on the first ballot, while Garner was replaced on the ticket by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace.

1940 Democratic National Convention

1940Democratic National Conventionthe Democratic convention
The selection of ex-Republican, non-politician Wallace upset many delegates at the 1940 Democratic National Convention; Wallace was nominated only after Roosevelt threatened to decline the presidential nomination.
Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace from Iowa was nominated for Vice President.

The New Republic

New RepublicThe New Republic Anthology: 1915-1935The New Republic's
Wallace became the editor of The New Republic and emerged as a prominent critic of Truman's foreign policies.
It changed its position with the start of the Cold War in 1947, and the 1948 departure of leftist editor Henry A. Wallace to run for president on the Progressive ticket.

Ilo Wallace

Ilo BrowneIlo Browne Wallace
In 1914, Wallace married Ilo Browne, and in 1926, with the help of a small inheritance that had been left to her, he founded the Hi-Bred Corn Company, which made him a wealthy man.
Ilo Browne Wallace (March 10, 1888 – February 22, 1981) was the wife of Henry A. Wallace, the 33rd U.S Vice President and later Secretary of Commerce.

Farm Progress

Prairie Farmer
After earning a degree in animal husbandry from Iowa State University, Wallace worked as a farmer and as a newspaper editor for his family's farm journal, Wallaces Farmer.
Three generations of the Wallace family; Henry Cantwell Wallace, Henry A. Wallace, and Henry Browne Wallace, owned and operated Wallaces' Farmer, which was then a newspaper.

New Deal

the New DealFirst 100 DaysNew Deal art
He strongly supported New Deal liberalism and sought conciliation with the Soviet Union.
The rural U.S. was a high priority for Roosevelt and his energetic Secretary of Agriculture, Henry A. Wallace.

Strom Thurmond

James Strom ThurmondThurmondJ. Strom Thurmond
Wallace received 2.4% of the popular vote, and Truman prevailed over Wallace, Republican Thomas E. Dewey, and Dixiecrat Strom Thurmond.
Thurmond stated that Truman, Thomas Dewey and Henry A. Wallace would lead the U.S. to totalitarianism.

John Nance Garner

John N. GarnerGarnerJohn Garner
Vice President John Nance Garner had broken with Roosevelt, so Roosevelt selected Wallace as his running mate in his bid for an unprecedented third term.
Garner was replaced as vice president by Henry A. Wallace and retired from public office in 1941.

DuPont Pioneer

PioneerDuPontHi-Bred Corn Company
He founded the Hi-Bred Corn Company, which was very successful and made Wallace wealthy.
In 1926, farm journal editor and future U.S. Vice President Henry A. Wallace, along with a group of Des Moines, Iowa businessmen, founded the "Hi-Bred Corn Company".

United States Secretary of Agriculture

Secretary of AgricultureU.S. Secretary of AgricultureSecretary
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) served as the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–1945), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–1940), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–1946).

Franklin D. Roosevelt

RooseveltFranklin RooseveltPresident Roosevelt
In 1933 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Wallace as his Secretary of Agriculture.
Harold L. Ickes and Henry A. Wallace, two progressive Republicans, were selected for the roles of Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Agriculture, respectively.

Harry S. Truman

TrumanHarry TrumanPresident Truman
They persuaded Roosevelt to replace Wallace with Harry S. Truman.
Vice President Henry Wallace was popular among Democratic voters, but he was viewed as too far to the left and too friendly to labor for some of Roosevelt's advisers.

George Washington Carver

CarverG. W. CarverG. Washington Carver
When the African-American "plant doctor" and future agronomist George Washington Carver became a student and later an instructor at Iowa State University, the Wallaces took him into their home, as racial prejudice prevented Carver from living in the dormitories.
He knew Carver personally because his son Henry A. Wallace and the researcher were friends.

Orient, Iowa

Orient
Henry Agard was born on October 7, 1888, at a farm near the village of Orient, Iowa, in Adair County; the family later moved to Des Moines.
U.S. Vice President Henry A. Wallace (1941–45) was born on a farm near Orient in 1888.

Magadan

Magadan CityMagadan properRF Magadan
Coming from Alaska, they landed at Magadan, where they were received by Sergo Goglidze and Dalstroi director Ivan Nikishov, both NKVD generals.
Magadan was visited by U.S. Vice-President Henry Wallace in May 1944.

Great Depression

Depressionthe Great DepressionDepression-era
Not a religious book, The Glory Road was a historical-political allegory inspired by the economic devastation wrought by the Great Depression.
Two economists of the 1920s, Waddill Catchings and William Trufant Foster, popularized a theory that influenced many policy makers, including Herbert Hoover, Henry A. Wallace, Paul Douglas, and Marriner Eccles.

Buffer stock scheme

ever-normal granarybuffer stockintervention stores
As Agriculture Secretary, Wallace sought to raise farm prices and supported the ever-normal granary concept.
The term "ever-normal granary" itself was adopted from a Columbia University dissertation on Confucian economic practice that was read by future US Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace around 1926, some time before he came into office.

Progressive Party (United States, 1948)

Progressive PartyProgressive1948 Progressive Party
He was the presidential nominee of the revived Progressive Party in the 1948 presidential election.
The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a left-wing political party that served as a vehicle for former Vice President Henry A. Wallace's 1948 presidential campaign.

United States Secretary of Commerce

Secretary of CommerceU.S. Secretary of CommerceCommerce Secretary
Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) served as the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–1945), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–1940), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–1946).

Board of Economic Warfare

Office of Economic Warfare
Roosevelt named Wallace chairman of the Board of Economic Warfare (BEW) and of the Supply Priorities and Allocation Board (SPAB) in 1941.
Vice President Henry A. Wallace chaired the Economic Defense Board, the Supply Priorities and Allocation Board, and the Board of Economic Warfare as a member of President Roosevelt's secret "war cabinet".

Thomas E. Dewey

DeweyThomas DeweyGovernor Dewey
Wallace received 2.4% of the popular vote, and Truman prevailed over Wallace, Republican Thomas E. Dewey, and Dixiecrat Strom Thurmond.
Indeed, given Truman's sinking popularity and the Democratic Party's three-way split (between Truman, Henry A. Wallace, and Strom Thurmond), Dewey had seemed unstoppable.

Nicholas Roerich

RoerichNicholasInternational Roerich Centre
Starting in the 1920s, he explored various religions, becoming interested in theosophy and befriending figures such as George William Russell and Nicholas Roerich.
In 1934–1935, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (then headed by Roerich admirer Henry A. Wallace) sponsored an expedition by Roerich and USDA scientists H. G. MacMillan and James F. Stephens to Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, and China.

Irish Agricultural Organisation Society

One of the people with whom Wallace corresponded was the Irish poet, artist, and theosophist George William Russell, also known as Æ, who was editor of the Irish Homestead, the weekly publication of the Irish Agricultural Organisation Society (IAOS).
The IAOS attracted numerous notable employees and members, including Thomas Westropp Bennett, George William Russell ("AE"), Denis O'Donnell, Henry A. Wallace and Francis O'Brien, father of Conor Cruise O'Brien.