Henry II, Duke of Bavaria

Henry II of BavariaHenry the WranglerHenry IIHenry the QuarrelsomeHenry II the QuarrelsomeHeinrich der ZänkerHenry II the WranglerDuke Henry II of BavariaHeinrich II, Duke of BavariaHenry
Henry II (951 – 28 August 995), called the Wrangler or the Quarrelsome (Heinrich der Zänker), a member of the German royal Ottonian dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria from 955 to 976 and again from 985 to 995, as well as Duke of Carinthia from 989 to 995.wikipedia
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List of rulers of Bavaria

Duke of BavariaElector of BavariaBavaria
Henry II (951 – 28 August 995), called the Wrangler or the Quarrelsome (Heinrich der Zänker), a member of the German royal Ottonian dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria from 955 to 976 and again from 985 to 995, as well as Duke of Carinthia from 989 to 995.

Duchy of Carinthia

CarinthiaCarinthianDuke of Carinthia
Henry II (951 – 28 August 995), called the Wrangler or the Quarrelsome (Heinrich der Zänker), a member of the German royal Ottonian dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria from 955 to 976 and again from 985 to 995, as well as Duke of Carinthia from 989 to 995. He severed the Duchy of Carinthia and the Margraviate of Austria from the Bavarian lands and enfeoffed them to his supporters Henry the Younger (who changed sides shortly afterwards) and Leopold of Babenberg.
Duke Henry's son Henry II "the Quarreller" from 974 onwards, revolted against his cousin Emperor Otto II, whereupon he was deposed as Duke of Bavaria in favour of Otto's nephew Duke Otto I of Swabia.

Gisela of Burgundy

GiselaGisela of Bavaria
In 972 Henry married Princess Gisela of Burgundy, herself a niece of Empress Adelaide.
955 – 21 July 1007), a member of the royal Elder House of Welf, was Duchess of Bavaria from about 972 to 976 and again from 985 to 995, by her marriage with Duke Henry the Wrangler.

Judith, Duchess of Bavaria

Judith
He was the son of Duke Henry I of Bavaria, younger brother of King Otto I of Germany (Emperor from 962), and his wife Judith.
After her husband's death, she acted as regent of Bavaria during the minority of her son Henry the Wrangler.

Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor

Otto IIEmperor Otto IIHoly Roman Emperor Otto II
He installed his cousin Henry as Bishop of Augsburg, denying the investiture rights of Emperor Otto's son and successor Otto II.
To ensure domestic tranquillity, Otto II, on June 27, 973, granted his cousin, Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, control over the imperial castles in Bamberg and Stegaurach.

Ottonian dynasty

OttonianOttoniansLiudolfing
Henry II (951 – 28 August 995), called the Wrangler or the Quarrelsome (Heinrich der Zänker), a member of the German royal Ottonian dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria from 955 to 976 and again from 985 to 995, as well as Duke of Carinthia from 989 to 995.
The childless Otto III was succeeded by Henry II, a son of Duke Henry II of Bavaria and his wife Gisela of Burgundy, thereby a member of the Bavarian line of the Ottonians.

Boleslaus II, Duke of Bohemia

Boleslaus II of BohemiaBoleslaus IIBoleslaus II the Pious
With support of his sister Hadwig, he forged alliances with Bavarian and Saxon nobles, and also with Duke Boleslaus II of Bohemia and Duke Mieszko I of Poland.
In 974 he and Duke Mieszko I of Poland supported the rebellious Duke Henry II of Bavaria in his civil war against the rule of Emperor Otto II.

Otto I, Duke of Swabia and Bavaria

Otto IOttoOtto of Swabia
However, Otto II enfeoffed his nephew Otto of Swabia; against the tenacious opposition of Burchard's widow Hadwig.
In 976 the imprisoned Duke Henry the Wrangler of Bavaria was formally dismissed from office for rebellion.

Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor

Otto IOtto the GreatEmperor Otto I
He was the son of Duke Henry I of Bavaria, younger brother of King Otto I of Germany (Emperor from 962), and his wife Judith.
With Henry's death, Otto appointed his four-year-old nephew Henry II, to succeed his father as duke, with his mother Judith of Bavaria as his regent.

Henry I, Duke of Bavaria

Henry IHenry I of BavariaHenry
He was the son of Duke Henry I of Bavaria, younger brother of King Otto I of Germany (Emperor from 962), and his wife Judith.
His son and heir was Henry II, Duke of Bavaria.

Duchy of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianDukes of Bavaria
Upon Emperor Otto's death in 973, Henry could rely on his ties to the South German duchies of Swabia and Bavaria as well as to the adjacent Kingdom of Burgundy.
Although ruled by the Ottonian descendants of Henry I, a cadet branch of the Saxon royal dynasty, the conflict of the Bavarian dukes with the German (from 962: Imperial) court continued: in 976, Emperor Otto II deposed his rebellious cousin Duke Henry II of Bavaria and established the Duchy of Carinthia on former Bavarian territory granted to the former Luitpolding Count palatine Henry III, who also became Margrave of Verona. Though Henry II reconciled with Emperor Otto's widow Theophanu in 985 and regained his duchy, the power of the Bavarian dukes was further diminished by the rise of the Franconian House of Babenberg, ruling as Margraves of Austria (Ostarrichi), who became increasingly independent.

Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor

Otto IIIEmperor Otto IIIKing Otto III
He once again tried to usurp the German throne, when he abducted the infant Otto III and, according to the medieval chronicler Thietmar of Merseburg, had himself proclaimed King of the Romans at the graves of Emperor Otto I and King Henry the Fowler in Magdeburg and Quedlinburg.
His cousin Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, initially claimed regency over the young king and attempted to seize the throne for himself in 984.

War of the Three Henries (977–978)

War of the Three Henriesa revolt broke out in BavariaHenry's failed revolt
Following the War of the Three Henries in 977/78, the deposed duke was placed under the custody of Bishop Folcmar of Utrecht.
He attempted at a conciliation with his Ottonian cousin Duke Henry II of Bavaria, however Henry—not for nothing called "the Wrangler"—challenged the Emperor by enthroning his Luitpolding relative Henry I as Bishop of Augsburg in 973 with the aid of Duke Burchard III of Swabia.

Henry III, Duke of Bavaria

Henry the YoungerHenry IIIHenry III the Younger
He severed the Duchy of Carinthia and the Margraviate of Austria from the Bavarian lands and enfeoffed them to his supporters Henry the Younger (who changed sides shortly afterwards) and Leopold of Babenberg.
After he became of age, Henry the Younger waited patiently, though it seemed that Bavaria was ultimately lost for the Luitpoldings, when upon the death of the Ottonian duke Henry I in 955 he was succeeded by his four-year-old son Henry the Wrangler (as Henry II) under the tutelage of his mother Judith.

Leopold I, Margrave of Austria

Leopold ILeopold of BabenbergLeopold I of Austria
He severed the Duchy of Carinthia and the Margraviate of Austria from the Bavarian lands and enfeoffed them to his supporters Henry the Younger (who changed sides shortly afterwards) and Leopold of Babenberg.
After Otto I had defeated the Magyars in the 955 Battle of Lechfeld, he re-established the Bavarian Marcha orientalis (Eastern March) in the conquered territories, placing them under the command of Margrave Burkhard, a brother-in-law of Duchess Judith, consort of Duke Henry II of Bavaria.

Mieszko I of Poland

Mieszko IMieszkoMieszko I, Duke of Poland
With support of his sister Hadwig, he forged alliances with Bavarian and Saxon nobles, and also with Duke Boleslaus II of Bohemia and Duke Mieszko I of Poland.
After the death of Emperor Otto I in 973 Mieszko, like his brother-in-law, Duke Boleslav II of Bohemia, joined the German opposition in support of the attempted imperial succession of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria.

Thietmar of Merseburg

ThietmarThietmar's ChronicleBishop Thietmar of Merseburg
He once again tried to usurp the German throne, when he abducted the infant Otto III and, according to the medieval chronicler Thietmar of Merseburg, had himself proclaimed King of the Romans at the graves of Emperor Otto I and King Henry the Fowler in Magdeburg and Quedlinburg.
At the time of Thietmar's birth, his family sided with the Ottonian duke Henry II of Bavaria ("the Wrangler") in his uprising against his cousin Emperor Otto II.

Henry II, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry IIEmperor Henry IIHenry II of Germany
The son of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, and his wife Gisela of Burgundy, Emperor Henry II was a great-grandson of German king Henry the Fowler and a member of the Bavarian branch of the Ottonian dynasty.

Bruno of Augsburg

BrunoBruno, Bishop of AugsburgBishop Bruno
992–1029) was the son of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria (the Wrangler or Quarrelsome) and Gisela of Burgundy.

Margraviate of Austria

March of AustriaAustriaMargrave of Austria
He severed the Duchy of Carinthia and the Margraviate of Austria from the Bavarian lands and enfeoffed them to his supporters Henry the Younger (who changed sides shortly afterwards) and Leopold of Babenberg.
In 976, during a general restructuring of Bavaria upon the insurrection of Duke Henry II the Wrangler, Otto's son and successor Emperor Otto II had a new marcha orientalis erected on the territory of the former Pannonian march.

Stephen I of Hungary

Stephen ISaint StephenStephen
Géza arranged Stephen's marriage, to Gisela, daughter of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, in or after 995.

Gisela of Hungary

GiselaGiselle of BavariaGisela of Bavaria
Gisela was a daughter of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria and Gisela of Burgundy.

Folcmar (bishop)

FolcmarFolcmar of UtrechtVolkmar
Following the War of the Three Henries in 977/78, the deposed duke was placed under the custody of Bishop Folcmar of Utrecht.
When Otto II's cousin, Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, revolted in a bid to seize the throne, he was defeated, stripped of all his possessions and placed in the custody of bishop Folcmar.

Theophanu

TheophanoEmpress TheophanuEmpress Theophano
Through the agency of Archbishop Willigis of Mainz, Henry in 985 finally submitted to Empress Theophanu and her mother-in-law Adelaide at an Hoftag assembly in Rohr.
Upon the death of Emperor Otto II, Bishop Folcmar of Utrecht released his cousin, the Bavarian duke Henry the Quarrelsome from custody.

Niedermünster, Regensburg

NiedermünsterNiedermünster AbbeyNiedermünster in Regensburg
The treasures of Niedermünster include the Rule of about 990 and the Uta Codex or Evangeliary of about 1025 with its casket of chased gold, commissioned by an abbess of Niedermünster and containing an illumination showing Saint Erhard presiding at Mass. There is also the magnificent cross given by Queen Gisela, daughter of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, and wife of King Stephen I of Hungary, for the tomb of her mother, Duchess Gisela of Bavaria, who was buried here in 1006.