Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henrylawyer and politician of the same name
Henry Clay Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives, served as seventh speaker of the U.S.wikipedia
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1832 United States presidential election

18321832 presidential election1832 election
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.
It saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, defeat Henry Clay, candidate of the National Republican Party.

1844 United States presidential election

18441844 presidential election1844 election
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.
Democrat James K. Polk defeated Whig Henry Clay in a close contest turning on the controversial issues of slavery and the annexation of the Republic of Texas.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.
Other influential party leaders include Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, William Seward, John J. Crittenden, and Truman Smith.

1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 election
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.
Senator Andrew Jackson, House Speaker Henry Clay, and Secretary of State Adams all joined Crawford in seeking the presidency, highlighting factionalism within the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
Despite receiving support from Clay and other National Republicans, Adams was defeated by Democrat Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election.
In reaction to the alleged "corrupt bargain" between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson's supporters founded the Democratic Party.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections and helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party.
Known initially as "Adams-Clay Republicans" in the wake of the 1824 campaign, Adams's political allies in Congress and at the state-level were referred to as "Adams's Men" during his presidency (1825–1829).

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
Clay finished with the fourth-most electoral votes in the multi-candidate 1824 presidential election, and he helped John Quincy Adams win the contingent election held to select the president.
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.

Hanover County, Virginia

Hanover CountyHanoverHanover Counties
Clay was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1777 and launched a legal career in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1797.
Hanover County was also the birthplace of Henry Clay, who became known as a politician in Kentucky, author of the Missouri Compromise of 1820, and Secretary of State.

James K. Polk

James PolkJames Knox PolkPolk
Clay resigned from the Senate in 1842 and won the 1844 Whig presidential nomination, but he was defeated in the general election by Democrat James K. Polk, who made the annexation of the Republic of Texas his key issue.
In the general election, Polk defeated Henry Clay of the rival Whig Party.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Despite receiving support from Clay and other National Republicans, Adams was defeated by Democrat Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election.
Opposing factions led by Henry Clay helped form the Whig Party.

War of 1812

The War of 1812American War of 1812war
He was chosen as speaker of the House in early 1811 and, along with President James Madison, led the United States into the War of 1812 against Britain.
Even major figures such as Henry Clay and James Monroe expected to keep at least Upper Canada in the event of an easy conquest.

Tariff of 1833

Compromise TariffCompromise Tariff of 18331833 compromise tariff
After the 1832 election, Clay helped bring an end to the Nullification Crisis by leading passage of the Tariff of 1833.
55, ), enacted on March 2, 1833, was proposed by Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun as a resolution to the Nullification Crisis.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Henry Clay Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives, served as seventh speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and served as the ninth U.S. secretary of state.
As a result, four senators who failed to meet the age requirement were nevertheless admitted to the Senate: Henry Clay (aged 29 in 1806), John Jordan Crittenden (aged 29 in 1817), Armistead Thomson Mason (aged 28 in 1816), and John Eaton (aged 28 in 1818).

Lexington, Kentucky

LexingtonLexington, KYLexington-Fayette
Clay was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1777 and launched a legal career in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1797.
Many of 19th-century America's leading political and military figures spent part of their lives in the city, including U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis (who attended Transylvania University in 1823 and 1824); Confederate general John Hunt Morgan; U.S. Senator and Vice President John C. Breckinridge; and Speaker of the House, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of State Henry Clay, who had a plantation nearby.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Speaker of the HouseSpeaker of the House of RepresentativesSpeaker
Henry Clay Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives, served as seventh speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and served as the ninth U.S. secretary of state.
A partisan position from early in its existence, the speakership began to gain power in legislative development under Henry Clay (1811–1814, 1815–1820, and 1823–1825).

1828 United States presidential election

18281828 presidential election1828 election
Despite receiving support from Clay and other National Republicans, Adams was defeated by Democrat Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election.
However, with the open support of House Speaker Henry Clay, Adams won the subsequent contingent election in the House of Representatives under the Twelfth Amendment.

1848 United States presidential election

18481848 presidential election1848 election
Clay strongly criticized the subsequent Mexican–American War and sought the Whig presidential nomination in 1848, but was defeated by General Zachary Taylor.
Despite Taylor's unclear political affiliations and beliefs, and the Whig opposition to the Mexican–American War, the 1848 Whig National Convention nominated the popular general over party stalwarts such as Henry Clay and Daniel Webster.

1840 United States presidential election

18401840 presidential election1840 election
Clay sought the presidency in the 1840 election but was defeated at the Whig National Convention by William Henry Harrison.
The 1839 Whig National Convention saw 1836 nominee William Henry Harrison defeat former Secretary of State Henry Clay and General Winfield Scott.

Zachary Taylor

TaylorPresident TaylorGeneral Zachary Taylor
Clay strongly criticized the subsequent Mexican–American War and sought the Whig presidential nomination in 1848, but was defeated by General Zachary Taylor.
At the 1848 Whig National Convention, Taylor defeated Scott and former Senator Henry Clay to take the nomination.

Tariff in United States history

tariffstariffTariffs in United States history
After the war, Clay returned to his position as speaker of the House and developed the American System, which called for federal infrastructure investments, support for the national bank, and protective tariff rates.
In the 19th century, statesmen such as Senator Henry Clay continued Hamilton's themes within the Whig Party under the name "American System

Compromise of 1850

compromise billCompromise Measures of 1850Crisis of 1850
After returning to the Senate in 1849, Clay played a key role in passing the Compromise of 1850, which resolved a crisis over the status of slavery in the territories.
The compromise was brokered by Whig senator Henry Clay and Democratic senator Stephen Douglas with the support of President Millard Fillmore.

American System (economic plan)

American SystemAmerican System economic planAmerican System of internal improvements
After the war, Clay returned to his position as speaker of the House and developed the American System, which called for federal infrastructure investments, support for the national bank, and protective tariff rates.
Congressman Henry Clay was the plan's foremost proponent and the first to refer to it as the "American System".

George Wythe

WytheWythe, George
Clay adapted well to his new role, and his handwriting earned him the attention of William & Mary professor George Wythe, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, mentor of Thomas Jefferson, and judge on Virginia's High Court of Chancery.
Wythe taught and was a mentor to Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and other men who became American leaders.

Missouri Compromise

Missouri Compromise of 1820Compromise of 1820Missouri Crisis
In 1820, he helped bring an end to a sectional crisis over slavery by leading the passage of the Missouri Compromise.
Speaker of the House Henry Clay of Kentucky, in a desperate bid to break the deadlock, divided the Senate bills.

Cassius Marcellus Clay (politician)

Cassius Marcellus ClayCassius M. ClayCassius Clay
Clay was a distant cousin of Cassius Clay, a prominent anti-slavery activist active in the mid-19th century.
They were cousins of both Kentucky politician Henry Clay and Alabama governor Clement Comer Clay.