Henry of Bohemia

Henry of CarinthiaHenryHenry VIHenry of Gorizia-TyrolHenry VI of CarinthiaHenry I of BohemiaHenry of GoriziaHenry the CarinthianHenry VI, Duke of Carinthiaduke Henry of Gorizia-Tyrol
Henry of Carinthia (Heinrich von Kärnten, Jindřich Korutanský; c. 1265 – 2 April 1335), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), was Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Carniola (as Henry VI) as well as Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death.wikipedia
122 Related Articles

House of Gorizia

MeinhardinerCounts of GoriziaHouse of Meinhardin
1265 – 2 April 1335), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), was Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Carniola (as Henry VI) as well as Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death.
In 1306 and again from 1307 to 1310, Henry of Gorizia-Tyrol ruled as King of Bohemia and hold the titular title of King of Poland, due to his marriage with the Přemyslid heiress Anne.

Duchy of Carinthia

CarinthiaCarinthianDuke of Carinthia
1265 – 2 April 1335), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), was Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Carniola (as Henry VI) as well as Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death.
In 1335, after the death of Henry, the last male of this line, Emperor Louis the Bavarian gave Carinthia and the southern part of the Tyrol as an imperial fief to the Habsburg family on 2 May in Linz.

Otto III, Duke of Carinthia

Otto III of CarinthiaOttoOtto III
At first he ruled jointly with his brothers Otto (d.
He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.

List of Bohemian monarchs

King of BohemiaDuke of BohemiaBohemia
Henry became King of Bohemia, Margrave of Moravia and titular King of Poland in 1306 and again from 1307 until 1310.

House of Habsburg

HabsburgHabsburgsHabsburg dynasty
After his death, the Habsburgs tool over Carinthia and Carniola, and held them almost without interruption until 1918. However tensions with the House of Habsburg arose, when in 1306 Duke Henry married the Přemyslid princess Anne, the elder sister of King Wenceslaus III of Bohemia.
In the 1300s, their attempt to gain the Bohemian crown was frustrated first by Henry of Bohemia and finally by the House of Luxembourg.

List of Polish monarchs

King of PolandDuchy of PolandPolish king
Henry became King of Bohemia, Margrave of Moravia and titular King of Poland in 1306 and again from 1307 until 1310.

Albert I of Gorizia

AlbertAlbert I
Upon the partition of the Meinhardiner estates in 1271, his father maintained the Tyrolean lands, while Henry's uncle Albert received the County of Gorizia.
While the Tyrolean branch of the Meinhardiner dynasty became extinct in the male line upon the death of Meinhard's son Henry in 1335, Albert's descendants ruled Gorizia until the death of Count Leonhard in 1500.

Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia

Meinhard IIMeinhard II of Gorizia-TyrolMeinhard II of Tyrol
Henry was a younger son of Count Meinhard II of Görz-Tyrol and the Wittelsbach princess Elisabeth, the daughter of Duke Otto II of Bavaria and widow of the Hohenstaufen king Conrad IV of Germany.
This materialized in 1335 upon the death of his son Henry.

Margraviate of Moravia

MoraviaMargrave of MoraviaMoravian
Henry became King of Bohemia, Margrave of Moravia and titular King of Poland in 1306 and again from 1307 until 1310.

Henry VII, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry VIIEmperor Henry VIIHenry VII of Germany
Meanwhile, the new German king Henry VII, a member of the House of Luxembourg, also had cast a covetous eye on the Bohemian kingdom.
Unhappy with the rule of Henry of Carinthia, and wary of the claims of the Habsburgs who had some legitimate claim on the crown, they convinced Henry to marry his son John I, Count of Luxemburg to Elizabeth, the daughter of Wenceslas II, and so establish a claim to the Bohemian crown.

Anne of Bohemia (1290–1313)

AnneAnna of BohemiaAnna
However tensions with the House of Habsburg arose, when in 1306 Duke Henry married the Přemyslid princess Anne, the elder sister of King Wenceslaus III of Bohemia.
In 1306 Anne married Henry of Carinthia, a son of Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia and Elisabeth of Bavaria.

Margaret, Countess of Tyrol

MargaretMargarete MaultaschMargaret of Tyrol
Henry also reconciled with the Luxembourgs and in 1330 married his daughter Margaret off to King John's son John Henry.
Margaret was the only surviving daughter of Duke Henry of Carinthia, also landgrave of Carniola, Count of Tyrol and former King of Bohemia, with his second wife Adelaide, a daughter of the Welf duke Henry I of Brunswick.

Elizabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330)

Elisabeth of BohemiaElisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330)Elizabeth of Bohemia
In 1310 Henry VII arranged the marriage of his eldest son John with Elizabeth, the younger sister of the late King Wenceslaus III.
In 1306, after the murder of Elizabeth's brother Wenceslaus, Elizabeth's brother-in-law Henry became King of Bohemia.

Rudolf I of Bohemia

Rudolph III of AustriaRudolph IIIRudolph I of Bohemia
Upon Wenceslaus' assassination on August 4, the Přemyslids became extinct in the male line and Henry was elected his successor by the Bohemian nobility—against the will of his former ally King Albert I of Germany, who intended to install his eldest son Rudolf of Habsburg on the Bohemian throne.
Rudolph was vested with the Bohemian throne, however contested by his maternal uncle Henry of Gorizia, Duke of Carinthia and husband of Wenceslaus' sister Anne.

Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Louis IVLouis the BavarianEmperor Louis IV
He also helped King Albert and his Wittelsbach ally Louis IV to lay siege against Louis' revolting brother Rudolf I of the Palatinate at his Heidelberg residence in 1301.
Participants were Louis' brother, Rudolph I of the Palatinate, who objected to the election of his younger brother, Duke Rudolph I of Saxe-Wittenberg, and Henry of Carinthia, whom the Luxembourgs had deposed as King of Bohemia.

Limburg-Luxemburg dynasty

House of LuxembourgLuxembourgLuxembourg dynasty
Meanwhile, the new German king Henry VII, a member of the House of Luxembourg, also had cast a covetous eye on the Bohemian kingdom.

John Henry, Margrave of Moravia

John HenryJohn Henry of LuxembourgJohn Henry of Moravia
Henry also reconciled with the Luxembourgs and in 1330 married his daughter Margaret off to King John's son John Henry.
During the rise of the Wittelsbach emperor Louis IV, King John had made attempts to reconcile with his former rival Henry of Gorizia-Tyrol, Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol, whom he had deposed as Bohemian king in 1310.

Frederick the Fair

Frederick I of AustriaFrederick the HandsomeFrederick I
Despite his deposition, Henry claimed the title of king of Bohemia and the accompanying electoral dignity: he took part in the 1314 double election of the rex Romanorum at Frankfurt, voting for the Habsburg candidate Frederick the Fair.
On 19 October 1314 at Frankfurt-Sachsenhausen, Frederick received four out of seven votes, however two of them being contested, by Archbishop Henry II of Cologne, by Louis' brother Elector Palatine Rudolph I of Wittelsbach who did not want to support his younger brother, by the deposed King Henry of Bohemia (the Luxemburgs had deposed him as King of Bohemia, the late Emperor Henry VII having confirmed the kingdom as fief to his own son whose wife was Alzbeta of Bohemia, and besides, the 1313 death of Henry's wife Anna, eldest surviving daughter of king Venceslas II of Bohemia, had taken from Henry all other legitimacy except the tenuous thought that once recognized as king by being consort of the heiress, the recognition suffices for the entire lifetime of the man) and Duke Rudolph I of Saxe-Wittenberg (whose right was contested by his Lauenburg cousin, head of the senior branch).

Albert II, Duke of Austria

Albert II of AustriaAlbert IIAlbert II the Wise
After Henry's death in 1335, the Habsburg duke Albert II of Austria and his brother Otto took control of Carinthia and Carniola.
Furthermore, upon the death of his maternal uncle Duke Henry of Carinthia in 1335, Albert succeeded in establishing his claims on the Duchy of Carinthia and the March of Carniola, when he reached his enfeoffment by Emperor Louis IV against the claims raised by his mighty Luxembourg rival King John of Bohemia.

John of Bohemia

John of LuxembourgJohn the BlindJohn I of Bohemia
In 1310 Henry VII arranged the marriage of his eldest son John with Elizabeth, the younger sister of the late King Wenceslaus III.
Because Henry had imperial regiments accompany and protect the couple from Nuremberg to Prague the Czech forces were able to gain control of Prague and depose the reigning King Henry of Carinthia on 3 December 1310.

Wenceslaus III of Bohemia

Wenceslaus IIIWenceslausWenceslaus of Bohemia
However tensions with the House of Habsburg arose, when in 1306 Duke Henry married the Přemyslid princess Anne, the elder sister of King Wenceslaus III of Bohemia.
After deciding to invade Poland, Wenceslaus dismissed his young favorites and made his brother-in-law, Henry of Carinthia, governor.

March of Carniola

CarniolaCarniolanlandgrave of Carniola
1265 – 2 April 1335), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), was Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Carniola (as Henry VI) as well as Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death.
It remained with the Meinhardiner dynasty until Meinard's son, Duke Henry VI of Carinthia, died in 1335.

Mark an der Sann

SavinjaMarch of SavinjaMarch on the Sann
Henry at least managed to retain Carinthia and Tyrol by reconciliation with the Habsburg dynasty, ceding the March on the Sann (Savinja Valley in today Slovenia) to their Styrian duchy.
On 14 July 1311 Duke Henry of Carinthia of the Meinhardiner dynasty, having been worn down by the Habsburgs, ceded the Savinja valley on either side of the Sava to Styria.

County of Tyrol

TyrolTyroleanTirol
1265 – 2 April 1335), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner), was Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Carniola (as Henry VI) as well as Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death.
In 1307 Meinhard's son Henry was elected King of Bohemia, After his death, he had one surviving daughter, Margaret Maultasch, who could gain the rule only over Tyrol.

Stams

It became the burial place not only of Count Meinhard and his consort, but also of his son Duke Henry of Carinthia, of the Habsburg duke Frederick IV of Austria and his wife Anna of Brunswick, of his son Archduke Sigismund of Austria and his wife Eleanor of Scotland, as well as of Bianca Maria Sforza, second wife of Emperor Maximilian I.