Henry Kissinger

KissingerHenry A. KissingerKissinger, HenryDr. Henry KissingerHenry Alfred KissingerDr Henry KissingerSecretary of State Henry Kissinger[U.S. Secretary of State Henry] Kissingera "green lightDr. H.A. Kissinger
Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.wikipedia
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Détente

detentedetentéDétente policy
During this period, he pioneered the policy of détente with the Soviet Union, orchestrated the opening of relations with the People's Republic of China, engaged in what became known as shuttle diplomacy in the Middle East to end the Yom Kippur War, and negotiated the Paris Peace Accords, ending American involvement in the Vietnam War.
It was the policy of relaxing tensions between Moscow and the West, as promoted by Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger and Leonid Brezhnev, 1969 – 1974.

Yom Kippur War

October War1973 Arab-Israeli War1973 Arab–Israeli War
During this period, he pioneered the policy of détente with the Soviet Union, orchestrated the opening of relations with the People's Republic of China, engaged in what became known as shuttle diplomacy in the Middle East to end the Yom Kippur War, and negotiated the Paris Peace Accords, ending American involvement in the Vietnam War.
Henry Kissinger believed that the regional balance of power hinged on maintaining Israel's military dominance over Arab countries, and that an Arab victory in the region would strengthen Soviet influence.

Paris Peace Accords

Paris Peace TalksParis Peace AccordParis Peace Conference
During this period, he pioneered the policy of détente with the Soviet Union, orchestrated the opening of relations with the People's Republic of China, engaged in what became known as shuttle diplomacy in the Middle East to end the Yom Kippur War, and negotiated the Paris Peace Accords, ending American involvement in the Vietnam War.
The main negotiators of the agreement were United States National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger and North Vietnamese politburo member Lê Đức Thọ; the two men were awarded the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts, although Lê Đức Thọ refused to accept it.

Shuttle diplomacy

shuttleshuttle diplomatic
During this period, he pioneered the policy of détente with the Soviet Union, orchestrated the opening of relations with the People's Republic of China, engaged in what became known as shuttle diplomacy in the Middle East to end the Yom Kippur War, and negotiated the Paris Peace Accords, ending American involvement in the Vietnam War.
The term was first applied to describe the efforts of United States Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, beginning November 5, 1973, which facilitated the cessation of hostilities following the Yom Kippur War.

Gerald Ford

Gerald R. FordFordGerald R. Ford, Jr.
Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.
Rockefeller underwent extended hearings before Congress, which caused embarrassment when it was revealed he made large gifts to senior aides, such as Henry Kissinger.

Geopolitics

geopoliticalgeo-politicalGeopolitically
Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.
Two famous Security Advisors from the cold war period, Henry Kissinger and Zbigniew Brzezinski, argued to continue the United States geopolitical focus on Eurasia and, particularly on Russia, despite the dissolution of the USSR and the end of the Cold War.

Realpolitik

Pragmatismpragmaticpragmatist
A practitioner of Realpolitik, Kissinger played a prominent role in United States foreign policy between 1969 and 1977.
Henry Kissinger has been credited with formally introducing the policy of Realpolitik to the White House as Secretary of State to Richard Nixon.

Richard Nixon

Richard M. NixonNixonPresident Nixon
Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.
The relationship between Nixon and Henry Kissinger, his National Security Advisor was unusually close.

Special Studies Project

From 1956 to 1958 he worked for the Rockefeller Brothers Fund as director of its Special Studies Project.
Nelson recruited Henry Kissinger, who was then on the faculty of Harvard University, as director of the project; he had first met Kissinger in 1955.

1973 Chilean coup d'état

Chilean coup of 1973coup d'état1973 coup d'état
Kissinger has also been associated with such controversial policies as U.S. involvement in the 1973 Chilean military coup, a "green light" to Argentina's military junta for their Dirty War, and U.S. support for Pakistan during the Bangladesh War despite the genocide being perpetrated by his allies.
After a review of recordings of telephone conversations between Nixon and Henry Kissinger, Robert Dallek concluded that both of them used the CIA to actively destabilize the Allende government.

Council on Foreign Relations

The Council on Foreign RelationsCFRCouncil on Foreign Relations (CFR)
During 1955 and 1956, he was also study director in nuclear weapons and foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.
After this speech, the council convened a session on "Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy" and chose Henry Kissinger to head it.

National Security Study Memorandum 200

NSSM 200
As National Security Advisor, in 1974 Kissinger directed the much-debated National Security Study Memorandum 200.
National Security Study Memorandum 200: Implications of Worldwide Population Growth for U.S. Security and Overseas Interests (NSSM200) was completed on December 10, 1974 by the United States National Security Council under the direction of Henry Kissinger.

Krefeld

Krefeld, GermanyCrefeldCity of Krefeld
During the American advance into Germany, Kissinger, only a private, was put in charge of the administration of the city of Krefeld, owing to a lack of German speakers on the division's intelligence staff.
In 1945, the U.S. Army occupied the city and placed Henry Kissinger, then an Army private and later Secretary of State of the United States, in charge of the city administration.

Anatoly Dobrynin

DobryninAnatoli DobryninAnatoliy Dobrynin
One such years-long backchannel was conducted through the Soviet Ambassador to the United States, Anatoly Dobrynin.
Between 1968 and 1974, he was known as the Soviet end of the Kissinger–Dobrynin direct communication and negotiation link between the American presidency and the Soviet politburo.

United States Secretary of State

Secretary of StateU.S. Secretary of StateUS Secretary of State
Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.
Accordingly, the resignations of President Richard Nixon and of Vice President Spiro Agnew were formalized in instruments delivered to Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China

1972 Nixon visit to Chinavisit to China1972 visit to China
His trips paved the way for the groundbreaking 1972 summit between Nixon, Zhou, and Communist Party of China Chairman Mao Zedong, as well as the formalization of relations between the two countries, ending 23 years of diplomatic isolation and mutual hostility.
Early in his first term, Nixon, through his National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger, sent subtle overtures hinting at warmer relations to the PRC government.

Counterintelligence Corps

Counter Intelligence CorpsCICCounter-Intelligence Corps
Kissinger was then reassigned to the Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC), where he became a CIC Special Agent holding the enlisted rank of sergeant.
In some cases CIC agents such as Henry Kissinger found themselves acting as the de facto military government on the occupation of large towns before the arrival of Allied Military Government for Occupied Territories (AMGOT) officers.

Nobel Peace Prize

Nobel PrizePeaceNobel Prize for Peace
For his actions negotiating a ceasefire in Vietnam, Kissinger received the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize under controversial circumstances, with two members of the committee resigning in protest.
The awards given to Mikhail Gorbachev, Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres, Menachem Begin and Yasser Arafat, Lê Đức Thọ, Henry Kissinger, Jimmy Carter, Al Gore, Liu Xiaobo, Barack Obama, and the European Union have all been the subject of controversy.

Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Center for International AffairsHarvard Center for International AffairsWeatherhead Centre for International Affairs
Kissinger remained at Harvard as a member of the faculty in the Department of Government and, with Robert R. Bowie, co-founded the Center for International Affairs in 1958 where he served as associate director.
The aim of the Center is to confront the world's problems as diagnosed by its founders Robert R. Bowie and Henry Kissinger in their specification of The Program of the Center for International Affairs (1958):

Dirty War

Argentine Dirty WarMaria Eugenia Sampallohuman rights abuses
Kissinger has also been associated with such controversial policies as U.S. involvement in the 1973 Chilean military coup, a "green light" to Argentina's military junta for their Dirty War, and U.S. support for Pakistan during the Bangladesh War despite the genocide being perpetrated by his allies.
Although at least six U.S. citizens had been "disappeared" by the Argentine military by 1976, high-ranking state department officials including then Secretary of State Henry Kissinger had secretly backed up Argentina's new military rulers.

Robert R. Bowie

Robert Bowie
Kissinger remained at Harvard as a member of the faculty in the Department of Government and, with Robert R. Bowie, co-founded the Center for International Affairs in 1958 where he served as associate director.
He served as Director of Policy Planning from 1953–1957; co-founder, with Henry Kissinger, of Harvard's Center for International Affairs (1958); Counselor for the State Department from 1966-1968.

Bensheim

SchönbergAuerbachBensheim-Auerbach, Germany
In June 1945, Kissinger was made commandant of the Bensheim metro CIC detachment, Bergstrasse district of Hesse, with responsibility for de-Nazification of the district.
As the U.S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps agent, Henry Kissinger was the most important representative of the occupying power, after the official town commander.

Nelson Rockefeller

Nelson A. RockefellerNelson Aldrich RockefellerNelson
Keen to have a greater influence on U.S. foreign policy, Kissinger became foreign policy advisor to the presidential campaigns of Nelson Rockefeller, supporting his bids for the Republican nomination in 1960, 1964, and 1968.
In 1956, he created the Special Studies Project, a major seven-panel planning group directed by Henry Kissinger and funded by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, of which he was then president.

Alexander Haig

Alexander M. HaigAlexander M. Haig Jr.Haig
One note quotes Nixon as saying "get K. [Kissinger] out of the play—Haig handle it".
In 1969 Haig became an assistant to National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger.

Vietnamization

VietnamisationAmerican withdrawal after 1972attempted to gradually turn the war over to
In office, and assisted by Kissinger, Nixon implemented a policy of Vietnamization that aimed to gradually withdraw U.S. troops while expanding the combat role of the South Vietnamese Army so that it would be capable of independently defending its government against the National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam, a Communist guerrilla organization, and the North Vietnamese army (Vietnam People's Army or PAVN).
Vietnamization fit into the broader détente policy of the Nixon administration, in which the United States no longer regarded its fundamental strategy as the containment of communism but as a cooperative world order, in which Nixon and his chief adviser Henry Kissinger were focused on the broader constellation of forces and the bigger world powers.