Herbert Croly

Croly, HerbertHerbert David CrolyCrolyHerbert D. Croly
Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 – May 17, 1930) was an intellectual leader of the progressive movement as an editor, political philosopher and a co-founder of the magazine The New Republic in early twentieth-century America.wikipedia
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The New Republic

New RepublicBruce BlivenJoshua Kurlantzick
Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 – May 17, 1930) was an intellectual leader of the progressive movement as an editor, political philosopher and a co-founder of the magazine The New Republic in early twentieth-century America. In 1914, Willard Straight and his wife Dorothy Payne Whitney provided the financing for Croly's magazine, The New Republic.
The New Republic was founded by Herbert Croly, Walter Lippmann, and Walter Weyl through the financial backing of heiress Dorothy Payne Whitney and her husband, Willard Straight, who maintained majority ownership.

The Promise of American Life

His 1909 book The Promise of American Life looked to the constitutional liberalism as espoused by Alexander Hamilton, combined with the radical democracy of Thomas Jefferson.
The Promise of American Life is a book published by Herbert Croly, founder of The New Republic, in 1909.

Felix Frankfurter

FrankfurterJustice FrankfurterFrankfurter J
His political philosophy influenced many leading progressives including Theodore Roosevelt, as well as his close friends Judge Learned Hand and Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter.
During this period, Frankfurter read Herbert Croly's book The Promise of American Life, and became a supporter of the New Nationalism and of Theodore Roosevelt.

Modern liberalism in the United States

liberalliberalsLiberalism
Croly was one of the founders of modern liberalism in the United States, especially through his books, essays and a highly influential magazine founded in 1914, The New Republic.
Political writer Herbert Croly helped to define the new liberalism through The New Republic magazine and numerous influential books.

Progressivism in the United States

progressiveProgressivismprogressives
Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 – May 17, 1930) was an intellectual leader of the progressive movement as an editor, political philosopher and a co-founder of the magazine The New Republic in early twentieth-century America.
Progressive leaders like Herbert Croly and Walter Lippmann indicated their classically liberal concern over the danger posed to the individual by the practice of Eugenics.

Walter Weyl

Walter Edward Weyl
Calling themselves "The New Nationalists", Croly and Walter Weyl sought to remedy the relatively weak national institutions with a strong federal government. Croly, Walter Lippmann, and Walter Weyl were the co-founders of The New Republic.
In 1914, Weyl joined Herbert Croly and Walter Lippmann as a founding editors of The New Republic magazine, where he worked from 1914 to 1916.

Learned Hand

Judge Learned HandLearnedHand
His political philosophy influenced many leading progressives including Theodore Roosevelt, as well as his close friends Judge Learned Hand and Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter.
Between 1909 and 1914, under the influence of Herbert Croly's social theories, Hand supported New Nationalism.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
His 1909 book The Promise of American Life looked to the constitutional liberalism as espoused by Alexander Hamilton, combined with the radical democracy of Thomas Jefferson.
By the Progressive era, Herbert Croly, Henry Cabot Lodge, and Theodore Roosevelt praised his leadership of a strong government.

Jane Cunningham Croly

Jane Cunningham
Herbert Croly was born in Manhattan, New York City in 1869 to journalists Jane Cunningham Croly—better known by her pseudonym “Jenny June”—and David Goodman Croly.
Herbert Croly went on to a career in journalism, becoming editor of The New Republic magazine.

Mark Hanna

Marcus A. HannaMarcus HannaMarcus Alonzo Hanna
The publication of The Promise of American Life in 1909 earned Croly a lot of publicity and the attention of some important people, including Dan Hanna, Mark Hanna’s son.
According to Hanna biographer Herbert Croly, "he had gained little from the first nine years of his business life except experience."

David Goodman Croly

David CrolyDavid G. Croly
Herbert Croly was born in Manhattan, New York City in 1869 to journalists Jane Cunningham Croly—better known by her pseudonym “Jenny June”—and David Goodman Croly.
David Goodman Croly was the father of the writer Herbert Croly, co-founder of The New Republic magazine.

Walter Lippmann

Walter LippmanLippmannLippmann, Walter
Croly, Walter Lippmann, and Walter Weyl were the co-founders of The New Republic.
In 1913, Lippmann, Herbert Croly, and Walter Weyl became the founding editors of The New Republic magazine.

Willard Dickerman Straight

Willard StraightWillard D. Straight
In 1914, Willard Straight and his wife Dorothy Payne Whitney provided the financing for Croly's magazine, The New Republic.
In 1914, Willard Straight, his wife, and Herbert Croly began publication of The New Republic, a weekly political magazine that quickly became the voice of American liberalism.

New Nationalism (Theodore Roosevelt)

New NationalismThe New NationalismNew Nationalism (Theodore Roosevelt speech)
When Roosevelt ran for president in 1912 as a candidate for the Bull Moose party, he used the slogan "New Nationalism".
The book The Promise of American Life, written in 1909 by Herbert Croly, influenced Theodore Roosevelt.

Political philosophy

political theorypolitical philosopherpolitical theorist
Herbert David Croly (January 23, 1869 – May 17, 1930) was an intellectual leader of the progressive movement as an editor, political philosopher and a co-founder of the magazine The New Republic in early twentieth-century America.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
His political philosophy influenced many leading progressives including Theodore Roosevelt, as well as his close friends Judge Learned Hand and Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter.

Jeffersonian democracy

JeffersonianJeffersoniansJeffersonian Democrat
His 1909 book The Promise of American Life looked to the constitutional liberalism as espoused by Alexander Hamilton, combined with the radical democracy of Thomas Jefferson.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
His 1909 book The Promise of American Life looked to the constitutional liberalism as espoused by Alexander Hamilton, combined with the radical democracy of Thomas Jefferson.

Pacifism

pacifistpacifistspacifistic
He promoted a strong army and navy and attacked pacifists who thought democracy at home and peace abroad was best served by keeping America weak.

Liberalism

liberalliberalssocially liberal
In his 1914 book Progressive Democracy, Croly rejected the thesis that the liberal tradition in the United States was inhospitable to anti-capitalist alternatives.

Anti-capitalism

anti-capitalistanticapitalistAnticapitalism
In his 1914 book Progressive Democracy, Croly rejected the thesis that the liberal tradition in the United States was inhospitable to anti-capitalist alternatives.

Capitalism

capitalistcapitalistscapitalistic
He drew from the American past a history of resistance to capitalist wage relations that was fundamentally liberal, and he reclaimed an idea that progressives had allowed to lapse—that working for wages was a lesser form of liberty.

Welfare state

welfarewelfare statessocial state
Increasingly skeptical of the capacity of social welfare legislation to remedy social ills, Croly argued that America's liberal promise could be redeemed only by syndicalist reforms involving workplace democracy.

Syndicalism

syndicalistsyndicalistsrevolutionary syndicalism
Increasingly skeptical of the capacity of social welfare legislation to remedy social ills, Croly argued that America's liberal promise could be redeemed only by syndicalist reforms involving workplace democracy.