Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon

Lord CarnarvonThe Earl of CarnarvonEarl of CarnarvonCarnarvon4th Earl of Carnarvonthe 4th earl of CarnarvonHenry HerbertHenry Howard Molyneux Herbert The Right Honourable Henry Herbert 4th '''Earl of Carnarvon''' PC 4th Earl
Henry Howard Molyneux Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon, (24 June 1831 – 29 June 1890), known as Lord Porchester from 1833 to 1849, was a British politician and a leading member of the Conservative Party.wikipedia
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Auberon Herbert

Auberon Edward William Molyneux HerbertAuberon Edward William Molyneux Howard Herberthis great-uncle
Auberon Herbert was his younger brother.
He was the third son of the 3rd Earl of Carnarvon, and brother of Henry Herbert, the 4th Earl.

Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies

Permanent Under-Secretary of State for the ColoniesMinister of State for the ColoniesMinister of State for Colonial Affairs
He served under Lord Derby, as Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1858 to 1859, aged twenty-six.

Secretary of State for the Colonies

Colonial SecretaryColonial OfficeBritish Secretary of State for the Colonies
He was twice Secretary of State for the Colonies and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Carnarvon Terms

Returning to the office of the British colonial secretary in 1874, he submitted a set of proposals, the Carnarvon terms, to settle the dispute between British Columbia and Canada over the construction of the transcontinental railroad and the Vancouver Island railroad and train bridge.
The Carnarvon Terms were a set of proposals ordered by the British colonial secretary Lord Carnarvon in 1874 to settle the dispute between British Columbia and Canada over the construction of the transcontinental railroad and the Vancouver Island railroad and train bridge.

Anglo-Zulu War

Zulu WarAnglo–Zulu WarZulu Wars
Of the resultant wars, the disastrous invasion of Zululand ended in annexation, but the first Anglo-Boer War of 1880 had even more far-reaching consequences for the subcontinent.
Following Lord Carnarvon's successful introduction of federation in Canada, it was thought that similar political effort, coupled with military campaigns, might succeed with the African kingdoms, tribal areas and Boer republics in South Africa.

Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury

Lord SalisburyThe Marquess of SalisburyMarquess of Salisbury
Later that year, he resigned (along with Lord Cranborne and Jonathan Peel) in protest against Benjamin Disraeli's Reform Bill to enfranchise the working classes.
Cranborne studied Baxter's statistics and on 21 February he met Lord Carnarvon, who wrote in his diary: "He is firmly convinced now that Disraeli has played us false, that he is attempting to hustle us into his measure, that Lord Derby is in his hands and that the present form which the question has now assumed has been long planned by him".

Oxford "-er"

coddersknown colloquially as "Divvers"Oxford
He attended Christ Church, Oxford, where his nickname was "Twitters", apparently on account of his nervous tics and twitchy behaviour, and where in 1852 he obtained a first in literae humaniores.

Henry Herbert, 3rd Earl of Carnarvon

Henry John George Herbert, 3rd Earl of Carnarvon3rd Earl of CarnarvonViscount Porchester
Born at Grosvenor Square, London, Carnarvon was the eldest son and heir of Henry Herbert, 3rd Earl of Carnarvon (d.1849), by his wife Henrietta Anna Howard, a daughter of Lord Henry Howard-Molyneux-Howard, younger brother of Bernard Howard, 12th Duke of Norfolk.
He died at Pusey, Oxfordshire in December 1849, aged 49, and was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon.

First Boer War

First Anglo-Boer WarFirstTransvaal War
Of the resultant wars, the disastrous invasion of Zululand ended in annexation, but the first Anglo-Boer War of 1880 had even more far-reaching consequences for the subcontinent.
In 1875 the Earl of Carnarvon, the British Colonial Secretary, in an attempt to extend British influence, approached the Orange Free State and the Transvaal Republic and tried to organise a federation of the British and Boer territories modelled on the 1867 federation of the French and English provinces of Canada.

Henry Bartle Frere

Bartle FrereSir Bartle FrereSir Henry Bartle Frere
He sent administrators, such as Theophilus Shepstone and Bartle Frere, to southern Africa to implement his system of confederation.
In 1877, Frere was made High Commissioner for Southern Africa by the London-based Secretary for the Colonies Lord Carnarvon, who continued to support the imposition of the unpopular system of confederation upon the southern Africa region.

Henry Barkly

Sir Henry BarklyBarklyBarkly, Sir Henry
The liberal Cape government also objected to the plan for ideological concerns; Its formal response, conveyed to London via Sir Henry Barkly, had been that any federation with the illiberal Boer republics would compromise the rights and franchise of the Cape's Black citizens, and was therefore unacceptable.
He was also influential in supporting the local resistance against Carnarvon's attempt to force the region into a British ruled federation.

Francis Reginald Statham

Francis Statham
Francis Reginald Statham, editor of The Natal Witness in the 1870s, famously summed up the local reaction to Carnarvon's plan for the region:
The imperial policy under Lord Carnarvon was to enforce a system of confederation onto the states of southern Africa, bringing them together under British rule and preempting a feared "general and simultaneous rising of Kaffirdom against white civilization".

Theophilus Shepstone

Sir Theophilus ShepstoneLord Shepstone
He sent administrators, such as Theophilus Shepstone and Bartle Frere, to southern Africa to implement his system of confederation.
When in London in 1876 Shepstone was entrusted by the 4th earl of Carnarvon, then secretary of state for the colonies, with a special commission to confer with the Transvaal executive on the question of the federation of the South African states, and given power, should he deem it necessary, to annexe the country, subject to the confirmation of the British government.

George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon

Lord Carnarvon5th Earl of Carnarvon5th Earl
Styled Lord Porchester from birth, he was born at the family seat, Highclere Castle, in Hampshire, the only son of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon, a distinguished Tory statesman, by his first wife Lady Evelyn Stanhope, daughter of Anne and George Stanhope, 6th Earl of Chesterfield.

Aubrey Herbert

Waugh's father-in-lawAubrey Nigel Henry Molyneux HerbertColonel The Hon. Aubrey Herbert
Aubrey Herbert was born at Highclere Castle in Hampshire, the second son of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon, a wealthy landowner, British cabinet minister, and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Society of Antiquaries of London

Society of AntiquariesFSAFellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London
He was regarded as a highly cultured man and was a president and a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (his time there noted for their campaign to save St Albans Cathedral from Lord Grimthorpe) and a Fellow of the Royal Society as well as was high steward of Oxford University.

Esmé Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Penrith

Esme HowardEsme Howard, 1st Baron Howard of PenrithEsme William Howard
In 1885, he passed the Diplomatic Service examination, and was assistant private secretary to the Earl of Carnarvon as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland before being attached to the British Embassy in Rome.

Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire

HampshireLord-Lieutenancy of HampshireLord-Lieutenant of Hampshire
Carnarvon also held the honorary posts of Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire between 1887 and 1890 and Deputy Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire.

Pixton Park

Pixton
The present grade II* listed Georgian mansion house was built circa 1760 by the Acland family and in 1870 was altered by Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon (1831–1890).

Mervyn Herbert

Mervyn Robert Howard Molyneux HerbertThe Hon. Mervyn Herbert
Herbert was born at Highclere Castle in Hampshire, the third son of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon, a wealthy landowner, British cabinet minister, and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Anne Stanhope, Countess of Chesterfield

Anne StanhopeAnneAnne Elizabeth, Dowager Countess of Chesterfield
They had one son and a daughter, Lady Evelyn Stanhope (1834–1875), later the first wife of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon.

Evelyn Gardner

Evelyn Florence Margaret Winifred Gardner
Her maternal grandparents were Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon and Lady Evelyn Stanhope, a daughter of George Stanhope, 6th Earl of Chesterfield.

Portofino

Portofino, Italy
*1874–1881: Villa Altachiara ("Highclere" in Italian) (Villa Carnarvon) in Portofino, Liguria.

Herbert Gardner, 1st Baron Burghclere

Herbert GardnerBaron BurghclereLord Burghclere
On 4 March 1890, Lord Burghclere married Lady Winifred Anne Henrietta Christiana, daughter of Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon and Lady Evelyn Stanhope (a daughter of George Stanhope, 6th Earl of Chesterfield and Anne Stanhope, Countess of Chesterfield).