Henry Brant

Henry Dreyfuss Brant (September 15, 1913 – April 26, 2008) was a Canadian-born American composer.wikipedia
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Alex North

North
As well as producing works for the concert hall, Brant worked as an orchestrator for many Hollywood productions, including the Elizabeth Taylor movie Cleopatra (1963), one of many collaborations with composer Alex North.
North's frequent collaborator as orchestrator was the avant-garde composer Henry Brant.

Spatial music

spatializationaudio spatializationspatialisation
An expert orchestrator with a flair for experimentation, many of Brant's works featured spatialization techniques.
Notable 20th-century spatial compositions include Charles Ives's Fourth Symphony (1912–18), Rued Langgaard's Music of the Spheres (1916–18), Edgard Varèse's Poème électronique (Expo '58), Henryk Górecki's Scontri, op. 17 (1960), which unleashes a volume of sound with a "tremendous orchestra" for which the composer precisely dictates the placement of each player onstage, including fifty-two percussion instruments, Karlheinz Stockhausen's Helicopter String Quartet (1992–93/95), which is "arguably the most extreme experiment involving the spatial motility of live performers", and Henry Brant's Ice Field, a "'spatial narrative,'" or "spatial organ concerto," awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Music, as well as most of the output after 1960 of Luigi Nono, whose late works—e.g., ..... sofferte onde serene ... (1976), Al gran sole carico d'amore (1972–77), Prometeo (1984), and A Pierre: Dell’azzurro silenzio, inquietuum (1985)—explicitly reflect the spatial soundscape of his native Venice, and cannot be performed without their spatial component.

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks Sr.Gordon Alexander Buchanan ParksThe Gordon Parks Foundation
Other composers whom he assisted as orchestrator included Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, George Antheil, Douglas Moore, and Gordon Parks.
Parks also wrote the screenplay and composed the musical score for the film, with assistance from his friend, the composer Henry Brant.

Henry Cowell

Cowell, HenryCowellHenry
As a 19-year-old, Brant was the youngest composer included in Henry Cowell's landmark book from 1933, American Composers on American Music; and Cowell realized that Brant had already demonstrated an early identification with the American experimental musical tradition.
Its next concert, in April 1930, focused on the U.S. ultra-modernists, with works by Cowell, Crawford, Ives, Rudhyar, and others such as Antheil, Henry Brant, and Vivian Fine.

Bennington College

BenningtonBennington College GalleryBennington College Theater
Starting in the late 1940s, he taught at Columbia University, the Juilliard School and, for 24 years, Bennington College.
Faculty has included Wharton and James biographer R. W. B. Lewis, essayist Edward Hoagland, literary critics Camille Paglia and Stanley Hyman (whose wife Shirley Jackson referenced Bennington College in her writing, particularly Hangsaman), rhetorician Kenneth Burke, former United Artists' senior vice-president Steven Bach, novelists Arturo Vivante, Bernard Malamud and John Gardner, trumpeter/composer Bill Dixon, composers Allen Shawn, Henry Brant, and Vivian Fine, painters Kenneth Noland, Mary Lum and Jules Olitski, politicians Mansour Farhang and Mac Maharaj, poets Léonie Adams and Howard Nemerov, sculptor Anthony Caro, dancer/choreographer Martha Graham, drummer Milford Graves, author William Butler (author of The Butterfly Revolution), economist Karl Polanyi and a number of Pulitzer Prize-winning and acclaimed poets including W. H. Auden, Stanley Kunitz, Mary Oliver, Theodore Roethke, Donald Hall, and Anne Waldman.

Ice Field

Brant won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 2002 for his composition Ice Field.
Ice Field is a musical composition by Henry Brant, for large orchestral groups and organ, commissioned by Other Minds for a December 2001 premiere by the San Francisco Symphony.

George Antheil

AntheilAntheil, GeorgeGeorge Anthei
Other composers whom he assisted as orchestrator included Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, George Antheil, Douglas Moore, and Gordon Parks.
His legacy included three accomplished students, Henry Brant, Benjamin Lees, and Ruth White.

The Unanswered Question

Charles Ives work
Brant's work as an orchestrator was not limited to film and stage: his long-term affinity for the music of Charles Ives — whose The Unanswered Question was an acknowledged inspiration for Brant's spatial music — was ultimately found in the premier of Brant's arrangement of Ives' Second Piano Sonata, "Concord, Mass 1840–60" as A Concord Symphony in 1996.
Ives use of separate groups of instruments placed apart on the stage and playing in independent tempos influenced the work of American composer Henry Brant.

San Francisco Symphony

San FranciscoSan Francisco Symphony OrchestraSan Francisco Symphony Orchestra & Chorus
A Concord Symphony was recorded by the San Francisco Symphony on its SFS Media label. Ice Field, for large orchestral groups and organ, was commissioned by Other Minds for a December 2001 premiere by the San Francisco Symphony.
In 2001, the San Francisco Symphony gave the world premiere of Henry Brant's Ice Field, which later won that year's Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Gamelan

gamelan musickarawitanJavanese gamelan
In keeping with Brant's belief that music can be as complex and contradictory as everyday life, his larger works often employ multiple, contrasting performing forces, as in Meteor Farm (1982) for symphony orchestra, large jazz band, two choruses, West African drum ensemble and chorus, South Indian soloists, large Javanese Gamelan ensemble, percussion orchestra and two Western solo sopranos.
In more recent times, American composers such as Henry Brant, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Dennis Murphy, Loren Nerell, Michael Tenzer, Evan Ziporyn, Daniel James Wolf and Jody Diamond as well as Australian composers such as Peter Sculthorpe, Andrew Schultz and Ross Edwards have written several works with parts for gamelan instruments or full gamelan ensembles.

Piano Sonata No. 2 (Ives)

Concord SonataPiano Sonata No. 2Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840–60
Brant's work as an orchestrator was not limited to film and stage: his long-term affinity for the music of Charles Ives — whose The Unanswered Question was an acknowledged inspiration for Brant's spatial music — was ultimately found in the premier of Brant's arrangement of Ives' Second Piano Sonata, "Concord, Mass 1840–60" as A Concord Symphony in 1996.
In 1996 the work, retitled A Concord Symphony has been transcribed for orchestra by Henry Brant.

Pulitzer Prize for Music

MusicPulitzer PrizePulitzer
Brant won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 2002 for his composition Ice Field.
2002: Henry Brant, Ice Field

Other Minds (organization)

Other MindsOther Minds Festival
Ice Field, for large orchestral groups and organ, was commissioned by Other Minds for a December 2001 premiere by the San Francisco Symphony.
Composers represented in the annual festival have included such artists as Meredith Monk, Muhal Richard Abrams, Terry Riley, Philip Glass, Frederic Rzewski, Margaret Leng Tan, Henry Brant, Conlon Nancarrow, Robert Ashley, Pauline Oliveros, Lou Harrison, Laurie Anderson, LaMonte Young, Leroy Jenkins, Janice Giteck, Kyle Gann, Olly Wilson, William Parker, Gavin Bryars, Michael Nyman, Brian Eno and many others.

Flute concerto

concerto for flute soloflute
Ghosts & Gargoyles, a concerto for flute solo with flute orchestra, for New Music Concerts, Toronto had its premiere on May 26, 2002.
Henry Brant

Paul Fromm (philanthropist)

Paul FrommFromm Music FoundationFromm
Among other honors were Ford Foundation, Fromm Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and Koussevitzky awards and the American Music Center's Letter of Distinction.
During the period 1984-89, Earle Brown, then president of the Fromm Music Foundation, recommended many American composers for commissions including Daniel Asia, David Lang, William Susman, Henry Brant and Steve Reich.

Montreal

Montreal, QuebecMontréalMontreal, Canada
Brant was born in Montreal, to American parents (his father was a violinist), in 1913.

Schulich School of Music

McGill Music ConservatoryCIRMMTFaculty of Music
Something of a child prodigy, he began composing at the age of eight, and studied first at the McGill Conservatorium (1926–29) and then in New York City (1929–34).

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Something of a child prodigy, he began composing at the age of eight, and studied first at the McGill Conservatorium (1926–29) and then in New York City (1929–34).

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeColumbia University President
Starting in the late 1940s, he taught at Columbia University, the Juilliard School and, for 24 years, Bennington College.

Juilliard School

JuilliardJuilliard School of MusicThe Juilliard School
Starting in the late 1940s, he taught at Columbia University, the Juilliard School and, for 24 years, Bennington College.

Elizabeth Taylor

Liz TaylorDame Elizabeth TaylorTaylor
As well as producing works for the concert hall, Brant worked as an orchestrator for many Hollywood productions, including the Elizabeth Taylor movie Cleopatra (1963), one of many collaborations with composer Alex North.

Cleopatra (1963 film)

CleopatraCleopatra (1963)1963
As well as producing works for the concert hall, Brant worked as an orchestrator for many Hollywood productions, including the Elizabeth Taylor movie Cleopatra (1963), one of many collaborations with composer Alex North.

Virgil Thomson

ThomsonThomson, VirgilVirgil
Other composers whom he assisted as orchestrator included Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, George Antheil, Douglas Moore, and Gordon Parks.

Aaron Copland

CoplandCopland, AaronAaron
Other composers whom he assisted as orchestrator included Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, George Antheil, Douglas Moore, and Gordon Parks.

Douglas Moore

MooreMoore, Douglas
Other composers whom he assisted as orchestrator included Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, George Antheil, Douglas Moore, and Gordon Parks.